• Boldly Going To New Horizons: Engaging the Community in Biomedical Research and Precision Medicine

      Shipman, Peter; Kouame, Gail; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective:To adapt a traditional consumer health information outreach approach to include a community health education message targeting the benefits for the general public of participation in biomedical research. Methods: An outreach award led to the expansion of a traditional consumer health information message to include the basics of biomedical research and informed consent. Urban, suburban, and rural public libraries and Federally Qualified Health Centers in eastern and central Georgia will host ten consumer health presentations by medical librarians. Presentations will have three themes: becoming well-informed about disease conditions and medications using MedlinePlus, understanding the process and benefits of biomedical research studies, and use the All of Us research program as an example of a new type of precision medicine study that recruits partners (not subjects) from populations that do not traditionally participate in research. The importance of understanding the risks and benefits of enrolling in a research study will be discussed. Results: To be determined.
    • Exploring Best Practices for Librarian Integration into Case-Based Small Group Learning

      Kouame, Gail; Gaines, Julie K.; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objectives:To explore best practices for integrating health sciences librarians in case-based learning in undergraduate medical education. Methods: A group of health sciences librarians and medical educators performed a study and analyzed first and second year medical students’ use of resources in small group case-based learning experiences. Librarian activities included collecting students’ learning objective presentations, evaluating and critiquing the resources cited, and providing written feedback. Librarians also performed in-person observations of small group presentations and gave input to students. In this study, the librarians discovered gaps in information seeking skills on the part of the students as well as faculty small group facilitators. Facilitators acknowledged a need for training and reminders about effective searching. Librarians identified ways to equip students and faculty facilitators with improved searching and critical appraisal skills. Results: Librarian presence in the small groups reminded facilitators to prompt students to assess the quality of the resources they consult to answer scenario-based questions. Plans are underway to develop more structured training for facilitators and explore meaningful assignments for students to reinforce critical thinking while searching for health information. One librarian, as part of a teaching fellowship project, was invited to teach a session on searching and critical appraisal skills to faculty small group facilitators for an orientation session at the beginning of the 2018-2019 academic year. A needs assessment will also be developed for the small group facilitators to determine their needs for developing information seeking skills and best ways to leverage librarian expertise. Conclusion: The presence of the librarians in the small group prompted both students and faculty facilitators to consider the quality of information resources which are important for clinical reasoning skills for their future clinical work.
    • The Future Is Now: Using Secure Tablet Technology to Promote Health Literacy and Self-Care for Incarcerated Persons

      Kouame, Gail; Johnson, J. Aaron; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective: To engage incarcerated individuals with health information and education to enhance their knowledge and use of health resources and services. Methods: A health sciences librarian and a Public Health Institute applied for an NLM Information Resources Grant to Reduce Health Disparities. The team was awarded funding to provide quality education to incarcerated persons through secure tablet computers. The tablets are currently deployed in 83 jails and prisons in 25 states, and are designed for self-guided learning experiences for low literacy individuals. Project leaders established agreements with five corrections facilities to use the tablets to conduct a health information needs assessment of individuals preparing for re-entry into the community. The study population includes both males and females. The results of the needs assessment informed the creation of health literacy training modules made available using the tablets. People incarcerated in the participating facilities consented to participate in the study to determine the impact of having access to the training modules. Results: Data from the needs assessment indicates that top places respondents seek health information are: the internet; a doctor or health care provider; or health web sites. When asked where they went first the last time they looked for health information, respondents stated they went to: the internet; the doctor or a health care provider; and health or medical organizations. They expressed interest in learning about health insurance issues. Other topics in which they expressed a desire to learn more include: understanding laboratory test results; getting help for addiction problems; and how to find a doctor or nurse. They indicated they would like to know how to take better care of themselves and manage health problems; how to improve eating habits and nutrition; and how to find help to prevent health problems and illnesses. Preliminary data from pre- and post-intervention will be presented.
    • Makerspace Mania! Developing a Makerspace in a Health Sciences Library

      Mears, Kim; Logue, Natalie; Kouame, Gail; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2017-04)
      Objectives: To advance the clinical and educational objectives of the university and to foster innovation by developing a makerspace in the health sciences library. Methods: A committee of three librarians investigated models of makerspaces in health sciences libraries and evaluated the current needs of faculty and staff for 3D printing and data visualization. A proposal was developed in three phases: information gathering, in-depth interviews, and cost-benefit analysis of equipment and program development. Results: During the information gathering stage, the committee reviewed a variety of sources such as websites, white papers, and listserv discussion threads on makerspaces in health sciences and academic libraries. Interviews were conducted with educational technology staff, health sciences faculty, research administration personnel, and a community technology hub. Equipment recommendations were selected during the cost-benefit analysis, which weighed the initial and continuing costs of equipment, the long-term goals of the makerspace, and the needs of the students and faculty. Location and training needs were also included in the proposal recommendations. Implementation of the makerspace is ongoing. Conclusions: Health sciences libraries are becoming more active in the development and implementation of makerspaces in health sciences libraries. Future considerations for the Greenblatt Library makerspace include outreach and promotion and the development of a sustainable funding model.
    • Making Magic: Fostering Innovation with a Creative Technology Lab in the Health Sciences Library

      Logue, Natalie; Kouame, Gail; Askew, Bettina; Nogales, Vonny; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective:To offer creative technology services in a health sciences library for innovation and prototyping. Methods: An academic health sciences library implemented a new maker space, the Creative Technology Lab (CTL), as part of a major renovation project in 2017/2018. The Creative Technology Lab provides 3D scanning and printing services, a Cricut machine, circuitry kits, and a lamination machine, with a high-definition data visualization display coming in the next year. Initial planning for the CTL focused primarily on 3D printing and scanning. The space allocated for the CTL was not ready during early phases of the renovation, so the 3D scanning and printing equipment was placed in another work area to allow library personnel to become familiar with how to use the equipment and accompanying software. The CTL Committee developed policies and procedures and posted job request forms to the library’s web page prior to the final placement of the 3D equipment in the CTL space. Interest and some requests immediately surfaced when equipment became available in the library.Results:When the CTL final location was unveiled, requests for 3D scanning and printing increased notably. The CTL is located directly inside the library’s main entrance and has a bank of windows,making it highly visible. In addition, the committee produced marketing materials and presented on the CTL in an online tutorial and at local faculty showcases. Faculty members and students from multiple disciplines have produced 3D printed tools and educational models. Conclusions:Having the Creative Technology Lab as a service at the health sciences library allows for the library to increase its visibility on campus to new users seeking to produce both prototypes and objects for practical uses. The biggest challenge for users of the CTL is understanding the technology and software, so providing feedback on designs and discussing project ideas has been repeatedly requested.
    • Patient Encounter: Using Virtual EHR To Integrate Library Resources With Second Year Medical Students

      Davies, Kathy J; Bandy, Sandra L.; Kouame, Gail; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective Library faculty collaborated to explore new teaching approaches to illustrate student use of library resources in simulated clinical settings with standardized patients. Methods: Librarians co-developed clinical scenarios in collaboration with medical educators to connect library resources to standardized patient experiences for second-year students. Students interviewed standardized patients and used critical thinking to diagnosis the condition, guided by a librarian and clinical facilitator. In real time, students selected appropriate evidence-based medicine resources to complete the course assignment. The patient scenarios were adjusted with each teaching session, this year incorporating simulated patient electronic health records (EHR). Students incorporated library resources at each stage to evaluate the provided patient’s history, prescriptions, and clinical results to determine diagnosis and treatment. Results: The clinical scenarios illustrated how to use library resources effectively in a “real world” setting. In previous years, students distributed searching of the resources among the team members rather than completing the evidence-based process as a cohesive unit. The implementation of the virtual EHR reversed this trend with students working together to address each component of the standardized patient encounter. The students were more engaged with the recent changes and expressed greater understanding of library resources. Library faculty gained deeper knowledge of how clinicians and students view library resources use for evidence-based practice. Conclusions: Students utilized the opportunity to practice information seeking skills within a mock clinical setting and gained more experience using patient care tools. Knowledge of clinical library resources increased amongst the students with the recent insertion of the virtual EHR within the standardized patient experience.
    • Shaping the Future of Education for the Medical Library Association

      Kouame, Gail; Holmes, Heather; Laera, Elizabeth; Augusta University; Medical University of South Carolina; Brookwood Baptist Health (Augusta University, 2019-10-11)
      Objective: Inform health sciences information professionals about the newly developed structure for educational programming for the Medical Library Association (MLA) based on MLA’s Professional Competencies. Methods: MLA appointed the Education Steering Committee and six Education Curriculum Committees to develop education content based on the Association’s revised Professional Competencies. The Competencies provide the framework that define the skills to be gained as a result of educational offerings. The Education Curriculum Committees are charged with: 1. Designing and planning curriculum and educational offerings and resources; 2. Providing direction, expertise, and knowledge to creators and instructors of educational offerings with respect to content and instructional design; 3. Reviewing and assessing offerings to ensure they are high quality and current, meet learning outcomes, and have a succession plan. The work of the Curriculum Committees is shaped by the curriculum priorities document set forth by the Education Steering Committee, beginning with a “Bootcamp” that incorporates foundational offerings across the Competencies. Results: The Education Curriculum Committees suggest topics and speakers for MLA’s monthly webinars and for Continuing Education courses offered at the Association’s Annual Meetings. In the past year, Education Curriculum Committees have engaged with subject matter experts and with professional instructional designers to create online self-paced courses. A middle management symposium, sponsored by the Leadership & Management Education Curriculum Committee, was offered at the MLA 2019 Annual Meeting. Curriculum Committees are exploring other modes for providing educational content, such as podcasts, journal clubs or discussion groups. Existing courses and webinars are tagged with Professional Competencies in MEDLIB-ED, MLA’s continuing education portal. Conclusions: MLA’s Professional Competencies provide a meaningful framework for planning and organizing educational offerings. Education Curriculum Committees follow the curriculum priorities to plan their work, but also have flexibility to be innovative in suggesting other possible content and methods to support professional development and education for information professionals.
    • University Libraries Makerspace Proposal

      Mears, Kim; Logue, Natalie; Kouame, Gail (2017-01)
      A committee of three librarians created this proposal in response to Libraries administration's request to research a possible Makerspace for the Greenblatt Library. The proposal included a review of makerspaces in health sciences libraries, ideas on how to set up and manage such a space, equipment recommendations, and the location of the makerspace within the Greenblatt Library.
    • Using Journal Club to Upgrade Pediatric Residents' Understanding of Evidence-Based Practice

      Hendren, Stephanie; Kouame, Gail; Stuart, Ansley; Shipman, Peter; Ballance, Darra; Yang, Rebecca; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (Augusta University, 2018-11-19)
      Objective: To demonstrate how a change from a traditional journal club to an evidence-based assignment in a pediatric hospital strengthened collaboration between hospital residents and medical librarians. Methods: The pediatric department at Augusta University Medical Center decided to revise their existing journal club model to better meet requirements for evidence-based practice content. They approached the Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library to collaborate on a new approach to the assignment. Each third-year resident selected a patient they treated to develop a PICO question, research the literature, and present the findings. The librarians, on average, rounded twice and had an additional meeting with each resident in order to complete the assignment. Librarians worked with the residents in developing answerable research questions, searching the databases, and providing methods to analyze results. Results: The first cohort of 13 residents completed their assignments. At the end of each rotation, the resident presented the patient and findings to the other residents and attending physicians at a designated morning report. Residents also discussed how the literature did or did not apply to their particular patient scenario, and whether the standard hospital procedure was in line with the published evidence. A group discussion about the presented literature directly followed each presentation. Afterwards, a librarian evaluated each resident on specific EBM competencies. Conclusions: The evidence-based assignment offers a different way to engage residents with medical literature and librarians outside a journal club. Residents gained hands-on experience of searching the literature for a specific patient problem and had a platform to share their knowledge with their peers. Librarians utilized the one-on-one interactions to provide tailored literature search instruction based upon the resident’s research topic and results found. A second cohort began in July 2018 and will continue through June 2019.