• Adapting an embedded model of librarianship, college by college.

      Blake, Lindsay; Mears, Kim; Davies, Kathy J; Ballance, Darra; Shipman, Peter; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Gaines, Julie K.; Georgia Regents University (Taylor & Francis, 2014-07-14)
      Librarians are increasingly moving out of the library and into the wider university setting as patrons spend more time seeking information online and less time visiting the library. The move to embed librarians in colleges, departments, or customer groups has been going on for some time but has recently received more attention as libraries work to find new ways to reach patrons that no longer need to come to the physical library. Few universities have attempted to embed all their librarians. This case study describes how one group of health sciences librarians dispersed its professional staff throughout its campuses and medical centers.
    • Embedded Librarians: Collaborations in Research and Teaching

      Gaines, Julie K.; Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay; Davies, Kathy J; Shipman, Peter; Ballance, Darra; Seago, Brenda L; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia Regents University, 2013-03)
      The increased use of online information resources has allowed health sciences librarians to seek new roles outside of the physical library. A proactive approach is needed to provide information at the time and location of need. The Georgia Regents University (GRU) Librarians have responded to this shift by exploring a model of embedded librarianship that provides specialized assistance and deeper involvement at the college level. Embedded librarianship uses a service model that incorporates librarians as active university participants as opposed to the traditional role of service providers.
    • Health Literacy Training for Healthy Start Participants

      Mears, Kim; Georgia Regents University (2015-05-12)
      Objective The Healthy Start Program aims to improve the adequacy of prenatal care and patient education to high-risk populations experiencing a significantly higher percentage of infant deaths within the first year of life. This project describes the partnership between a librarian and a Healthy Start program to provide nurses, case managers, and community members with training on accessing and evaluating health information resources. Method The director of the Healthy Start program identified the need for training on accessing reliable, evidence-based health information and partnered with a librarian to provide the training. The librarian received a National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic Region training award to provide print materials and equipment necessary to complete the training. The librarian adapted curriculum from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and offered the training session twice at bi-annual consortium meetings for the Healthy Start program. Assessment of the training sessions were completed through pre and posttests and instructor evaluations. The librarian and director also completed necessary paperwork to qualify the training sessions for Georgia Nurses Association Continuing Education credit for all nurses in attendance. Results Attendance at both of the instruction sessions totaled 28 participants. 54% (n = 16) of participants completed the pre and posttests. Comparison between the pre and posttest scores indicate an increase in knowledge regarding reliable sources of evidence-based nursing resources and the ability to identify and evaluate health information found online. Verbal feedback from the participants indicated satisfaction with the course. Conclusions Partnerships between librarians and community programs can support the efforts of healthcare professional to increase their information literacy skills, potentially resulting in improved health care for their clients and community. This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the University of Maryland Baltimore.
    • How the Library Moved a Community Pre-Baccalaureate Information Literacy Course to an Online, Flipped Environement

      Shipman, Peter; Mears, Kim; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2014)
      Presentation from the 2014 Medical Library Association Southern Chapter Annual Meeting.
    • Importance of Chapter Membership: a 20-year Data Analysis

      Bandy, Sandra L.; Mears, Kim; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2012-10)
      This project analyzes 20 years of recorded membership data from the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association (SC/MLA). Outcomes will illustrate trends in membership.
    • Information Literacy/Information Architecture: Lessons Learned from a Card Sort Exercise

      Feher, Virginia; Mears, Kim; Johnson, Autumn; Reese Library (Georgia Regents University, 2013-08-23)
    • Librarian Contributions to a Revamped Open-Access Public Health Journal

      Ballance, Darra; Mears, Kim; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2017-05)
      Objectives: :To improve the quality of a recently revived online journal, publishing original research in public health. Methods: A health sciences librarian who is embedded in an academic public health institute was asked to assist in the preparation of a recently revived journal for application for review by NLM and the DOAJ. The public health institute serves as the academic partner to a state public health association, which published the journal from 2006-2009. The journal was revived by the institute and association as an open access publication in 2015. The institute, and the association’s board of directors, were very interested in increasing the scholarly value and impact of their publication. Results: Reviewing NLM’s application for indexing in MEDLINE led the librarian (and a colleague) to contribute to additional enhancements: the establishment of a secure archival site, selecting a Creative Commons license, adhering to Open Access ideals, and obtaining a Crossref account for DOIs for each article. The librarian applied to Thomson/Reuters for the journal’s inclusion in the Science Citation Index as a “regional journal.” The journal is in final consideration for inclusion in the DOAJ; applications to NLM and Thomson are awaiting decisions. The librarian works closely with administrative staff as each issue is published to ensure DOIs are assigned correctly. Conclusion: This ongoing project has enhanced the embedded librarian’s value to the public health institute and assisted in the scholarly development of the journal. Design improvements to the web site are being suggested by the librarian and will be submitted to the institute’s director. The institute has begun a research study on state public health associations and barriers to publishing state-level public health research; the librarian is included on the research team for this project as well.
    • Library on Demand: Developing an Education Outreach Webinar Series

      Mears, Kim; Davies, Kathy J; Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Stuart, Ansley; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Objectives: To describe a collaborative project to host live and recorded instructional webinars; To highlight specific information resources; To promote underused library services Methods: Surveyed library employees to identify potential webinar topics; Established a priority order of topics and a calendar for the webinar series; Identified the technology platforms and best practices for online instruction delivery; Committee members provided technical assistance for both viewers and lecturers, coordinated scheduling, and served as instructors; Created a checklist for promotional procedures Results: Webinar series launched in August 2014; Topics scheduled bimonthly; Recorded webinars available on LibGuide as well as the Libraries’ YouTube channel; 1032 views of the series content since the creation of the LibGuide from June 2014 – March 2016 Conclusions: Developing an online webinar series proved to be a viable method to expand the Libraries’ educational program across campuses and increase librarian technology skills; Future directions include identifying topics and collaboration with the undergraduate library
    • Makerspace Mania! Developing a Makerspace in a Health Sciences Library

      Mears, Kim; Logue, Natalie; Kouame, Gail; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2017-04)
      Objectives: To advance the clinical and educational objectives of the university and to foster innovation by developing a makerspace in the health sciences library. Methods: A committee of three librarians investigated models of makerspaces in health sciences libraries and evaluated the current needs of faculty and staff for 3D printing and data visualization. A proposal was developed in three phases: information gathering, in-depth interviews, and cost-benefit analysis of equipment and program development. Results: During the information gathering stage, the committee reviewed a variety of sources such as websites, white papers, and listserv discussion threads on makerspaces in health sciences and academic libraries. Interviews were conducted with educational technology staff, health sciences faculty, research administration personnel, and a community technology hub. Equipment recommendations were selected during the cost-benefit analysis, which weighed the initial and continuing costs of equipment, the long-term goals of the makerspace, and the needs of the students and faculty. Location and training needs were also included in the proposal recommendations. Implementation of the makerspace is ongoing. Conclusions: Health sciences libraries are becoming more active in the development and implementation of makerspaces in health sciences libraries. Future considerations for the Greenblatt Library makerspace include outreach and promotion and the development of a sustainable funding model.
    • The Many Faces of Embedded Librarianship: How do we Evaluate Effectiveness?

      Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Davies, Kathy J; Mears, Kim; Shipman, Peter; Gaines, Julie K.; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2014)
      Presentation from the 2014 Medical Library Association Southern Chapter Annual Meeting.
    • The New Normal at GRU Libraries: Managing Change/Seeking Innovation

      Feher, Virginia; Davies, Kathy J; Verburg, Fay L; McCarrell, Kyle; Mears, Kim; Reese Library (Georgia Regents University, 2013-05-16)
      On January 8th 2013, Augusta State University and Georgia Health Sciences University consolidated to form Georgia Regents University. With this consolidation, ASU Reese Library and GHSU Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library administratively combined. The two libraries serve very different user populations. Reese provides access to a broad range of information resources for undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and community users. Greenblatt provides access to evidence-based resources in support of teaching, research, and clinical care for students, faculty, community users, and the GRU Health System. As part of the consolidation process, Reese and Greenblatt faculty and staff collaborated on reconciling differences in policies, procedures, service models, collection development, and library governance, all while seeking opportunities to enhance and innovate services. In this panel presentation, Reese and Greenblatt librarians will address challenges faced in the consolidation process, including combining GIL catalogs, expanding the liaison program, planning a consolidated website, and learning how to navigate differences in organizational culture.
    • ORCID Implementation at Georgia Regents University

      Mears, Kim; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2015-05-17)
      ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) offers a solution to name ambiguity within the publishing world, as well as a method for scholars to maintain a professional record of scholarly activities. The Georgia Regents University Libraries facilitated the adoption and integration of ORCID throughout the GRU campus community by actively engaging faculty and graduate students, as well as integrating ORCID into key university systems. The library collaborated with the University’s Department of Human Resources (HR) and BioMed Central to enhance the adoption and integration of ORCID identifiers in university systems, including the institution’s digital repository, Scholarly Commons, and the University’s Human Resources Management System (HRMS). The library has also begun to focus on educating graduate students on the benefits of ORCID as they begin to build their research portfolio. Librarians can assist their institution in improving research information infrastructure and ORCID is unique because it is the only researcher identifier integrated into grant and manuscript submission systems. This project benefits researchers and the University by increasing the adoption and use of ORCID identifiers and supporting efforts to reduce confusion in regards to common or international names. This is especially important when scholarly productivity has a direct impact on promotion and tenure. ORCID integration in Scholarly Commons was completed in September 2014. Successes and challenges along with the librarians’ educational efforts to introduce ORCID will be reviewed.
    • Piloting an Online Evidence-Based Practice Course for Nurses

      Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay; Augusta University (2016-05)
    • Reference for the Remote User Through Embedded Librarianship

      Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Mears, Kim; Johnson, Melissa; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library; Walter M. Bortz III Library; Reese Library; Georgia Regents University; Hampden-Sydney College (Taylor & Francis, 2016-02)
      Embedded librarians serve an important role in assisting remote users. Despite the varying degrees of embeddedness, all maintain the goal of ensuring the same high quality reference and instruction services that users have come to expect from the traditional library setting. Embedded librarians select and use technology that most effectively meets the needs of this unique user group. This technology can include the library website, course management systems, research guides, lecture and screen capture software, remote reference (including telephone, chat, and email), web conferencing, online survey tools, citation management, and social media. [NOTE: This is an electronic version of an article published in The Reference Librarian, 2016, VOL. 57, NO. 3, 165–181. This article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02763877.2015.1131658.]
    • Research Information Architect: Building Research Information Infrastructure through ORCID Integration in University Systems

      Mears, Kim; Bandy, Sandra L.; Seago, Brenda L; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Georgia Regents University, 2014-10-17)
      ORCID iDs (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) provide authors with an international digital identifier to aid in maintaining a professional record of scholarly activities. The University Libraries sought to enhance the University’s information infrastructure through the integration of ORCID identifiers in key systems, including the institution’s digital repository, Scholarly Commons, and the PeopleSoft Human Resources Management System (HRMS).
    • University Libraries Makerspace Proposal

      Mears, Kim; Logue, Natalie; Kouame, Gail (2017-01)
      A committee of three librarians created this proposal in response to Libraries administration's request to research a possible Makerspace for the Greenblatt Library. The proposal included a review of makerspaces in health sciences libraries, ideas on how to set up and manage such a space, equipment recommendations, and the location of the makerspace within the Greenblatt Library.
    • When libraries combine: Creating a Georgia Regents University Libraries website

      Mears, Kim; Feher, Virginia (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2015-09-29)
      This paper is chapter 12 within the book Difficult decisions: Closing and merging academic libraries (S. Holder & A. Lannon (Eds.)). This publication explores all of these aspects of library consolidation through commentary, research, and case studies written by librarians with experience navigating these events. Individual chapters address either the entire process of a consolidation or closure, multiple aspects of one or more experiences, or one aspect that is particularly important such as communicating with faculty or using data to make decisions about collections. Difficult Decisions: Closing And Merging Academic Libraries is a comprehensive resource for library administrators faced with making these decisions, librarians asked to assist with these challenging projects, and anyone working in a library undergoing a merger.