• Intraoperative neurocytology of primary central nervous system neoplasia: A simplified and practical diagnostic approach

      Sharma, Suash; Deb, Prabal; Department of Pathology (2011)
      Intraoperative consultations may pose considerable diagnostic challenge to the neuropathologist in diagnosing primary and metastatic neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS). Cytological preparations in the form of squash, touch, imprint or smears are few of the available modalities in addition to the frozen section (FS). Although the latter is superior in providing both histologic patterns and cytomorphologic details yet smears are of vital importance when tissue available is limited (stereotactic biopsy), scrutinisation of intercellular matrix (astrocytoma versus oligodendroglioma) and evaluation of discohesive cells (lymphoma, pituitary adenoma) and in inflammatory lesions. This review is intended to emphasize the value, applicability and limitations of neurocytology aiming to expedite the intraoperative smear-based diagnoses of CNS neoplasia as per the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. We recommend that whenever possible, both smears and FS should be examined concomitantly and in a correlative manner. In the unlikely event of a mismatch between the findings on smear and FS, intraoperative diagnosis is primarily based on FS, if adequate tissue is available. However, each case must be evaluated on its own merit and in difficult cases relevant differential diagnoses should be offered to facilitate surgical decisions and optimally triage patient management.
    • Pediatric primary intramedullary spinal cord glioblastoma

      Lober, Robert M.; Sharma, Suash; Bell, Beverly; Free, Alan; Figueroa, Ramon; Sheils, Chris W; Lee, Mark R.; Cowell, John K.; Department of Pathology; Department of Pediatrics; et al. (2010-09-30)
      Spinal cord tumors in pediatric patients are rare, representing less than 1% of all central nervous system tumors. Two cases of pediatric primary intramedullary spinal cord glioblastoma at ages 14 and 8 years are reported. Both patients presented with rapid onset paraparesis and quadraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging in both showed heterogeneously enhancing solitary mass lesions localized to lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord parenchyma. Histopathologic diagnosis was glioblastoma. Case #1 had a small cell component (primitive neuroectodermal tumor-like areas), higher Ki67, and p53 labeling indices, and a relatively stable karyotype with only minimal single copy losses involving regions: Chr8;pter-30480019, Chr16;pter-29754532, Chr16;56160245â 88668979, and Chr19;32848902-qter on retrospective comparative genomic hybridization using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. Case #2 had relatively bland histomorphology and negligible p53 immunoreactivity. Both underwent multimodal therapy including gross total resection, postoperative radiation and chemotherapy. However, there was no significant improvement in neurological deficits, and overall survival in both cases was 14 months.This report highlights the broad histological spectrum and poor overall survival despite multi modality therapy. The finding of relatively unique genotypic abnormalities resembling pediatric embryonal tumors in one case may highlight the value of genome-wide profiling in development of effective therapy. The differences in management with intracranial and low-grade spinal cord gliomas and current management issues are discussed.