• BENZPYRENE HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY IN ISOLATED PARENCHYMAL AND NONPARENCHYMAL CELLS OF RAT LIVER

      Cantrell, Elroy; Bresnick, Edward; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (1972-02-1)
      Previous studies have implicated the reticuloendothelial cells of the liver in certain aspects of steroid metabolism. The similarity in the metabolism of steroids and polycyclic hydrocarbons suggested that the nonparenchymal cells possibly play a role in these areas . The present study presents evidence that at least one of the microsomal NADPH-requirig enzymes, benzpyrene hydroxylase, is present in nonparenchymal cells and, furthermore, is "inducible ." In adult rats treated with 3-methylcholanthrene or ß-naphthoflavone, the nonparenchymal cells exhibited increases in benzpyrene hydroxylase activity of 17-fold and five-fold, respectively . Treatment with phenobarbital resulted in only a slight increase in enzyme activity . Enzyme activity in parenchymal cells under similar conditions was increased sixfold and fivefold by 3-methylcholanthrene and ß-naphthoflavone, respectively, but not by phenobarbital.
    • Cell Membrane Disruption Stimulates NO/PKG Signaling and Potentiates Cell Membrane Repair in Neighboring Cells

      Togo, Tatsuru; McNeil, Paul L.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (2012-08-7)
      Resealing of a disrupted plasma membrane at the micron-diameter range requires Ca2+-regulated exocytosis. Repeated membrane disruptions reseal more quickly than the initial wound, and this potentiation of membrane resealing persists for at least 24 hours after the initial wound. Long-term potentiation of membrane resealing requires CREB-dependent gene expression, which is activated by the PKC- and p38 MAPK-dependent pathway in a wounded cell. The present study demonstrates that membrane resealing is potentiated in both wounded and neighboring cells in MDCK cells. Wounding of cells expressing CREB133, a mutant variant of CREB, does not show the potentiated response of cell membrane resealing in either wounded or neighboring cells. Furthermore, wounding of cells induces CREB phosphorylation, not only in wounded cells, but also in neighboring cells. Inhibition of the nitric oxide/PKG signaling pathway suppresses CREB phosphorylation in neighboring cells, but not in wounded cells. The potentiation of membrane resealing in neighboring cells is suppressed if the nitric oxide/PKG pathway is inhibited during the initial wound. Together, these results suggest that the nitric oxide/PKG pathway stimulates CREB phosphorylation in neighboring cells so that subsequent cell membrane disruptions of the neighboring cells reseal more quickly.
    • A Cost-Effective Transparency-Based Digital Imaging for Efficient and Accurate Wound Area Measurement

      Li, Pei-Nan; Li, Hong; Wu, Mo-Li; Wang, Shou-Yu; Kong, Qing-You; Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Jia; Lv, De-Cheng; McNeil, Paul L.; et al. (2012-05-30)
      Wound measurement is an objective and direct way to trace the course of wound healing and to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. Nevertheless, the accuracy and efficiency of the current measurement methods need to be improved. Taking the advantages of reliability of transparency tracing and the accuracy of computer-aided digital imaging, a transparency-based digital imaging approach is established, by which data from 340 wound tracing were collected from 6 experimental groups (8 rats/group) at 8 experimental time points (Day 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14 and 16) and orderly archived onto a transparency model sheet. This sheet was scanned and its image was saved in JPG form. Since a set of standard area units from 1 mm2 to 1 cm2 was integrated into the sheet, the tracing areas in JPG image were measured directly, using the â Magnetic lasso toolâ in Adobe Photoshop program. The pixel values/PVs of individual outlined regions were obtained and recorded in an average speed of 27 second/region. All PV data were saved in an excel form and their corresponding areas were calculated simultaneously by the formula of Y (PV of the outlined region)/X (PV of standard area unit) Ã Z (area of standard unit). It took a researcher less than 3 hours to finish area calculation of 340 regions. In contrast, over 3 hours were expended by three skillful researchers to accomplish the above work with traditional transparency-based method. Moreover, unlike the results obtained traditionally, little variation was found among the data calculated by different persons and the standard area units in different sizes and shapes. Given its accurate, reproductive and efficient properties, this transparency-based digital imaging approach would be of significant values in basic wound healing research and clinical practice.
    • Curtailing side effects in chemotherapy: a tale of PKCδ in cisplatin treatment

      Pabla, Navjotsingh; Dong, Zheng; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (2012-01-31)
      The efficacy of chemotherapy is often limited by side effects in normal tissues. This is exemplified by cisplatin, a widely used anti-cancer drug that may induce serious toxicity in normal tissues and organs including the kidneys. Decades of research have delineated multiple signaling pathways that lead to kidney cell injury and death during cisplatin treatment. However, the same signaling pathways may also be activated in cancer cells and be responsible for the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin in tumors and, as a result, blockade of these pathways is expected to reduce the side effects as well as the anti-cancer efficacy. Thus, to effectively curtail the side effects, it is imperative to elucidate and target the cell killing mechanisms that are specific to normal (and not cancer) tissues. Our recent work identified protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) as a new and critical mediator of cisplatin-induced kidney cell injury and death. Importantly, inhibition of PKCδ enhanced the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin in several tumor models while alleviating the side effect in kidneys, opening a new avenue for normal tissue protection during chemotherapy.
    • The effect of murine cytomegalovirus IE-3 specific shRNA is dependent on intragenic target site due to multiple transcription initiation sites

      Marshall, Brendan; Zhang, Ming; Atherton, Sally S; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (2011-09-18)
      Background: Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) is closely related to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) which is responsible for a variety of diseases, including retinitis, in immunocompromised individuals. Small inhibitory RNA molecules directed against essential viral regulatory genes may prove clinically useful.
    • The Effects of Mechanical Stress on the Growth, Differentiation, and Paracrine Factor Production of Cardiac Stem Cells

      Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Kubo, Masayuki; Ohshima, Mako; Yamamoto, Yumi; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Ryo; Ikenaga, Shigeru; Mikamo, Akihito; Udo, Koichi; Hamano, Kimikazu; et al. (2011-12-28)
      Stem cell therapies have been clinically employed to repair the injured heart, and cardiac stem cells are thought to be one of the most potent stem cell candidates. The beating heart is characterized by dynamic mechanical stresses, which may have a significant impact on stem cell therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate how mechanical stress affects the growth and differentiation of cardiac stem cells and their release of paracrine factors. In this study, human cardiac stem cells were seeded in a silicon chamber and mechanical stress was then induced by cyclic stretch stimulation (60 cycles/min with 120% elongation). Cells grown in non-stretched silicon chambers were used as controls. Our result revealed that mechanical stretching significantly reduced the total number of surviving cells, decreased Ki-67-positive cells, and increased TUNEL-positive cells in the stretched group 24 hrs after stretching, as compared to the control group. Interestingly, mechanical stretching significantly increased the release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β as well as the angiogenic growth factors VEGF and bFGF from the cells in 12 hrs. Furthermore, mechanical stretching significantly reduced the percentage of c-kit-positive stem cells, but increased the expressions of cardiac troponin-I and smooth muscle actin in cells 3 days after stretching. Using a traditional stretching model, we demonstrated that mechanical stress suppressed the growth and proliferation of cardiac stem cells, enhanced their release of inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors, and improved their myogenic differentiation. The development of this in vitro approach may help elucidate the complex mechanisms of stem cell therapy for heart failure.
    • Ex Vivo Stretch Reveals Altered Mechanical Properties of Isolated Dystrophin-Deficient Hearts

      Barnabei, Matthew S.; Metzger, Joseph M.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (2012-03-9)
      Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal disease of muscle wasting caused by loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. In the heart, DMD results in progressive cardiomyopathy and dilation of the left ventricle through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Previous reports have shown that loss of dystrophin causes sarcolemmal instability and reduced mechanical compliance of isolated cardiac myocytes. To expand upon these findings, here we have subjected the left ventricles of dystrophin-deficient mdx hearts to mechanical stretch. Unexpectedly, isolated mdx hearts showed increased left ventricular (LV) compliance compared to controls during stretch as LV volume was increased above normal end diastolic volume. During LV chamber distention, sarcomere lengths increased similarly in mdx and WT hearts despite greater excursions in volume of mdx hearts. This suggests that the mechanical properties of the intact heart cannot be modeled as a simple extrapolation of findings in single cardiac myocytes. To explain these findings, a model is proposed in which disruption of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex perturbs cell-extracellular matrix contacts and promotes the apparent slippage of myocytes past each other during LV distension. In comparison, similar increases in LV compliance were obtained in isolated hearts from b-sarcoglycan-null and laminin-a2 mutant mice, but not in dysferlin-null mice, suggesting that increased whole-organ compliance in mdx mice is a specific effect of disrupted cell-extracellular matrix contacts and not a general consequence of cardiomyopathy via membrane defect processes. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel and cell-death independent mechanism for the progressive pathological LV dilation that occurs in DMD.
    • Genetic Ablation of CD68 Results in Mice with Increased Bone and Dysfunctional Osteoclasts

      Ashley, Jason W.; Shi, Zhenqi; Zhao, Haibo; Li, Xingsheng; Kesterson, Robert A.; Feng, Xu; McNeil, Paul L.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy; College of Graduate Studies (2011-10-3)
      CD68 is a member of the lysosome associated membrane protein (LAMP) family that is restricted in its expression to cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. This lineage restriction includes osteoclasts, and, while previous studies of CD68 in macrophages and dendritic cells have proposed roles in lipid metabolism, phagocytosis, and antigen presentation, the expression and function of CD68 in osteoclasts have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the expression and localization of CD68 in macrophages and osteoclasts in response to the monocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). We found that M-CSF stimulates CD68 expression and RANKL alters the apparent molecular weight of CD68 as measured by Western immunoblotting. In addition, we explored the significance of CD68 expression in osteoclasts by generating mice that lack expression of CD68. These mice have increased trabecular bone, and in vitro assessment of CD68â /â osteoclasts revealed that, in the absence of CD68, osteoclasts demonstrate an accumulation of intracellular vesicle-like structures, and do not efficiently resorb bone. These findings demonstrate a role for CD68 in the function of osteoclasts, and future studies will determine the mechanistic nature of the defects seen in CD68â /â osteoclasts.
    • Human Platelet-Rich Plasma- and Extracellular Matrix-Derived Peptides Promote Impaired Cutaneous Wound Healing In Vivo

      Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Wolf, Lindsey; Deckenback, Jeffry; Hamblin, Michael R.; Herman, Ira M.; McNeil, Paul L.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy; College of Graduate Studies (2012-02-23)
      Previous work in our laboratory has described several pro-angiogenic short peptides derived from endothelial extracellular matrices degraded by bacterial collagenase. Here we tested whether these peptides could stimulate wound healing in vivo. Our experiments demonstrated that a peptide created as combination of fragments of tenascin X and fibrillin 1 (comb1) applied into cranial dermal wounds created in mice treated with cyclophosphamide to impair wound healing, can improve the rate of wound closure. Furthermore, we identify and characterize a novel peptide (UN3) created and modified from two naturally-occurring peptides, which are present in human platelet-rich plasma. In vitro testing of UN3 demonstrates that it causes a 50% increase in endothelial proliferation, 250% increase in angiogenic response and a tripling of epithelial cell migration in response to injury.
    • In vivo MRI Characterization of Progressive Cardiac Dysfunction in the mdx Mouse Model of Muscular Dystrophy

      Stuckey, Daniel J.; Carr, Carolyn A.; Camelliti, Patrizia; Tyler, Damian J.; Davies, Kay E.; Clarke, Kieran; McNeil, Paul L.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy; College of Graduate Studies (2012-01-3)
      Aims: The mdx mouse has proven to be useful in understanding the cardiomyopathy that frequently occurs in muscular dystrophy patients. Here we employed a comprehensive array of clinically relevant in vivo MRI techniques to identify early markers of cardiac dysfunction and follow disease progression in the hearts of mdx mice.
    • Insulin-like growth factor 1 attenuates antiestrogen- and antiprogestin-induced apoptosis in ER+ breast cancer cells by MEK1 regulation of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein Bim

      Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Takhar, Suchreet; Singer, Adam; Dohn, Michael Robert; Jackson, William Hutch; Welborn, April Eve; LeRoith, Derek; Marrero, Mario; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Huang, Shuang; et al. (2012-03-19)
      Introduction: In this pre-clinical in vitro study conducted in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells, we have characterized the effects of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) on the cytostatic and cytotoxic action of antiestrogen treatment when used as a single agent or in combination with the antiprogestin mifepristone (MIF). Our goal was to identify new molecular targets to improve the efficacy of hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients that have a poor response to hormonal therapy, in part, due to high circulating levels of unbound insulinIGF-1.
    • Intercellular Communication by Exchange of Cytoplasmic Material via Tunneling Nano-Tube Like Structures in Primary Human Renal Epithelial Cells

      Domhan, Sophie; Ma, Lili; Tai, Albert; Anaya, Zachary; Beheshti, Afshin; Zeier, Martin; Hlatky, Lynn; Abdollahi, Amir; McNeil, Paul L.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy; et al. (2011-06-27)
      Transfer of cellular material via tunneling nanotubes (TNT) was recently discovered as a novel mechanism for intercellular communication. The role of intercellular exchange in communication of renal epithelium is not known. Here we report extensive spontaneous intercellular exchange of cargo vesicles and organelles between primary human proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC). Cells were labeled with two different quantum dot nanocrystals (Qtracker 605 or 525) and intercellular exchange was quantified by high-throughput fluorescence imaging and FACS analysis. In co-culture, a substantial fraction of cells (67.5%) contained both dyes indicating high levels of spontaneous intercellular exchange in RPTEC. The double positive cells could be divided into three categories based on the preponderance of 605 Qtracker (46.30%), 525 Qtracker (48.3%) and approximately equal content of both Qtrackers (4.57%). The transfer of mitochondria between RPTECs was also detected using an organelle specific dye. Inhibition of TNT genesis by actin polymerization inhibitor (Latrunculin B) markedly reduced intercellular exchange (>60%) suggesting that intercellular exchange in RPTEC was in part mediated via TNT-like structures. In contrast, induction of cellular stress by Zeocin treatment increased tube-genesis in RPTEC. Our data indicates an unexpected dynamic of intercellular communication between RPTEC by exchange of cytosolic material, which may play an important role in renal physiology.
    • Label-Free 3D Visualization of Cellular and Tissue Structures in Intact Muscle with Second and Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

      Rehberg, Markus; Krombach, Fritz; Pohl, Ulrich; Dietzel, Steffen; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy; College of Graduate Studies (2011-11-28)
      Second and Third Harmonic Generation (SHG and THG) microscopy is based on optical effects which are induced by specific inherent physical properties of a specimen. As a multi-photon laser scanning approach which is not based on fluorescence it combines the advantages of a label-free technique with restriction of signal generation to the focal plane, thus allowing high resolution 3D reconstruction of image volumes without out-of-focus background several hundred micrometers deep into the tissue. While in mammalian soft tissues SHG is mostly restricted to collagen fibers and striated muscle myosin, THG is induced at a large variety of structures, since it is generated at interfaces such as refraction index changes within the focal volume of the excitation laser. Besides, colorants such as hemoglobin can cause resonance enhancement, leading to intense THG signals. We applied SHG and THG microscopy to murine (Mus musculus) muscles, an established model system for physiological research, to investigate their potential for label-free tissue imaging. In addition to collagen fibers and muscle fiber substructure, THG allowed us to visualize blood vessel walls and erythrocytes as well as white blood cells adhering to vessel walls, residing in or moving through the extravascular tissue. Moreover peripheral nerve fibers could be clearly identified. Structure down to the nuclear chromatin distribution was visualized in 3D and with more detail than obtainable by bright field microscopy. To our knowledge, most of these objects have not been visualized previously by THG or any label-free 3D approach. THG allows label-free microscopy with inherent optical sectioning and therefore may offer similar improvements compared to bright field microscopy as does confocal laser scanning microscopy compared to conventional fluorescence microscopy.
    • Lack of Correlation between Outcomes of Membrane Repair Assay and Correction of Dystrophic Changes in Experimental Therapeutic Strategy in Dysferlinopathy

      Lostal, William; Bartoli, Marc; Roudaut, Carinne; Bourg, Nathalie; Krahn, Martin; Pryadkina, Marina; Borel, Perrine; Suel, Laurence; Roche, Joseph A.; Stockholm, Daniel; et al. (2012-05-29)
      Mutations in the dysferlin gene are the cause of Limb-girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2B and Miyoshi Myopathy. The dysferlin protein has been implicated in sarcolemmal resealing, leading to the idea that the pathophysiology of dysferlin deficiencies is due to a deficit in membrane repair. Here, we show using two different approaches that fullfiling membrane repair as asseyed by laser wounding assay is not sufficient for alleviating the dysferlin deficient pathology. First, we generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing myoferlin to test the hypothesis that myoferlin, which is homologous to dysferlin, can compensate for the absence of dysferlin. The myoferlin overexpressors show no skeletal muscle abnormalities, and crossing them with a dysferlin-deficient model rescues the membrane fusion defect present in dysferlin-deficient mice in vitro. However, myoferlin overexpression does not correct muscle histology in vivo. Second, we report that AAV-mediated transfer of a minidysferlin, previously shown to correct the membrane repair deficit in vitro, also fails to improve muscle histology. Furthermore, neither myoferlin nor the minidysferlin prevented myofiber degeneration following eccentric exercise. Our data suggest that the pathogenicity of dysferlin deficiency is not solely related to impairment in sarcolemmal repair and highlight the care needed in selecting assays to assess potential therapies for dysferlinopathies.
    • Loss, Restoration, and Maintenance of Plasma Membrane Integrity

      McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (1997-04-7)
    • Male accessory gland protein reduces egg laying in a simultaneous hermaphrodite.

      Koene, Joris M; Sloot, Wiebe; Montagne-Wajer, Kora; Cummins, Scott F; Degnan, Bernard M; Smith, John S; Nagle, Gregg T; ter Maat, Andries; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (2010-04-20)
      Seminal fluid is an important part of the ejaculate of internally fertilizing animals. This fluid contains substances that nourish and activate sperm for successful fertilization. Additionally, it contains components that influence female physiology to further enhance fertilization success of the sperm donor, possibly beyond the recipient's optimum. Although evidence for such substances abounds, few studies have unraveled their identities, and focus has been exclusively on separate-sex species. We present the first detailed study into the seminal fluid composition of a hermaphrodite (Lymnaea stagnalis). Eight novel peptides and proteins were identified from the seminal-fluid-producing prostate gland and tested for effects on oviposition, hatching and consumption. The gene for the protein found to suppress egg mass production, Ovipostatin, was sequenced, thereby providing the first fully-characterized seminal fluid substance in a simultaneous hermaphrodite. Thus, seminal fluid peptides and proteins have evolved and can play a crucial role in sexual selection even when the sexes are combined.
    • Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Adipogenic Reduction by Prohibitin Silencing in 3T3-L1 Cells

      Liu, Dong; Lin, Yiming; Kang, Ting; Huang, Bo; Xu, Wei; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva; Olatinwo, Moshood; Matthews, Roland; Chen, Yuqing Eugene; Thompson, Winston E.; et al. (2012-03-30)
      Increase in mitochondrial biogenesis has been shown to accompany brown and white adipose cell differentiation. Prohibitins (PHBs), comprised of two evolutionarily conserved proteins, prohibitin-1 (PHB1) and prohibitin-2 (PHB2), are present in a high molecular-weight complex in the inner membrane of mitochondria. However, little is known about the effect of mitochondrial PHBs in adipogenesis. In the present study, we demonstrate that the levels of both PHB1 and PHB2 are significantly increased during adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, especially in mitochondria. Knockdown of PHB1 or PHB2 by oligonucleotide siRNA significantly reduced the expression of adipogenic markers, the accumulation of lipids and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. In addition, fragmentation of mitochondrial reticulum, loss of mitochondrial cristae, reduction of mitochondrial content, impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity and excessive production of ROS were observed upon PHB-silencing in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that PHBs are critical mediators in promoting 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and may be the potential targets for obesity therapies.
    • Modulation of Syndecan-1 Shedding after Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation

      Haywood-Watson, Ricky J.; Holcomb, John B.; Gonzalez, Ernest A.; Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Park, Pyong Woo; Wang, WeiWei; Zaske, Ana Maria; Menge, Tyler; Kozar, Rosemary A.; et al. (2011-08-19)
      The early use of fresh frozen plasma as a resuscitative agent after hemorrhagic shock has been associated with improved survival, but the mechanism of protection is unknown. Hemorrhagic shock causes endothelial cell dysfunction and we hypothesized that fresh frozen plasma would restore endothelial integrity and reduce syndecan-1 shedding after hemorrhagic shock. A prospective, observational study in severely injured patients in hemorrhagic shock demonstrated significantly elevated levels of syndecan-1 (554±93 ng/ml) after injury, which decreased with resuscitation (187±36 ng/ml) but was elevated compared to normal donors (27±1 ng/ml). Three pro-inflammatory cytokines, interferon-γ, fractalkine, and interleukin-1β, negatively correlated while one anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, positively correlated with shed syndecan-1. These cytokines all play an important role in maintaining endothelial integrity. An in vitro model of endothelial injury then specifically examined endothelial permeability after treatment with fresh frozen plasma orlactated Ringers. Shock or endothelial injury disrupted junctional integrity and increased permeability, which was improved with fresh frozen plasma, but not lactated Ringers. Changes in endothelial cell permeability correlated with syndecan-1 shedding. These data suggest that plasma based resuscitation preserved endothelial syndecan-1 and maintained endothelial integrity, and may help to explain the protective effects of fresh frozen plasma after hemorrhagic shock.
    • Multicolor Time-lapse Imaging of Transgenic Zebrafish: Visualizing Retinal Stem Cells Activated by Targeted Neuronal Cell Ablation

      Ariga, Junko; Walker, Steven L.; Mumm, Jeff S.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (2010-09-20)
      High-resolution time-lapse imaging of living zebrafish larvae can be utilized to visualize how biological processes unfold (for review see 1). Compound transgenic fish which express different fluorescent reporters in neighboring cell types provide a means of following cellular interactions 2 and/or tissue-level responses to experimental manipulations over time. In this video, we demonstrate methods that can be used for imaging multiple transgenically labeled cell types serially in individual fish over time courses that can span from minutes to several days. The techniques described are applicable to any study seeking to correlate the "behavior" of neighboring cells types over time, including: 1) serial 'catch and release' methods for imaging a large number of fish over successive days, 2) simplified approaches for separating fluorophores with overlapping excitation/emission profiles (e.g., GFP and YFP), 3) use of hypopigmented mutant lines to extend the time window available for high-resolution imaging into late larval stages of development, 4) use of membrane targeted fluorescent reporters to reveal fine morphological detail of individual cells as well as cellular details in larger populations of cells, and 5) a previously described method for chemically-induced ablation of transgenically targeted cell types; i.e., nitroreductase (NTR) mediated conversion of prodrug substrates, such as metronidazole (MTZ), to cytotoxic derivatives 3,5.
    • Myostatin Is Elevated in Congenital Heart Disease and After Mechanical Unloading

      Bish, Lawrence T.; George, Isaac; Maybaum, Simon; Yang, Jonathan; Chen, Jonathan M.; Sweeney, H. Lee; McNeil, Paul L.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy; College of Graduate Studies (2011-09-13)
      Background: Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass whose activity is upregulated in adult heart failure (HF); however, its role in congenital heart disease (CHD) is unknown.