• New Beginning for Clinical Librarians: Getting the Program off the Ground

      Blake, Lindsay; Gaines, Julie K.; UGA/GRU Partnership Campus; Georgia Regents University (2012-11)
      Question: How to integrate Librarians into existing clinical structures. Setting: Children’s and regional hospitals and clinics in Georgia where Georgia Health Sciences students and faculty are affiliated. Participants: Two Librarians at Georgia Health Sciences University located in two cities working with various hospital departments and faculty. Methods: Librarians work with departments in the hospitals and area clinics to integrate Evidence Based Medicine(EBM) and Patient and Family Centered Care(PFCC) into the medical student and resident education. Both of the Librarians are starting clinical librarian services. The services are in two different cities and stages in the medical education. One Librarian started in an established position working with residents and students in Family Medicine and Pediatrics, but had to rebuild after years of vacancy. The other Librarian is working with a new clerkship program so she is working directly with the clerkship directors to find ways to get involved with the students as they begin their clinical rotations. Main Finding: Librarians found various ways to assimilate themselves into the existing clinical structure. The methods they used varied by campus, hospital and/or department. Librarians were incorporated into a number of activities including: morning report, rounding, journal club, academic half days and scholarly projects. Conclusions: The Librarians found that various methods needed to be employed to incorporate their assistance in the hospital and clinical departments. The importance of communication and getting to know the clinical department environment and key players helps the Librarians to integrate into the structure.
    • The New Normal at GRU Libraries: Managing Change/Seeking Innovation

      Feher, Virginia; Davies, Kathy J; Verburg, Fay L; McCarrell, Kyle; Mears, Kim; Reese Library (Georgia Regents University, 2013-05-16)
      On January 8th 2013, Augusta State University and Georgia Health Sciences University consolidated to form Georgia Regents University. With this consolidation, ASU Reese Library and GHSU Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library administratively combined. The two libraries serve very different user populations. Reese provides access to a broad range of information resources for undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and community users. Greenblatt provides access to evidence-based resources in support of teaching, research, and clinical care for students, faculty, community users, and the GRU Health System. As part of the consolidation process, Reese and Greenblatt faculty and staff collaborated on reconciling differences in policies, procedures, service models, collection development, and library governance, all while seeking opportunities to enhance and innovate services. In this panel presentation, Reese and Greenblatt librarians will address challenges faced in the consolidation process, including combining GIL catalogs, expanding the liaison program, planning a consolidated website, and learning how to navigate differences in organizational culture.
    • On Campus or Out of Town: How Publishing Online Tutorials Can Help Your Patrons

      Blake, Lindsay; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Computers in Libraries, 2009-04)
      The article discusses online tutorials and publishing for distance-education programs of libraries. It is noted that online publishing is growing because of the emergence of online databases, electronic journals and electronic books. Libraries, on the other hand, prefer face-to-face teaching instead of online tutorial. It is recommended that libraries determine which topics to tackle in tutorials before developing them.
    • ORCID Implementation at Georgia Regents University

      Mears, Kim; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2015-05-17)
      ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) offers a solution to name ambiguity within the publishing world, as well as a method for scholars to maintain a professional record of scholarly activities. The Georgia Regents University Libraries facilitated the adoption and integration of ORCID throughout the GRU campus community by actively engaging faculty and graduate students, as well as integrating ORCID into key university systems. The library collaborated with the University’s Department of Human Resources (HR) and BioMed Central to enhance the adoption and integration of ORCID identifiers in university systems, including the institution’s digital repository, Scholarly Commons, and the University’s Human Resources Management System (HRMS). The library has also begun to focus on educating graduate students on the benefits of ORCID as they begin to build their research portfolio. Librarians can assist their institution in improving research information infrastructure and ORCID is unique because it is the only researcher identifier integrated into grant and manuscript submission systems. This project benefits researchers and the University by increasing the adoption and use of ORCID identifiers and supporting efforts to reduce confusion in regards to common or international names. This is especially important when scholarly productivity has a direct impact on promotion and tenure. ORCID integration in Scholarly Commons was completed in September 2014. Successes and challenges along with the librarians’ educational efforts to introduce ORCID will be reviewed.
    • Partnering with Business Faculty for Information Literacy Instruction

      Bustos, Rod; Blocker, LouAnn; Reese Library (Augusta State University, 2012-10-12)
      Presentation given at GACOMO 2012 about partnering with business school faculty for information literacy instruction.
    • Patient Encounter: Using Virtual EHR To Integrate Library Resources With Second Year Medical Students

      Davies, Kathy J; Bandy, Sandra L.; Kouame, Gail; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective Library faculty collaborated to explore new teaching approaches to illustrate student use of library resources in simulated clinical settings with standardized patients. Methods: Librarians co-developed clinical scenarios in collaboration with medical educators to connect library resources to standardized patient experiences for second-year students. Students interviewed standardized patients and used critical thinking to diagnosis the condition, guided by a librarian and clinical facilitator. In real time, students selected appropriate evidence-based medicine resources to complete the course assignment. The patient scenarios were adjusted with each teaching session, this year incorporating simulated patient electronic health records (EHR). Students incorporated library resources at each stage to evaluate the provided patient’s history, prescriptions, and clinical results to determine diagnosis and treatment. Results: The clinical scenarios illustrated how to use library resources effectively in a “real world” setting. In previous years, students distributed searching of the resources among the team members rather than completing the evidence-based process as a cohesive unit. The implementation of the virtual EHR reversed this trend with students working together to address each component of the standardized patient encounter. The students were more engaged with the recent changes and expressed greater understanding of library resources. Library faculty gained deeper knowledge of how clinicians and students view library resources use for evidence-based practice. Conclusions: Students utilized the opportunity to practice information seeking skills within a mock clinical setting and gained more experience using patient care tools. Knowledge of clinical library resources increased amongst the students with the recent insertion of the virtual EHR within the standardized patient experience.
    • Piloting an Online Evidence-Based Practice Course for Nurses

      Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay; Augusta University (2016-05)
    • Reference for the Remote User Through Embedded Librarianship

      Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Mears, Kim; Johnson, Melissa; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library; Walter M. Bortz III Library; Reese Library; Georgia Regents University; Hampden-Sydney College (Taylor & Francis, 2016-02)
      Embedded librarians serve an important role in assisting remote users. Despite the varying degrees of embeddedness, all maintain the goal of ensuring the same high quality reference and instruction services that users have come to expect from the traditional library setting. Embedded librarians select and use technology that most effectively meets the needs of this unique user group. This technology can include the library website, course management systems, research guides, lecture and screen capture software, remote reference (including telephone, chat, and email), web conferencing, online survey tools, citation management, and social media. [NOTE: This is an electronic version of an article published in The Reference Librarian, 2016, VOL. 57, NO. 3, 165–181. This article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02763877.2015.1131658.]
    • Research Information Architect: Building Research Information Infrastructure through ORCID Integration in University Systems

      Mears, Kim; Bandy, Sandra L.; Seago, Brenda L; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Georgia Regents University, 2014-10-17)
      ORCID iDs (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) provide authors with an international digital identifier to aid in maintaining a professional record of scholarly activities. The University Libraries sought to enhance the University’s information infrastructure through the integration of ORCID identifiers in key systems, including the institution’s digital repository, Scholarly Commons, and the PeopleSoft Human Resources Management System (HRMS).
    • Rethinking the Archives: History Lectures for the Health Sciences

      Bandy, Sandra L.; Sharrock, Renee; University Libraries (2016-10-05)
      Objective: Unlike many health sciences libraries, our library has a large and far-reaching Historical Collection and Archives (HCA) housing hidden treasures. Showcasing this collection, and the history of the health sciences, has often been a challenge. This poster showcases the development and implementation of a History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series. Method: The recent addition of historical donations from alumni and other health professionals has resulted in an increased interest in the library’s historical collections and archives. Making these collections discoverable is the primary goal as we have rare books dating back as far as 1608 and archives dating back to 1822, before the establishment of the school. The library hosted a variety of lectures that focused on its historical collections. Lectures have been tied to current library events and university courses. Creating this historical lecture series is a collaborative planning process which included numerous obstacles that required creative solutions. Steps in the planning process include: (1) connecting historical collections with faculty or alumni to design lectures; (2) developing marketing strategies across the health science campus that encourage attendance and interest; and (3) assessing the effectiveness of the lecture series.
    • Review of Doody's Core Titles in the Health Sciences 2004 (DCT 2004).

      Spasser, Mark A; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Medical College of Georgia (2005-08-18)
    • Rhabdomyolysis after spin class?

      Parmar, Simrat; Chauhan, Bindiya; DuBose, Jacqueline; Blake, Lindsay; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library; Department of Family Medicine; Georgia Regents University (The Journal of Family Practice, 2012-10)
      Primary care physicians frequently encourage patients to lead a more active, healthy lifestyle. The rise in popularity of endurance events, yoga, and organized gym-based fitness classes has, no doubt, improved the health of those who participate. But what happens when an individual moves too quickly from a sedentary existence to a more physically active one?
    • Scholarly Commons: GHSUs Institutional Repository

      Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Health Sciences University (Georgia Health Sciences University, 2011-11)
    • Serving Today's Students While Creating the Library of Tomorrow

      Logue, Natalie; Seago, Brenda L; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Methods: An academic health sciences library received funding to initiate a major renovation project. In early stages of the project, library leadership and the Access Services Librarian had regular meetings with the design team to discuss possible floor plans and furniture needs. Student needs were in the forefront of discussions and guided planning to meet both practical needs and desired aesthetic upgrades. Throughout the renovation, the library provided announcements, signage, and online updates to keep stakeholders apprised of progress and affected areas. As demolition began, noise, dust and debris became concerns. The library worked with the construction managers repeatedly to reduce the stress and disruption for students, including planning for when certain construction activities could take place and providing regular communication.Results: The library has a new public service desk, new carpeting and flooring, compact shelving, upgraded restrooms, a new Creative Technology Lab (a maker space), and more open floor space. Space is reallocated to allow for more group study and clearer access to service areas such as the Research & Education Services office suite and the Historical Collections and Archives. Visitors to the library expressed interest and approval of the changes in the library. Suggestions for new areas and concerns about the changing space have been shared with the library verbally, via email, and through an anonymous comment system. Conclusions:Renovation of an occupied, high-use building on an academic campus provides many challenges, but can be accomplished in a way that responds to students’ needs. Library personnel’s frequent consultations with construction team members is essential for the success of a renovation project. The new space aligns with student requests and future student and faculty needs for technology, collaborative work, and knowledge discovery.
    • Shaping the Future of Education for the Medical Library Association

      Kouame, Gail; Holmes, Heather; Laera, Elizabeth; Augusta University; Medical University of South Carolina; Brookwood Baptist Health (Augusta University, 2019-10-11)
      Objective: Inform health sciences information professionals about the newly developed structure for educational programming for the Medical Library Association (MLA) based on MLA’s Professional Competencies. Methods: MLA appointed the Education Steering Committee and six Education Curriculum Committees to develop education content based on the Association’s revised Professional Competencies. The Competencies provide the framework that define the skills to be gained as a result of educational offerings. The Education Curriculum Committees are charged with: 1. Designing and planning curriculum and educational offerings and resources; 2. Providing direction, expertise, and knowledge to creators and instructors of educational offerings with respect to content and instructional design; 3. Reviewing and assessing offerings to ensure they are high quality and current, meet learning outcomes, and have a succession plan. The work of the Curriculum Committees is shaped by the curriculum priorities document set forth by the Education Steering Committee, beginning with a “Bootcamp” that incorporates foundational offerings across the Competencies. Results: The Education Curriculum Committees suggest topics and speakers for MLA’s monthly webinars and for Continuing Education courses offered at the Association’s Annual Meetings. In the past year, Education Curriculum Committees have engaged with subject matter experts and with professional instructional designers to create online self-paced courses. A middle management symposium, sponsored by the Leadership & Management Education Curriculum Committee, was offered at the MLA 2019 Annual Meeting. Curriculum Committees are exploring other modes for providing educational content, such as podcasts, journal clubs or discussion groups. Existing courses and webinars are tagged with Professional Competencies in MEDLIB-ED, MLA’s continuing education portal. Conclusions: MLA’s Professional Competencies provide a meaningful framework for planning and organizing educational offerings. Education Curriculum Committees follow the curriculum priorities to plan their work, but also have flexibility to be innovative in suggesting other possible content and methods to support professional development and education for information professionals.
    • Streamlining the Library System: Preparing for the Next-generation

      Logue, Natalie; Bandy, Sandra L.; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2017-05)
      Objectives: This presentation examines challenges the only health sciences library system faced during the migration of a state-wide consortium from Ex Libris Voyager to Alma. Alma is a cloud-based system constructed for print, OER, and digital collections that will allow the institution to grow beyond Voyager, which is nearing the end of its lifecycle. Methods: A library team of Access Services and Content Management librarians and staff was formed to manage the data cleanup and implementation process. Members of this team were also involved in consortium committees which communicated problems and solutions between the 29 consortium institutions. Ex Libris provided the library with 59 data cleanup tasks and accompanying SQL report queries to systematically evaluate the library’s current integrated library system. The implementation team met weekly to review reports and determine best practices for the data to migrate correctly over to Alma. Data cleanup reports indicated that several groups of data were inconsistent with the libraries best practices within patron records and cataloging records including item holdings. Report findings identified instances of human error, opportunities for improved organization, and methods of preservation for NLM classification cataloging records. Results: Of the 59 data cleanup tasks, 39 were determined to be applicable to the health sciences library. Best practices established include reducing the number of patron groups, item locations, and item types. Some cleanup tasks required little work as others were more time consuming. The library identified over 500 patron records that were duplicate or inactive for three or more years and were deleted from the current system. Over 700 cataloging records with mismatched locations and holding records with missing items were identified and corrected. Two solutions were also identified to insure the health sciences NLM classification subject headings would migrate over to the Alma environment. Conclusion: The Alma ILS is built to accommodate physical and electronic records and manage patron records externally. The data cleanup tasks most significantly prepared library data to migrate successfully into a new organization and cataloging model, but also established new best practices for Alma and eliminated messy and outdated records. Preparing to migrate from one integrated library system to another, the library reviewed numerous patron records and cataloging records cleaning them up so unnecessary data would not transfer. Upon completing these tasks, the library is equipped to move to the next step of validating content in the new system.
    • Strong Roots Produce Stronger Branches via Digital Surrogates

      Sharrock, Renee; Bandy, Sandra; Augusta University Libraries (2019-10-17)
      Historical Collections & Archives (HCA) is comprised of campus archives, rare books, and medical artifacts on the Health Sciences campus of Augusta University. Scholarly Commons is the institutional repository for Augusta University and is operated and managed by the Content Management Department of the Greenblatt Library. HCA has broadened its online presence by digitizing significant print publications, historical documents, and medical artifacts and depositing the digital items into Scholarly Commons.
    • Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in the Hospital and the Library: Two Different Groups, One Course

      Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 2013)
      Key roles in teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) are of interest to many hospital and academic librarians. This article describes how three academic librarians, in collaboration with the academic medical center's EBP Nursing Council, developed a seminar consisting of three credit hours of instruction in the basics of evidence-based practice. The seminar consists of three core elements: basic principles of EBP and finding literature, clinical experience and integration of knowledge into the hospital setting, and patient education and participation. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of the literature, institutional models of practice change, and the importance of patient roles in guideline development.
    • Tenure-Related Recommendations for Library faculty of Georgia Regents University

      Baker, Camilla B.; Davies, Kathy J; Feher, Virginia; Shipman, Peter; Verburg, Fay L; Waggoner-Angleton,Carol; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library; Reese Library; Georgia Regents University (2012-10-08)
      The Georgia Health Sciences University (GHSU) Provost, the Vice President for Instruction and Enrollment Management and Associate Provost, and the Augusta State University Vice President for Academic Affairs are requesting the consolidated library faculty to issue recommendations on tenure for new hires and the post-tenure review expectations for the consolidated library faculty. According to the original charge, the report should compare tenure practices of the Georgia Regents University (GRU) consolidated library faculty to the tenure practices and trends of library faculty at benchmark institutions. However, the list of referent and aspirational institutions based on GRU’s potential Carnegie classification has not been finalized. This creates a challenge to identify definitive institutions with which to compare library tenure policies. The consolidated library faculty are members of the USG Corps of Instruction with faculty status and rank and are eligible for promotion. The consolidated library faculty participate in faculty governance, teaching, and scholarly activities at their respective campuses. The information provided by the consolidated libraries should inform the work of the Consolidation Promotion and Tenure Work Team. The following position paper will provide the background, assessment, and recommendations concerning tenure for library faculty in the consolidated libraries.
    • The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Medical Research versus Human Rights

      Blake, Lindsay (2010)
      The Tuskegee Syphilis Study of the Untreated Male Negro has become a landmark in medical history. Since the existence of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study became public knowledge in the 1970s it has been widely regarded as one of the most blatant examples of medical racism. Knowledge of the experiments is widespread throughout minority. The study has been blamed for low African American participation in medical research by creating distrust of the medical community. Because the study was funded by the Public Health Service (PHS) it has also created a climate of distrust of the government by poor and minority populations across the United States.