• Adapting an embedded model of librarianship, college by college.

      Blake, Lindsay; Mears, Kim; Davies, Kathy J; Ballance, Darra; Shipman, Peter; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Gaines, Julie K.; Georgia Regents University (Taylor & Francis, 2014-07-14)
      Librarians are increasingly moving out of the library and into the wider university setting as patrons spend more time seeking information online and less time visiting the library. The move to embed librarians in colleges, departments, or customer groups has been going on for some time but has recently received more attention as libraries work to find new ways to reach patrons that no longer need to come to the physical library. Few universities have attempted to embed all their librarians. This case study describes how one group of health sciences librarians dispersed its professional staff throughout its campuses and medical centers.
    • Building a DREAM: Medical Librarians Collaborating in the Creation of an Assessment Database

      Blake, Lindsay; Davies, Kathy J; University Libraries (2014-05)
      Program Objective: The DREAM (Directory and Repository of Educational Assessment Measures) project built a repository of peer-reviewed assessment measures used in health sciences education. Program: Librarians collaborated with the school of medicine’s educational department, the Educational Innovation Institute (EII), to create a medical assessment database, DREAM. The DREAM database is hosted within the MedEdPORTAL on the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) website. Librarians tailored searches to the six main Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies. The librarians worked closely with the DREAM project coordinator to craft PubMed searches that would find a variety of assessment tools for students and residents clustered around the six competencies. The searches were combed for Psychometrically Evidenced, Appearing Repeatedly in a Literature Search (PEARLS). PEARLS were sent out to reviewers, who prepared a critical analysis. A Critical Synthesis Package, which includes librarian created indexing, is then placed on the DREAM site. Main Results: The DREAM initiative launched online officially in October 2013. The six ACGME searches will be expanded to cover the entire health sciences arena and social science databases. Librarians have become full-partners with the EII team on the DREAM project, designing not only searches, but providing feedback, participating in monthly meetings, and assisting as needed. DREAM has gained national attention and led to further Librarian involvement in projects on campus and for other organizations. Conclusion: The collaboration between the EII and the medical library is mutually beneficial. The medical librarians have gained national recognition for their inclusion in the DREAM project. The project has been presented at medical education and library conferences. Librarians are collaborating on an article with the EII DREAM team for publication in the medical education literature. Librarians have also improved on their searching skills in PubMed by expanding their knowledge of both MeSH and indexing. This has helped them to become more efficient and productive searchers.
    • Captured Memories Make History: Recording the Memories of Retirees for the Oral History Project of the Southern Chapter/MLA

      Kane, Laura T.; Price, Helvi McCall; Blake, Lindsay (2009-05)
      Beginning in the 1990's, the SC/MLA History Committee members recorded five oral histories. The transcriptions were stored in the Chapter archives. In 2003-2004 Richard Nollan, Chair and Laura Kane, a member of the Southern Chapter History Committee, resurrected the Oral History Project. More members were retiring, and it was felt that their memories of Southern Chapter events should be preserved. Committee members publicized the project and began a list of possible interviewees. They developed the first Oral History web page, displaying the original five oral histories. In 2006-2007 Laura Kane, then Chair of the History Committee, added new initiatives to the Oral History Project. An official list of interview questions was developed and added to the web page along with three new transcriptions of oral history interviews. Bernie Smith of the MLA Oral History Committee contacted Laura Kane to discuss collaborating on oral histories. The SC/MLA Oral History Committee was identified as the model for other Chapter oral history projects.
    • Creating a Mobile Library Website

      Cutshall, Tom; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Health Sciences University (Information Today, Inc., 2011-09)
      This article discusses the perceived need for a mobile library website, how the site was created and expansion of the site. This includes the technical and design information. Our setting is a health sciences university and hospital in Georgia. The project started with an informal poll of our patrons. We then looked at how other libraries were creating their mobile sites. It was decided to create a mobile website to accommodate our patrons and also take advantage of the vendor and consortium mobile products available to us. This allows us to take advantage of web based mobile products that are not applications, which already have a page on our website. We are now able to reach our patrons in a novel way that takes into consideration the explosion of smartphone usage and the variety of 12 smartphone platforms. Statistics show that our patrons are using the services and resources offered. As expected PubMed is receiving the highest number of hits, but our general health, nursing and drug databases are also showing good usage Our mobile site allows patrons to access the Library resources and services when and where they desire. The mobile site provides our patrons the flexibility to access our resources and services with a mobile device they probably already carry on their person. No need to find a laptop or head across campus to the library building for many library needs.
    • Creating a Mobile Library Website

      Cutshall, Tom; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Health Sciences University (Information Today, Inc., 2011-10)
      Question/Objective: Discuss the perceived need for a mobile library website, how the site was created and expansion of the site. This includes the technical and design information. Setting or Participants: A health sciences university and hospital in Georgia. Methodology: The project started with an informal poll of our patrons. We then looked at how other libraries were creating their mobile sites. It was decided to create a mobile website to accommodate our patrons and also take advantage of the vendor and consortium mobile products available to us. This allows us to take advantage of web based mobile products that are not applications, which already have a page on our website. We are now able to reach our patrons in a novel way that takes into consideration the explosion of smartphone usage and the variety of 12 smartphone platforms. Findings: Statistics show that our patrons are using the services and resources offered. As expected PubMed is receiving the highest number of hits, but our general health, nursing and drug databases are also showing good usage Conclusion: Our mobile site allows patrons to access the Library resources and services when and where they desire. The mobile site provides our patrons the flexibility to access our resources and services with a mobile device they probably already carry on their person. No need to find a laptop or head across campus to the library building for many library needs.
    • Designing a DREAM Database and Delivering TIME Competency Measures: Library Faculty Integration in Medical Education Assessment

      Davies, Kathy J; Blake, Lindsay; Georgia Regents University (2013-10)
      Purpose: This paper describes librarian roles as full partners in creating a database of health sciences education assessment instruments (DREAM) and locating instruments to measure medical student milestones for the Transformation in Medical Education (TIME) initiative to design a competency based medical education curriculum. Setting/Participants: A research university with an academic health sciences center and undergraduate liberal arts and sciences campus. Librarians partnered with faculty in the institution’s Educational Innovation Institute to develop the DREAM database and serve as members of the TIME project consultation team. Methods: Library faculty tailored PubMed searches for assessment instruments linked to ACGME competencies. Librarians and research faculty determined that a public searchable database of free, validated, and peer- reviewed assessment tools would fill an existing information gap. The DREAM database was presented at the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) Annual Meeting and is now hosted on MedEdPORTAL at the AAMC website. Lead faculty members of the TIME project then contacted the DREAM team to request consultation on identifying assessment instruments. Librarians will complete assessment searching based around 12 main competency areas with over 100 student achievement milestones. Results: Library faculty developed assessment filters for MEDLINE and CINAHL and adapted them as needed for competency search processes. The next phase was developing the database taxonomy from existing controlled vocabulary resources. Library faculty assisted in creating peer review forms and determining database record format. Identifying TIME competency assessment tools required developing over 60 comprehensive searches focusing on specific student behaviors. Intensive searching of health sciences databases has led librarians to develop a better grasp of medical education and assessment terminology and article indexing. Conclusions: DREAM is scheduled for a fall launch; TIME reports will be completed during the winter of 2013. The DREAM team will monitor the database and library faculty will design search strategies to identify additional assessment instruments. Library faculty can be fully integrated in research and assessment initiatives. Collaboration with EII faculty has brought librarians additional referrals and provided opportunities to assist in projects benefiting the library, university and our own careers.
    • Developing Information Analysis Mastery: Blending Bioinformatics and Evidence Based Searching

      Blake, Lindsay; Davies, Kathy J; Yang, Frances; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2014)
      Presentation from the 2014 Medical Library Association Southern Chapter Annual Meeting.
    • Embedded Librarians: Collaborations in Research and Teaching

      Gaines, Julie K.; Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay; Davies, Kathy J; Shipman, Peter; Ballance, Darra; Seago, Brenda L; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia Regents University, 2013-03)
      The increased use of online information resources has allowed health sciences librarians to seek new roles outside of the physical library. A proactive approach is needed to provide information at the time and location of need. The Georgia Regents University (GRU) Librarians have responded to this shift by exploring a model of embedded librarianship that provides specialized assistance and deeper involvement at the college level. Embedded librarianship uses a service model that incorporates librarians as active university participants as opposed to the traditional role of service providers.
    • Evaluating an Embedded Program: Increasing Awareness, Expanding Services, and Fulfilling Patron Needs

      Ballance, Darra; Blake, Lindsay; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Introduction: Setting: Augusta University (AU), a comprehensive four-year university Nine colleges, an academic health center and over 8000 students. Campuses include the Health Sciences Campus, Undergraduate campus and Partnership Campus at the University of Georgia Three libraries (Greenblatt, Reese and the Partnership medical school) serve students, faculty and hospital staff. In 2012, Library administration, in collaboration with AU librarians, investigated a service model of librarian integration in their customers’ settings called embedded librarianship. Best practices suggested establishing office space for librarians among their designated customer groups. Once “embedded,” the librarian would become a part of customers’ daily activities and provide information support on-demand and in context. While there are descriptions of many facets of embedded librarian service, there is no comprehensive tool evaluating the activities of embedded librarians that can answer the question: how do patrons perceive the value of embedded librarian services? The embedded librarians at Augusta University sought to measure the awareness and perception of the new service model among clinicians, faculty, and students with a survey instrument. A validated instrument will assist in the proper implementation, maintenance, and evolution of an effective embedded service model.  Methods: Web-based survey, Likert scale and open-ended questions; Distributed by email in April 2015 using Qualtrics; All Augusta University students, full-time faculty, clinicians, and residents in areas where embedded librarians are assigned; Four colleges, two hospital departments, and one institute. Responses were solicited for four weeks; weekly reminder emails were sent, and the librarians personally encouraged participation from their embedded areas. The survey began by defining “embedded librarian.” Respondents who were unfamiliar with the program and unable to identify a librarian from the group were directed out of the survey.  The remaining respondents self-identified as a student, resident, clinician, or faculty member and then were routed to questions specific to their role. Students’ questions related to classwork and use of library resources; faculty questions related to teaching and research; and clinician/resident questions related to patient care and clinical training. Because most faculty also fulfill clinical roles, respondents who identified as faculty or clinician had the opportunity to answer both sets of questions. Results: The survey response rate was 10% with 381 completed forms from 4,408 survey recipients. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of respondents knew that an embedded program existed in their college or institute. 55% had worked with one or more librarians – in this question participants were asked to choose librarians by their picture and name. Of the 45% remaining, we asked why they had not had an opportunity to work with an embedded librarian. Responses indicated 1) Not aware or not known 2) Not doing research yet requiring that level of assistance, 3) have not needed one. The majority of faculty strongly agreed that embedded librarians saved them time and were an integral part of their group.  Analysis of locally collected data reveled that a high number of reference transactions occur in person which corresponds with survey results. Additional review of the data reflected an increasing trend toward librarian collaborations on grants, publications, and presentations. Conclusions: The survey suggests that perception - or how our patrons understand our role and value - may be the area needing the most improvement. To gauge perception of the program, the term “embedded librarian” was first clearly defined, then respondents were asked if they were aware that their college or department had an embedded librarian and finally to identify their embedded librarian from a photograph. It is important to note that all recipients of the survey belonged to a college or department with an embedded librarian. Of 381 responses, only 58% indicated that they were aware that their college or department had an embedded librarian, but nearly 74% were able to correctly identify their embedded librarian by photograph. This suggested that the embedded librarians were familiar faces within those colleges but there is a need to provide more education on embedded roles and services.
    • Expanding a Clinical Librarian Program

      Blake, Lindsay; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2014)
      Presentation from the 2014 Medical Library Association Southern Chapter Annual Meeting.
    • Improving Library Instruction Through a Faculty Teaching Fellowship

      Ballance, Darra; Blake, Lindsay; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2014)
      Presentation at the 2014 Medical Library Association Southern Chapter Annual Meeting
    • Library on Demand: Developing an Education Outreach Webinar Series

      Mears, Kim; Davies, Kathy J; Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Stuart, Ansley; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Objectives: To describe a collaborative project to host live and recorded instructional webinars; To highlight specific information resources; To promote underused library services Methods: Surveyed library employees to identify potential webinar topics; Established a priority order of topics and a calendar for the webinar series; Identified the technology platforms and best practices for online instruction delivery; Committee members provided technical assistance for both viewers and lecturers, coordinated scheduling, and served as instructors; Created a checklist for promotional procedures Results: Webinar series launched in August 2014; Topics scheduled bimonthly; Recorded webinars available on LibGuide as well as the Libraries’ YouTube channel; 1032 views of the series content since the creation of the LibGuide from June 2014 – March 2016 Conclusions: Developing an online webinar series proved to be a viable method to expand the Libraries’ educational program across campuses and increase librarian technology skills; Future directions include identifying topics and collaboration with the undergraduate library
    • The Many Faces of Embedded Librarianship: How do we Evaluate Effectiveness?

      Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Davies, Kathy J; Mears, Kim; Shipman, Peter; Gaines, Julie K.; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library (2014)
      Presentation from the 2014 Medical Library Association Southern Chapter Annual Meeting.
    • New Beginning for Clinical Librarians: Getting the Program off the Ground

      Blake, Lindsay; Gaines, Julie K.; UGA/GRU Partnership Campus; Georgia Regents University (2012-11)
      Question: How to integrate Librarians into existing clinical structures. Setting: Children’s and regional hospitals and clinics in Georgia where Georgia Health Sciences students and faculty are affiliated. Participants: Two Librarians at Georgia Health Sciences University located in two cities working with various hospital departments and faculty. Methods: Librarians work with departments in the hospitals and area clinics to integrate Evidence Based Medicine(EBM) and Patient and Family Centered Care(PFCC) into the medical student and resident education. Both of the Librarians are starting clinical librarian services. The services are in two different cities and stages in the medical education. One Librarian started in an established position working with residents and students in Family Medicine and Pediatrics, but had to rebuild after years of vacancy. The other Librarian is working with a new clerkship program so she is working directly with the clerkship directors to find ways to get involved with the students as they begin their clinical rotations. Main Finding: Librarians found various ways to assimilate themselves into the existing clinical structure. The methods they used varied by campus, hospital and/or department. Librarians were incorporated into a number of activities including: morning report, rounding, journal club, academic half days and scholarly projects. Conclusions: The Librarians found that various methods needed to be employed to incorporate their assistance in the hospital and clinical departments. The importance of communication and getting to know the clinical department environment and key players helps the Librarians to integrate into the structure.
    • On Campus or Out of Town: How Publishing Online Tutorials Can Help Your Patrons

      Blake, Lindsay; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Computers in Libraries, 2009-04)
      The article discusses online tutorials and publishing for distance-education programs of libraries. It is noted that online publishing is growing because of the emergence of online databases, electronic journals and electronic books. Libraries, on the other hand, prefer face-to-face teaching instead of online tutorial. It is recommended that libraries determine which topics to tackle in tutorials before developing them.
    • Piloting an Online Evidence-Based Practice Course for Nurses

      Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay; Augusta University (2016-05)
    • Rhabdomyolysis after spin class?

      Parmar, Simrat; Chauhan, Bindiya; DuBose, Jacqueline; Blake, Lindsay; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library; Department of Family Medicine; Georgia Regents University (The Journal of Family Practice, 2012-10)
      Primary care physicians frequently encourage patients to lead a more active, healthy lifestyle. The rise in popularity of endurance events, yoga, and organized gym-based fitness classes has, no doubt, improved the health of those who participate. But what happens when an individual moves too quickly from a sedentary existence to a more physically active one?
    • Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in the Hospital and the Library: Two Different Groups, One Course

      Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra; Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 2013)
      Key roles in teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) are of interest to many hospital and academic librarians. This article describes how three academic librarians, in collaboration with the academic medical center's EBP Nursing Council, developed a seminar consisting of three credit hours of instruction in the basics of evidence-based practice. The seminar consists of three core elements: basic principles of EBP and finding literature, clinical experience and integration of knowledge into the hospital setting, and patient education and participation. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of the literature, institutional models of practice change, and the importance of patient roles in guideline development.
    • The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Medical Research versus Human Rights

      Blake, Lindsay (2010)
      The Tuskegee Syphilis Study of the Untreated Male Negro has become a landmark in medical history. Since the existence of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study became public knowledge in the 1970s it has been widely regarded as one of the most blatant examples of medical racism. Knowledge of the experiments is widespread throughout minority. The study has been blamed for low African American participation in medical research by creating distrust of the medical community. Because the study was funded by the Public Health Service (PHS) it has also created a climate of distrust of the government by poor and minority populations across the United States.
    • A Whole New Ballgame: Teaching Evidence Based Practice in the Hospital

      Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra; University Libraries (2012-05)
      Objective: A CE course was created for librarians and nurses to educate both groups on the use of Evidence-Based Practice in the hospital setting. We want to expand this course to suit other health professionals. Setting: A Health Sciences University in Georgia. Design: Three Librarians worked together to create a comprehensive review of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP). The course was created in three parts to cover the basics tenets of EBP, how to apply EBP to the hospital setting, and integrating patient preferences into EBP and patient care. MLA CE credit was obtained for Librarians and Georgia Nursing Association contact hours were obtained for nurses. Participants were given a pre-test and post. IRB approval was granted by the hospital and the academic institution. Findings: Through numerous classes taught to both nurses and librarians we found that EBP knowledge was improved after the 3 hour course. Comments revealed some areas for improvement. Both groups wanted more techniques for evaluating articles to determine if they are evidence-based and wanted more details on statistical information found in these articles. Nurses wanted more information on how to directly apply results, and how to conduct evidence-based research themselves. Conclusion: Because the use of EBP is spreading to more health professions, we are working on redesigning the course to appeal to a wider audience. Physicians have opportunities to receive EBM training, but there are fewer training avenues for nursing and allied health professionals outside of academia. We hope to redevelop our course to appeal to these groups and bring EBP from the colleges into the practice setting.