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dc.contributor.authorGao, Li-Zhi
dc.contributor.authorXu, Hongyan
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-24T21:59:00Zen
dc.date.available2010-09-24T21:59:00Zen
dc.date.issued2008-02-13en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Evol Biol. 2008 Jan 16; 8:11en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2148en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18199337en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2148-8-11en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/92en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Mutation rate (mu) per generation per locus is an important parameter in the models of population genetics. Studies on mutation rate and its variation are of significance to elucidate the extent and distribution of genetic variation, further infer evolutionary relationships among closely related species, and deeply understand genetic variation of genomes. However, patterns of rate variation of microsatellite loci are still poorly understood in plant species. Furthermore, how their mutation rates vary in di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats within the species is largely uninvestigated across related plant genomes. RESULTS: Genome-wide variation of mutation rates was first investigated by means of the composite population parameter theta (theta = 4Nmu, where N is the effective population size and mu is the mutation rate per locus per generation) in four subspecies of Asian cultivated rice O. sativa and its three related species, O. rufipogon, O. glaberrima, and O. officinalis. On the basis of three data sets of microsatellite allele frequencies throughout the genome, population mutation rate (theta) was estimated for each locus. Our results reveal that the variation of population mutation rates at microsatellites within each studied species or subspecies of cultivated rice can be approximated with a gamma distribution. The mean population mutation rates of microsatellites do not significantly differ in motifs of di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats for the studied rice species. The shape parameter was also estimated for each subspecies of rice as well as other related rice species. Of them, different subspecies of O. sativa possesses similar shape parameters (alpha) of the gamma distribution, while other species extensively vary in their population mutation rates. CONCLUSION: Through the analysis of genome-wide microsatellite data, the population mutation rate can be approximately fitted with a gamma distribution in most of the studied species. In general, different population histories occurred along different lineages may result in the observed variation of population mutation rates at microsatellites among the studied Oryza species.
dc.rightsThe PMC Open Access Subset is a relatively small part of the total collection of articles in PMC. Articles in the PMC Open Access Subset are still protected by copyright, but are made available under a Creative Commons or similar license that generally allows more liberal redistribution and reuse than a traditional copyrighted work. Please refer to the license statement in each article for specific terms of use. The license terms are not identical for all articles in this subset.en_US
dc.subject.meshCrops, Agricultural / geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Molecularen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetics, Populationen_US
dc.subject.meshGenome, Planten_US
dc.subject.meshMicrosatellite Repeats / geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshMutationen_US
dc.subject.meshOryza sativa / geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificityen_US
dc.titleComparisons of mutation rate variation at genome-wide microsatellites: evolutionary insights from two cultivated rice and their wild relatives.en_US
dc.typeComparative Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2241587en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Biostatistics and Epidemiologyen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T01:34:45Z
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Mutation rate (mu) per generation per locus is an important parameter in the models of population genetics. Studies on mutation rate and its variation are of significance to elucidate the extent and distribution of genetic variation, further infer evolutionary relationships among closely related species, and deeply understand genetic variation of genomes. However, patterns of rate variation of microsatellite loci are still poorly understood in plant species. Furthermore, how their mutation rates vary in di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats within the species is largely uninvestigated across related plant genomes. RESULTS: Genome-wide variation of mutation rates was first investigated by means of the composite population parameter theta (theta = 4Nmu, where N is the effective population size and mu is the mutation rate per locus per generation) in four subspecies of Asian cultivated rice O. sativa and its three related species, O. rufipogon, O. glaberrima, and O. officinalis. On the basis of three data sets of microsatellite allele frequencies throughout the genome, population mutation rate (theta) was estimated for each locus. Our results reveal that the variation of population mutation rates at microsatellites within each studied species or subspecies of cultivated rice can be approximated with a gamma distribution. The mean population mutation rates of microsatellites do not significantly differ in motifs of di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats for the studied rice species. The shape parameter was also estimated for each subspecies of rice as well as other related rice species. Of them, different subspecies of O. sativa possesses similar shape parameters (alpha) of the gamma distribution, while other species extensively vary in their population mutation rates. CONCLUSION: Through the analysis of genome-wide microsatellite data, the population mutation rate can be approximately fitted with a gamma distribution in most of the studied species. In general, different population histories occurred along different lineages may result in the observed variation of population mutation rates at microsatellites among the studied Oryza species.


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