• Anomalous coronary artery found in the syncopal workup of an elderly man

      Oommen, Ronnie; Wilkins, Thad; Chen, Stephen Y; Arora, Vishal; Department of Family Medicine; Department of Medicine; Department of Cardiology (2012-07)
      Syncope, defined as a transient loss of consciousness, is seen in 1% of all visits to emergency departments and urgent care clinics in the United States. Syncope is categorized as cardiogenic, neurologic, or psychogenic. Anomalies of the coronary arteries are rare, and anomalous coronary arteries present as syncope more often in the young than in the elderly; syncope rarely occurs in patients 65 years of age and older. There are 2 major variants of coronary anomalies. In the first variant, the left main coronary artery arises from the right aortic sinus. In the second variant, the right coronary artery arises from the left aortic sinus. The risk of sudden death is higher in patients with the left coronary artery arising from the right aortic sinus. We present a case of an anomalous coronary artery discovered during the syncopal workup in a 66-year-old man because no such cases have been published in the United States. We will discuss the management of anomalous coronary arteries as well as a systematic approach to the diagnosis and management of syncope.
    • Diagnosis and management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

      Wilkins, Thad; Khan, Naiman; Nabh, Akash; Schade, Robert R.; Department of Family Medicine; Department of Medicine (2012-03-01)
      Upper gastrointestinal bleeding causes significant morbidity and mortality in the United States, and has been associated with increasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Rapid assessment and resuscitation should precede the diagnostic evaluation in unstable patients with severe bleeding. Risk stratification is based on clinical assessment and endoscopic findings. Early upper endoscopy (within 24 hours of presentation) is recommended in most patients because it confirms the diagnosis and allows for targeted endoscopic treatment, including epinephrine injection, thermocoagulation, application of clips, and banding. Endoscopic therapy results in reduced morbidity, hospital stays, risk of recurrent bleeding, and need for surgery. Although administration of proton pump inhibitors does not decrease mortality, risk of rebleeding, or need for surgery, it reduces stigmata of recent hemorrhage and the need for endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic therapy, rebleeding can occur in 10 to 20 percent of patients; a second attempt at endoscopic therapy is recommended in these patients. Arteriography with embolization or surgery may be needed if there is persistent and severe bleeding.
    • Salmonella newport bacteremia in a 12-day-old infant.

      Singh, Abhijit; Wilkins, Thad; Schade, Robert R.; Department of Family Medicine (2011-03)
      In the United States, Salmonella infections (salmonellosis) cause multiple medical problems. Although the most common presenting symptom is diarrhea, bacteremia can also occur. An estimated 1.4 million cases of salmonellosis occur annually in the United States. We present a case of Salmonella bacteremia in a 12-day old infant. We discuss the presenting signs, symptoms, and management strategies for a patient younger than 28 days old (neonate) presenting with fever and diarrhea.