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dc.contributor.authorMattingly, Diana
dc.contributor.authorCrews, Lindsay K
dc.contributor.authorFlorentino-Pineda, Ivan
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-26T02:59:11Z
dc.date.available2013-02-26T02:59:11Z
dc.date.issued2010-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/951
dc.description.abstractWhile intranasal foreign bodies account for less than 1% of pediatric emergency room visits, proper diagnosis and management is critical to minimize significant morbidity and mortality. Intranasal button batteries in particular pose a significant threat to the pediatric population as nasal mucosal necrosis, septal perforation, facial cellulitis, and lateral nasal wall necrosis can occur within hours of insertion. The incidence of impacted button batteries has risen with the increased prevalence in common electronics like hearing aids, watches, and musical greeting cards. One study estimated that button batteries comprised 7% of intranasal foreign bodies removed from pediatric patients in a 6-month period. We report a case of intranasal button battery impaction in a 4-year-old male that resulted in significant tissue injury and required general anesthesia for extraction.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSociety for Pediatric Anesthesiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSPA;P-02
dc.subjectAnesthesiaen_US
dc.subjectPediatricen_US
dc.subjectSeptal perforationen_US
dc.subjectButton batteryen_US
dc.titleIntranasal Septal Perforation in a 4-Year-Old by an Impacted Button Battery: A Case Report and Review of the Literatureen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicineen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T07:07:40Z
html.description.abstractWhile intranasal foreign bodies account for less than 1% of pediatric emergency room visits, proper diagnosis and management is critical to minimize significant morbidity and mortality. Intranasal button batteries in particular pose a significant threat to the pediatric population as nasal mucosal necrosis, septal perforation, facial cellulitis, and lateral nasal wall necrosis can occur within hours of insertion. The incidence of impacted button batteries has risen with the increased prevalence in common electronics like hearing aids, watches, and musical greeting cards. One study estimated that button batteries comprised 7% of intranasal foreign bodies removed from pediatric patients in a 6-month period. We report a case of intranasal button battery impaction in a 4-year-old male that resulted in significant tissue injury and required general anesthesia for extraction.


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