• Back to the Basics!: Career Development for Early Career Librarians Through SubjectIntensive Conferences

      Logue, Natalie; Stuart, Ansley (2017-05)
      To assess a subject intensive conference for career development benefits among librarians with less than 5 years of professional experience.
    • Engaging Pre-College Students in Health Sciences Research

      Logue, Natalie; Stuart, Ansley; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective: This presentation will show how to engage, assess, and educate pre-college students in a pipeline program in-person and online.Methods: The pipeline program targets juniors and seniors from local high schools who are interested in pursuing a health sciences career. This summer long program provides credit and non-credit instruction courses modelled after medical education programs to simulate what the students will experience in higher education. Part of the non-credit instruction is an information literacy course that is taught by two librarians from the health sciences library. This course focuses on introductory information search skills, health sciences specific databases, and indexing. Many of the students begin the course without previous health literacy skills but are expected to write and present on a health disparities topic by the end of the nine-week program. The Information Literacy course is presented to both in-person and online groups and were initially taught simultaneously for convenience and consistency. The two groups were split in Summer of 2017 due to ongoing technical difficulties, student engagement concerns, and poor student comprehension. Results: By focusing on the in-person and online groups separately, the librarians were able to better utilize group discussion and online tools to increase student participation. The immediate result of separating the class components was a reduction in wasted class time for the in-person instruction waiting for online students to login and respond. Additionally, tools such as online discussion boards and surveys, were better utilized to engage distance students. Conclusions: Separating the class component saw an increase in the student engagement over the course of the summer and allowed for better assessment of student comprehension through pre and post testing. Additional conclusions from the Summer 2018 will be included.
    • It's a Stress-Free World After All! Strategies for a Successful Finals Frenzy Program

      Logue, Natalie; Hendren, Stephanie; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective: This poster examines ways to implement and support a Finals Frenzy program focused on reducing stress and supporting study focus in a health sciences library during finals period using non-library funding. Methods: Each Fall and Spring semester, the health sciences library organizes a four to five day program aimed at supporting students during their finals study period with the goal of relieving stress and increasing student awareness of library support and resources. This program is led by an ad hoc committee consisting of the Access Services librarian, an additional librarian, and a staff member. The objectives of the committee are to establish a daily schedule of events, itemize purchases, and generate marketing material. Funding for the events is requested from the Student Activity Fees committee, a University Committee charged with the distribution of student fees. Each year, the library needs to apply for funding and present their budget proposal to the committee. Results: The library budget proposal for 2017-2018 was carried over from previous years based on past event programming and student turnout. Ongoing assessment of previous events highlighted an opportunity to modify the program to better meet student needs. Spring 2018 events were scheduled a week earlier, and four days longer, than originally planned and an additional funding opportunity was identified within student fees. In addition to funded events, the library utilized volunteer services such as therapy dogs, and supplies purchased from previous years. Conclusions: The library saw a 52% increase in student attendance between Fall 2017 and Spring 2018. While funding helped in implementation, reviewing event statistics and researching similar programs to adjust the timing and schedule of events were key factors in increasing student participation.
    • Makerspace Mania! Developing a Makerspace in a Health Sciences Library

      Mears, Kim; Logue, Natalie; Kouame, Gail; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2017-04)
      Objectives: To advance the clinical and educational objectives of the university and to foster innovation by developing a makerspace in the health sciences library. Methods: A committee of three librarians investigated models of makerspaces in health sciences libraries and evaluated the current needs of faculty and staff for 3D printing and data visualization. A proposal was developed in three phases: information gathering, in-depth interviews, and cost-benefit analysis of equipment and program development. Results: During the information gathering stage, the committee reviewed a variety of sources such as websites, white papers, and listserv discussion threads on makerspaces in health sciences and academic libraries. Interviews were conducted with educational technology staff, health sciences faculty, research administration personnel, and a community technology hub. Equipment recommendations were selected during the cost-benefit analysis, which weighed the initial and continuing costs of equipment, the long-term goals of the makerspace, and the needs of the students and faculty. Location and training needs were also included in the proposal recommendations. Implementation of the makerspace is ongoing. Conclusions: Health sciences libraries are becoming more active in the development and implementation of makerspaces in health sciences libraries. Future considerations for the Greenblatt Library makerspace include outreach and promotion and the development of a sustainable funding model.
    • Making Magic: Fostering Innovation with a Creative Technology Lab in the Health Sciences Library

      Logue, Natalie; Kouame, Gail; Askew, Bettina; Nogales, Vonny; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective:To offer creative technology services in a health sciences library for innovation and prototyping. Methods: An academic health sciences library implemented a new maker space, the Creative Technology Lab (CTL), as part of a major renovation project in 2017/2018. The Creative Technology Lab provides 3D scanning and printing services, a Cricut machine, circuitry kits, and a lamination machine, with a high-definition data visualization display coming in the next year. Initial planning for the CTL focused primarily on 3D printing and scanning. The space allocated for the CTL was not ready during early phases of the renovation, so the 3D scanning and printing equipment was placed in another work area to allow library personnel to become familiar with how to use the equipment and accompanying software. The CTL Committee developed policies and procedures and posted job request forms to the library’s web page prior to the final placement of the 3D equipment in the CTL space. Interest and some requests immediately surfaced when equipment became available in the library.Results:When the CTL final location was unveiled, requests for 3D scanning and printing increased notably. The CTL is located directly inside the library’s main entrance and has a bank of windows,making it highly visible. In addition, the committee produced marketing materials and presented on the CTL in an online tutorial and at local faculty showcases. Faculty members and students from multiple disciplines have produced 3D printed tools and educational models. Conclusions:Having the Creative Technology Lab as a service at the health sciences library allows for the library to increase its visibility on campus to new users seeking to produce both prototypes and objects for practical uses. The biggest challenge for users of the CTL is understanding the technology and software, so providing feedback on designs and discussing project ideas has been repeatedly requested.
    • Serving Today's Students While Creating the Library of Tomorrow

      Logue, Natalie; Seago, Brenda L; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Methods: An academic health sciences library received funding to initiate a major renovation project. In early stages of the project, library leadership and the Access Services Librarian had regular meetings with the design team to discuss possible floor plans and furniture needs. Student needs were in the forefront of discussions and guided planning to meet both practical needs and desired aesthetic upgrades. Throughout the renovation, the library provided announcements, signage, and online updates to keep stakeholders apprised of progress and affected areas. As demolition began, noise, dust and debris became concerns. The library worked with the construction managers repeatedly to reduce the stress and disruption for students, including planning for when certain construction activities could take place and providing regular communication.Results: The library has a new public service desk, new carpeting and flooring, compact shelving, upgraded restrooms, a new Creative Technology Lab (a maker space), and more open floor space. Space is reallocated to allow for more group study and clearer access to service areas such as the Research & Education Services office suite and the Historical Collections and Archives. Visitors to the library expressed interest and approval of the changes in the library. Suggestions for new areas and concerns about the changing space have been shared with the library verbally, via email, and through an anonymous comment system. Conclusions:Renovation of an occupied, high-use building on an academic campus provides many challenges, but can be accomplished in a way that responds to students’ needs. Library personnel’s frequent consultations with construction team members is essential for the success of a renovation project. The new space aligns with student requests and future student and faculty needs for technology, collaborative work, and knowledge discovery.
    • Streamlining the Library System: Preparing for the Next-generation

      Logue, Natalie; Bandy, Sandra L.; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2017-05)
      Objectives: This presentation examines challenges the only health sciences library system faced during the migration of a state-wide consortium from Ex Libris Voyager to Alma. Alma is a cloud-based system constructed for print, OER, and digital collections that will allow the institution to grow beyond Voyager, which is nearing the end of its lifecycle. Methods: A library team of Access Services and Content Management librarians and staff was formed to manage the data cleanup and implementation process. Members of this team were also involved in consortium committees which communicated problems and solutions between the 29 consortium institutions. Ex Libris provided the library with 59 data cleanup tasks and accompanying SQL report queries to systematically evaluate the library’s current integrated library system. The implementation team met weekly to review reports and determine best practices for the data to migrate correctly over to Alma. Data cleanup reports indicated that several groups of data were inconsistent with the libraries best practices within patron records and cataloging records including item holdings. Report findings identified instances of human error, opportunities for improved organization, and methods of preservation for NLM classification cataloging records. Results: Of the 59 data cleanup tasks, 39 were determined to be applicable to the health sciences library. Best practices established include reducing the number of patron groups, item locations, and item types. Some cleanup tasks required little work as others were more time consuming. The library identified over 500 patron records that were duplicate or inactive for three or more years and were deleted from the current system. Over 700 cataloging records with mismatched locations and holding records with missing items were identified and corrected. Two solutions were also identified to insure the health sciences NLM classification subject headings would migrate over to the Alma environment. Conclusion: The Alma ILS is built to accommodate physical and electronic records and manage patron records externally. The data cleanup tasks most significantly prepared library data to migrate successfully into a new organization and cataloging model, but also established new best practices for Alma and eliminated messy and outdated records. Preparing to migrate from one integrated library system to another, the library reviewed numerous patron records and cataloging records cleaning them up so unnecessary data would not transfer. Upon completing these tasks, the library is equipped to move to the next step of validating content in the new system.
    • University Libraries Makerspace Proposal

      Mears, Kim; Logue, Natalie; Kouame, Gail (2017-01)
      A committee of three librarians created this proposal in response to Libraries administration's request to research a possible Makerspace for the Greenblatt Library. The proposal included a review of makerspaces in health sciences libraries, ideas on how to set up and manage such a space, equipment recommendations, and the location of the makerspace within the Greenblatt Library.