• Creating a Mosaic of History Lectures for the Health Sciences

      Bandy, Sandra L.; Sharrock, Renee; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Objective: Unlike many health sciences libraries, our library has a large and far-reaching Historical Collection and Archives (HCA) room housing hidden treasures. Showcasing this collection, and the history of the health sciences, has often been a challenge. This paper examines the development and implementation of a History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series. Method: The recent addition of historical donations from alumni and other health professionals has resulted in an increase interest in the library’s historical collections and archives. Making these collections discoverable is the primary goal. The library hosted a mosaic of lectures that focused on the library’s historical collections. Lectures have been tied to current library events and university courses. Creating this historical lecture series is a collaborative planning process which included many obstacles and creative solutions. Steps in this process include: (1) connecting historical collections with faculty or alumni to design the lecture; (2) developing marketing strategies across the health science campus that encourage attendance and interest; and (3) assessing the effectiveness of the lecture series.
    • Evaluating an Embedded Program: Increasing Awareness, Expanding Services, and Fulfilling Patron Needs

      Ballance, Darra; Blake, Lindsay; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Introduction: Setting: Augusta University (AU), a comprehensive four-year university Nine colleges, an academic health center and over 8000 students. Campuses include the Health Sciences Campus, Undergraduate campus and Partnership Campus at the University of Georgia Three libraries (Greenblatt, Reese and the Partnership medical school) serve students, faculty and hospital staff. In 2012, Library administration, in collaboration with AU librarians, investigated a service model of librarian integration in their customers’ settings called embedded librarianship. Best practices suggested establishing office space for librarians among their designated customer groups. Once “embedded,” the librarian would become a part of customers’ daily activities and provide information support on-demand and in context. While there are descriptions of many facets of embedded librarian service, there is no comprehensive tool evaluating the activities of embedded librarians that can answer the question: how do patrons perceive the value of embedded librarian services? The embedded librarians at Augusta University sought to measure the awareness and perception of the new service model among clinicians, faculty, and students with a survey instrument. A validated instrument will assist in the proper implementation, maintenance, and evolution of an effective embedded service model.  Methods: Web-based survey, Likert scale and open-ended questions; Distributed by email in April 2015 using Qualtrics; All Augusta University students, full-time faculty, clinicians, and residents in areas where embedded librarians are assigned; Four colleges, two hospital departments, and one institute. Responses were solicited for four weeks; weekly reminder emails were sent, and the librarians personally encouraged participation from their embedded areas. The survey began by defining “embedded librarian.” Respondents who were unfamiliar with the program and unable to identify a librarian from the group were directed out of the survey.  The remaining respondents self-identified as a student, resident, clinician, or faculty member and then were routed to questions specific to their role. Students’ questions related to classwork and use of library resources; faculty questions related to teaching and research; and clinician/resident questions related to patient care and clinical training. Because most faculty also fulfill clinical roles, respondents who identified as faculty or clinician had the opportunity to answer both sets of questions. Results: The survey response rate was 10% with 381 completed forms from 4,408 survey recipients. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of respondents knew that an embedded program existed in their college or institute. 55% had worked with one or more librarians – in this question participants were asked to choose librarians by their picture and name. Of the 45% remaining, we asked why they had not had an opportunity to work with an embedded librarian. Responses indicated 1) Not aware or not known 2) Not doing research yet requiring that level of assistance, 3) have not needed one. The majority of faculty strongly agreed that embedded librarians saved them time and were an integral part of their group.  Analysis of locally collected data reveled that a high number of reference transactions occur in person which corresponds with survey results. Additional review of the data reflected an increasing trend toward librarian collaborations on grants, publications, and presentations. Conclusions: The survey suggests that perception - or how our patrons understand our role and value - may be the area needing the most improvement. To gauge perception of the program, the term “embedded librarian” was first clearly defined, then respondents were asked if they were aware that their college or department had an embedded librarian and finally to identify their embedded librarian from a photograph. It is important to note that all recipients of the survey belonged to a college or department with an embedded librarian. Of 381 responses, only 58% indicated that they were aware that their college or department had an embedded librarian, but nearly 74% were able to correctly identify their embedded librarian by photograph. This suggested that the embedded librarians were familiar faces within those colleges but there is a need to provide more education on embedded roles and services.
    • Library on Demand: Developing an Education Outreach Webinar Series

      Mears, Kim; Davies, Kathy J; Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Stuart, Ansley; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Objectives: To describe a collaborative project to host live and recorded instructional webinars; To highlight specific information resources; To promote underused library services Methods: Surveyed library employees to identify potential webinar topics; Established a priority order of topics and a calendar for the webinar series; Identified the technology platforms and best practices for online instruction delivery; Committee members provided technical assistance for both viewers and lecturers, coordinated scheduling, and served as instructors; Created a checklist for promotional procedures Results: Webinar series launched in August 2014; Topics scheduled bimonthly; Recorded webinars available on LibGuide as well as the Libraries’ YouTube channel; 1032 views of the series content since the creation of the LibGuide from June 2014 – March 2016 Conclusions: Developing an online webinar series proved to be a viable method to expand the Libraries’ educational program across campuses and increase librarian technology skills; Future directions include identifying topics and collaboration with the undergraduate library
    • Rethinking the Archives: History Lectures for the Health Sciences

      Bandy, Sandra L.; Sharrock, Renee; University Libraries (2016-10-05)
      Objective: Unlike many health sciences libraries, our library has a large and far-reaching Historical Collection and Archives (HCA) housing hidden treasures. Showcasing this collection, and the history of the health sciences, has often been a challenge. This poster showcases the development and implementation of a History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series. Method: The recent addition of historical donations from alumni and other health professionals has resulted in an increased interest in the library’s historical collections and archives. Making these collections discoverable is the primary goal as we have rare books dating back as far as 1608 and archives dating back to 1822, before the establishment of the school. The library hosted a variety of lectures that focused on its historical collections. Lectures have been tied to current library events and university courses. Creating this historical lecture series is a collaborative planning process which included numerous obstacles that required creative solutions. Steps in the planning process include: (1) connecting historical collections with faculty or alumni to design lectures; (2) developing marketing strategies across the health science campus that encourage attendance and interest; and (3) assessing the effectiveness of the lecture series.
    • Two Years in the Life of a Nursing Embedded Librarian

      Burchfield, Vicki; University Libraries (2016-05-15)
      Objective: To demonstrate usage patterns and activities of librarians embedded in a college of nursing after two years of data collection on transactions. Introduction: The Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library at Augusta University began an embedded librarian program within its constituent colleges, including the College of Nursing, in 2012. The College of Nursing has willingly and actively engaged with their embedded librarian (EL), providing an opportunity to analyze how the librarian’s knowledge, skills, and time are being used in order to better target services. The AU College of Nursing has four degree programs and one certificate program, with a total of 1,126 students in FY 2014. For a breakdown of students by degree type for FY 2014, see Figure 1. At present, the College of Nursing has campuses in Augusta and Athens, GA. Many of its programs are offered online. Methods: Two years' worth of usage statistics recorded by embedded librarians in LibAnswers were examined for patterns and trends in utilization of EL services. Interviews were conducted with librarians who acted in the role of EL for the College of Nursing since the inception of the university’s embedded librarian program to gain clues into the ways in which the librarians were active in the college. Results: From April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2016, 465 reference transactions were recorded from the College of Nursing. Of these transactions, 233 (50%) were initiated by students and 149 (32%) by faculty, with the remainder initiated by staff, senior administrators, librarians, and employees of the university’s health system; see Figure 2 for mode of contact by faculty, students, and staff. Student-initiated transactions were primarily basic reference or consultations, while faculty-initiated transactions were more distributed; see Figure 3. More than 50% of student interactions took greater than 15 minutes. 51% of faculty interactions took 15 minutes or less Student-initiated transactions showed a slight spike on Mondays and Fridays, when the EL holds office hours. Within the College of Nursing, the EL is part of the Center for Nursing Research. She holds office hours twice a week on Mondays and Fridays in an office located with the Center for Nursing Research in the College of Nursing. In addition to office hours, the EL participates in the Academic Affairs Committee, Information Technology Advisory Committee, and, at the hospital affiliated with the university, the nurses’ Evidence-Based Practice Council. The EL also leads orientations for each of the degree programs, and faculty frequently link tutorials created by the EL from courses in the university’s learning management system. Conclusions: While the EL does not receive many more questions during office hours than outside of office hours, having a physical presence in the College of Nursing allows the EL to become familiar with faculty and staff. Similarly, attendance at Academic Affairs Committee meetings helps the EL keep track of changes to the curriculum. One possible area for future research is whether there is a disparity in awareness and use of the EL between local and long-distance students and faculty.