• Adapting an embedded model of librarianship, college by college.

      Blake, Lindsay; Mears, Kim; Davies, Kathy J; Ballance, Darra; Shipman, Peter; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Gaines, Julie K.; Georgia Regents University (Taylor & Francis, 2014-07-14)
      Librarians are increasingly moving out of the library and into the wider university setting as patrons spend more time seeking information online and less time visiting the library. The move to embed librarians in colleges, departments, or customer groups has been going on for some time but has recently received more attention as libraries work to find new ways to reach patrons that no longer need to come to the physical library. Few universities have attempted to embed all their librarians. This case study describes how one group of health sciences librarians dispersed its professional staff throughout its campuses and medical centers.
    • Authentic Assessment in the Library Classroom

      Baker, Camilla B.; Reese Library (Georgia Regents University, 2013-08-23)
      Typical survey instruments used in library classrooms tend to place more emphasis on presenter performance than on student learning. The uses of teacher evaluation surveys are clear for personnel evaluative purposes. What is less clear is whether the effort expended on library instruction is worth the time invested in it, when framed in the context of student outcomes. In other words, is librarian performance in the classroom more important than student learning? The use of active learning techniques in library classrooms focuses attention on the materials at hand, often in ways that lectures and demonstrations cannot. This paper will define the attributes of authentic assessment, and explain how this type of assessment can be used in a library classroom, even a single session, once a semester, in order to put more emphasis on student learning, using the exercise itself to shape the expected student outcomes. Examination of a sample of completed student questions after such a class showed that students need more emphasis in two outcome areas, documentation and moving successfully from identification of desired items to retrieval of those items. These are areas where students often need extra assistance, but it can be challenging to provide that assistance in a single class where other outcomes also compete for both the students’ and teacher’s attention. However, a stronger focus on student learning creates a better measure of the value of the class than does a survey more suited to a performance evaluation.
    • Back to the Basics!: Career Development for Early Career Librarians Through SubjectIntensive Conferences

      Logue, Natalie; Stuart, Ansley (2017-05)
      To assess a subject intensive conference for career development benefits among librarians with less than 5 years of professional experience.
    • Boldly Going To New Horizons: Engaging the Community in Biomedical Research and Precision Medicine

      Shipman, Peter; Kouame, Gail; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective:To adapt a traditional consumer health information outreach approach to include a community health education message targeting the benefits for the general public of participation in biomedical research. Methods: An outreach award led to the expansion of a traditional consumer health information message to include the basics of biomedical research and informed consent. Urban, suburban, and rural public libraries and Federally Qualified Health Centers in eastern and central Georgia will host ten consumer health presentations by medical librarians. Presentations will have three themes: becoming well-informed about disease conditions and medications using MedlinePlus, understanding the process and benefits of biomedical research studies, and use the All of Us research program as an example of a new type of precision medicine study that recruits partners (not subjects) from populations that do not traditionally participate in research. The importance of understanding the risks and benefits of enrolling in a research study will be discussed. Results: To be determined.
    • Book Review: LANCASTER, F. W. If You Want to Evaluate Your Library ...

      King, DN; College of Library and Information Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (Medical Library Association, 1989-07)
    • Building a DREAM: Medical Librarians Collaborating in the Creation of an Assessment Database

      Blake, Lindsay; Davies, Kathy J; University Libraries (2014-05)
      Program Objective: The DREAM (Directory and Repository of Educational Assessment Measures) project built a repository of peer-reviewed assessment measures used in health sciences education. Program: Librarians collaborated with the school of medicine’s educational department, the Educational Innovation Institute (EII), to create a medical assessment database, DREAM. The DREAM database is hosted within the MedEdPORTAL on the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) website. Librarians tailored searches to the six main Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies. The librarians worked closely with the DREAM project coordinator to craft PubMed searches that would find a variety of assessment tools for students and residents clustered around the six competencies. The searches were combed for Psychometrically Evidenced, Appearing Repeatedly in a Literature Search (PEARLS). PEARLS were sent out to reviewers, who prepared a critical analysis. A Critical Synthesis Package, which includes librarian created indexing, is then placed on the DREAM site. Main Results: The DREAM initiative launched online officially in October 2013. The six ACGME searches will be expanded to cover the entire health sciences arena and social science databases. Librarians have become full-partners with the EII team on the DREAM project, designing not only searches, but providing feedback, participating in monthly meetings, and assisting as needed. DREAM has gained national attention and led to further Librarian involvement in projects on campus and for other organizations. Conclusion: The collaboration between the EII and the medical library is mutually beneficial. The medical librarians have gained national recognition for their inclusion in the DREAM project. The project has been presented at medical education and library conferences. Librarians are collaborating on an article with the EII DREAM team for publication in the medical education literature. Librarians have also improved on their searching skills in PubMed by expanding their knowledge of both MeSH and indexing. This has helped them to become more efficient and productive searchers.
    • Captured Memories Make History: Recording the Memories of Retirees for the Oral History Project of the Southern Chapter/MLA

      Kane, Laura T.; Price, Helvi McCall; Blake, Lindsay (2009-05)
      Beginning in the 1990's, the SC/MLA History Committee members recorded five oral histories. The transcriptions were stored in the Chapter archives. In 2003-2004 Richard Nollan, Chair and Laura Kane, a member of the Southern Chapter History Committee, resurrected the Oral History Project. More members were retiring, and it was felt that their memories of Southern Chapter events should be preserved. Committee members publicized the project and began a list of possible interviewees. They developed the first Oral History web page, displaying the original five oral histories. In 2006-2007 Laura Kane, then Chair of the History Committee, added new initiatives to the Oral History Project. An official list of interview questions was developed and added to the web page along with three new transcriptions of oral history interviews. Bernie Smith of the MLA Oral History Committee contacted Laura Kane to discuss collaborating on oral histories. The SC/MLA Oral History Committee was identified as the model for other Chapter oral history projects.
    • Combining Research Results and Dental Accreditation Requirements to Create Instruction Opportunities

      Shipman, Peter; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2017-05)
      Objectives: The aim of this program is to expand librarian instructional opportunities and improve student performance in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) competencies. Methods: A recent librarian-led internal study of EBD behaviors of fourth-year dental students at external clerkships indicated poor recall of the EBD process (question, find, appraise, act, evaluate). A dental school curriculum subcommittee, including the librarian, is currently meeting to evaluate the presence of the EBD competency in the curriculum in preparation for an accreditation review. Preliminary screening of course syllabi identified five possible courses and two EBD process rubrics supporting the EBD competency accreditation standard. A need for further EBD process training by the librarian may be indicated by the low number of rubrics which correlates to poor student recall of the EBD process in the librarian’s study. Performing the study and having membership on the subcommittee gives the librarian a platform to advocate for instructional opportunities that improve student performance in the EBD competency standard prior to accreditation review. Results: The evidence-based dentistry subcommittee of the dental school curriculum committee was able to identify three more additional courses supporting the EBD accreditation standard. Assistance in EBD supplied by the librarian for first semester, second-year dental students confirms continued poor recall of the EBD process. This cohort of dental students was not in the original research study. The taskforce could not identify any fourth-year course work that includes support of the EBD accreditation standard. In the lockstep curriculum, there are gaps in semesters when students are not being tested in the EBD process. The dental librarian added two new instructional sessions after the research study (one undergraduate, one advanced education). Conclusion: Students are receiving exposure to EBD principles to satisfy the accreditation standard, but the lack of awareness of the EBD process indicates it may be difficult for dental schools to determine if new graduates can effectively perform evidence-based dentistry in future dental practice. The EBD taskforce believes more faculty development in EBD is necessary. The dental librarian will have a role in training faculty in evidence-based dentistry.
    • Consolidation: A Tale of Two Libraries

      Heck, Jeffrey J; Davies, Kathy J; Verburg, Fay L; Brown, Marianne; Loveless, Virginia L; Bandy, Sandra L.; Seago, Brenda L; Georgia Regents University (American Library Association, 2013-10)
      This paper describes the initiating action, planning, adaptations, and official conclusion of a one-year consolidation of a professional health-sciences library with a largely commuter-student undergraduate liberal arts library, during the consolidation of their corresponding universities. Ties existed between some university programs, such as nursing, but the cultures of the two universities differed. The structure established to handle the consolidation allowed effective communication and cooperative development of policies and processes. Reaccreditation efforts also required extensive work to reflect the new university. Crucial lessons were learned from the intensive effort.
    • The contribution of hospital library information services to clinical care: a study in eight hospitals.

      King, DN; Library Research Center, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois, Urbana (Medical Library Association, 1987-10)
      Hospital health sciences libraries represent, for the vast majority of health professionals, the most accessible source for library information and services. Most health professionals do not have available the specialized services of a clinical medical librarian, and rely instead upon general information services for their case-related information needs. The ability of the hospital library to meet these needs and the impact of the information on quality patient care have not been previously examined. A study was conducted in eight hospitals in the Chicago area as a quality assurance project. A total of 176 physicians, nurses, and other health professionals requested information from their hospital libraries related to a current case or clinical situation. They then assessed the quality of information received, its cognitive value, its contribution to patient care, and its impact on case management. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents asserted that they would definitely or probably handle their cases differently as a result of the information provided by the library. Almost all rated the libraries' performance and response highly. An overview of the context and purpose of the study, its methods, selected results, limitations, and conclusions are presented here, as is a review of selected earlier research.
    • Creating a Mobile Library Website

      Cutshall, Tom; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Health Sciences University (Information Today, Inc., 2011-09)
      This article discusses the perceived need for a mobile library website, how the site was created and expansion of the site. This includes the technical and design information. Our setting is a health sciences university and hospital in Georgia. The project started with an informal poll of our patrons. We then looked at how other libraries were creating their mobile sites. It was decided to create a mobile website to accommodate our patrons and also take advantage of the vendor and consortium mobile products available to us. This allows us to take advantage of web based mobile products that are not applications, which already have a page on our website. We are now able to reach our patrons in a novel way that takes into consideration the explosion of smartphone usage and the variety of 12 smartphone platforms. Statistics show that our patrons are using the services and resources offered. As expected PubMed is receiving the highest number of hits, but our general health, nursing and drug databases are also showing good usage Our mobile site allows patrons to access the Library resources and services when and where they desire. The mobile site provides our patrons the flexibility to access our resources and services with a mobile device they probably already carry on their person. No need to find a laptop or head across campus to the library building for many library needs.
    • Creating a Mobile Library Website

      Cutshall, Tom; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Health Sciences University (Information Today, Inc., 2011-10)
      Question/Objective: Discuss the perceived need for a mobile library website, how the site was created and expansion of the site. This includes the technical and design information. Setting or Participants: A health sciences university and hospital in Georgia. Methodology: The project started with an informal poll of our patrons. We then looked at how other libraries were creating their mobile sites. It was decided to create a mobile website to accommodate our patrons and also take advantage of the vendor and consortium mobile products available to us. This allows us to take advantage of web based mobile products that are not applications, which already have a page on our website. We are now able to reach our patrons in a novel way that takes into consideration the explosion of smartphone usage and the variety of 12 smartphone platforms. Findings: Statistics show that our patrons are using the services and resources offered. As expected PubMed is receiving the highest number of hits, but our general health, nursing and drug databases are also showing good usage Conclusion: Our mobile site allows patrons to access the Library resources and services when and where they desire. The mobile site provides our patrons the flexibility to access our resources and services with a mobile device they probably already carry on their person. No need to find a laptop or head across campus to the library building for many library needs.
    • Creating a Mosaic of History Lectures for the Health Sciences

      Bandy, Sandra L.; Sharrock, Renee; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Objective: Unlike many health sciences libraries, our library has a large and far-reaching Historical Collection and Archives (HCA) room housing hidden treasures. Showcasing this collection, and the history of the health sciences, has often been a challenge. This paper examines the development and implementation of a History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series. Method: The recent addition of historical donations from alumni and other health professionals has resulted in an increase interest in the library’s historical collections and archives. Making these collections discoverable is the primary goal. The library hosted a mosaic of lectures that focused on the library’s historical collections. Lectures have been tied to current library events and university courses. Creating this historical lecture series is a collaborative planning process which included many obstacles and creative solutions. Steps in this process include: (1) connecting historical collections with faculty or alumni to design the lecture; (2) developing marketing strategies across the health science campus that encourage attendance and interest; and (3) assessing the effectiveness of the lecture series.
    • Designing a DREAM Database and Delivering TIME Competency Measures: Library Faculty Integration in Medical Education Assessment

      Davies, Kathy J; Blake, Lindsay; Georgia Regents University (2013-10)
      Purpose: This paper describes librarian roles as full partners in creating a database of health sciences education assessment instruments (DREAM) and locating instruments to measure medical student milestones for the Transformation in Medical Education (TIME) initiative to design a competency based medical education curriculum. Setting/Participants: A research university with an academic health sciences center and undergraduate liberal arts and sciences campus. Librarians partnered with faculty in the institution’s Educational Innovation Institute to develop the DREAM database and serve as members of the TIME project consultation team. Methods: Library faculty tailored PubMed searches for assessment instruments linked to ACGME competencies. Librarians and research faculty determined that a public searchable database of free, validated, and peer- reviewed assessment tools would fill an existing information gap. The DREAM database was presented at the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) Annual Meeting and is now hosted on MedEdPORTAL at the AAMC website. Lead faculty members of the TIME project then contacted the DREAM team to request consultation on identifying assessment instruments. Librarians will complete assessment searching based around 12 main competency areas with over 100 student achievement milestones. Results: Library faculty developed assessment filters for MEDLINE and CINAHL and adapted them as needed for competency search processes. The next phase was developing the database taxonomy from existing controlled vocabulary resources. Library faculty assisted in creating peer review forms and determining database record format. Identifying TIME competency assessment tools required developing over 60 comprehensive searches focusing on specific student behaviors. Intensive searching of health sciences databases has led librarians to develop a better grasp of medical education and assessment terminology and article indexing. Conclusions: DREAM is scheduled for a fall launch; TIME reports will be completed during the winter of 2013. The DREAM team will monitor the database and library faculty will design search strategies to identify additional assessment instruments. Library faculty can be fully integrated in research and assessment initiatives. Collaboration with EII faculty has brought librarians additional referrals and provided opportunities to assist in projects benefiting the library, university and our own careers.
    • Developing Information Analysis Mastery: Blending Bioinformatics and Evidence Based Searching

      Blake, Lindsay; Davies, Kathy J; Yang, Frances; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2014)
      Presentation from the 2014 Medical Library Association Southern Chapter Annual Meeting.
    • Early Adoptors of Digital Library Technology

      King, DN; Division of Medical Information Science, University of California, San Francisco, CA (Medical Library Association. Journal of the Research Section of MLA., 1996)
    • East Central Public Health District Disaster Health Information Project

      Davies, Kathy J; Seago, Brenda L; Adriano, Jonathan; Walker, Larry; Robert B. Greenblatt MD Library (2013-10)
      GRU Libraries developed adisaster health information portal in collaboration with Georgia East Central Public Health District. The portal content was based on a needs assessment survey. Several trainng sessions were conducted throughout the region to build awareness of NLM Disaster Health Information Resources.
    • Educational Backgrounds of Medical and Health Science Librarians

      Stuart, Ansley; Augusta University Libraries (2016-10)
      Objective: To determine the educational backgrounds of health science librarians before and while they maintain their current positions. Methods: Many librarians who work in the health sciences field do not have undergraduate or graduate degrees in a STEM field. Most publications about health science librarians’ education focus on job skills librarians should learn to become better information specialists rather than past educational accomplishments. An online survey will be distributed nationally using Qualtrics software. The survey will gather information about medical and health science librarians’ formal educational history and ongoing educational pursuits since accepting their current librarian position.
    • Embarrassment of Riches--Adapting to a Surfeit of Instruction Time Teaching Evidence-Based Dentistry Concepts to First-Year Dental Students

      Shipman, Peter; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective: The medical librarian will develop new active learning content for first-year predoctoral dental students to learn the Question and Find portions of the evidence-based dentistry (EBD) process. Methods: Restructuring of the dental curriculum resulted in the librarian being awarded more instruction time to teach the Question (PICO –Problem, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome) and Find (search PubMed) portions of the evidence-based dentistry (EBD) process in a two-credit critical thinking research class. Instruction time increased from one session of 90 minutes to two sessions, 240 minutes total.A new active learning activity will be developed to enhance skills in portions of the course where the students have traditionally under performed, due to lack of time. These skills include more accurately matching clinical question concepts to the corresponding PICO element and analyzing the rigor of the automatic term mapping results in PubMed. Another key skill is to create new search strategies in PubMed when the search result list is inadequate or null.Some teaching elements from the previous version of the class will continue: the flipped classroom pre-class recordings, a PICO worksheet for in-class use, student reasoning of their search strategies, and the librarian providing live feedback of search strategies. Results: Increased instruction time leads to more examples of clinical questions, PICO formatting, and PubMed searching. A segment on the importance of lifelong learning in the context of competency-based education was added. A formative assessment session, a Jeopardy-style quiz element, was reinstated to the course. Conclusion: The students had more opportunities to actively learn evidence-based dentistry skills –PICO formatting, PubMed searching, and learning the EBD process. With more instruction time, greater emphasis could be devoted to lifelong learning, and a formative assessment session was used to tie in all the elements.
    • Embedded Librarians: Collaborations in Research and Teaching

      Gaines, Julie K.; Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay; Davies, Kathy J; Shipman, Peter; Ballance, Darra; Seago, Brenda L; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia Regents University, 2013-03)
      The increased use of online information resources has allowed health sciences librarians to seek new roles outside of the physical library. A proactive approach is needed to provide information at the time and location of need. The Georgia Regents University (GRU) Librarians have responded to this shift by exploring a model of embedded librarianship that provides specialized assistance and deeper involvement at the college level. Embedded librarianship uses a service model that incorporates librarians as active university participants as opposed to the traditional role of service providers.