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dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Lubna
dc.contributor.authorde Fockert, Jan W.
dc.contributor.editorTsien, Joe Z.
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T20:35:11Z
dc.date.available2012-10-26T20:35:11Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-28en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2012 Aug 28; 7(8):e43101en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22952636en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0043101en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/822
dc.description.abstractBackground: Working memory (WM) is imperative for effective selective attention. Distractibility is greater under conditions of high (vs. low) concurrent working memory load (WML), and in individuals with low (vs. high) working memory capacity (WMC). In the current experiments, we recorded the flanker task performance of individuals with high and low WMC during low and high WML, to investigate the combined effect of WML and WMC on selective attention.
dc.description.abstractMethodology/Principal Findings: In
dc.description.abstractConclusions/Significance: The current findings show that limitations in WM resources, due to either WML or individual differences in WMC, affect the spatial distribution of attention. The difference in attentional constraining between high and low WMC individuals demonstrated in the current experiments helps characterise the nature of previously established associations between WMC and controlled attention.
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectWorking Memoryen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectMental Healthen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.subjectAttention (Behavior)en_US
dc.subjectCognitive Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectExperimental Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial and Behavioral Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.subjectAttention (Behavior)en_US
dc.subjectCognitive Psychologyen_US
dc.titleFocusing on Attention: The Effects of Working Memory Capacity and Load on Selective Attentionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3429456en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Neurology
dc.contributor.corporatenameCollege of Graduate Studies
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T00:57:46Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Working memory (WM) is imperative for effective selective attention. Distractibility is greater under conditions of high (vs. low) concurrent working memory load (WML), and in individuals with low (vs. high) working memory capacity (WMC). In the current experiments, we recorded the flanker task performance of individuals with high and low WMC during low and high WML, to investigate the combined effect of WML and WMC on selective attention.
html.description.abstractMethodology/Principal Findings: In
html.description.abstractConclusions/Significance: The current findings show that limitations in WM resources, due to either WML or individual differences in WMC, affect the spatial distribution of attention. The difference in attentional constraining between high and low WMC individuals demonstrated in the current experiments helps characterise the nature of previously established associations between WMC and controlled attention.


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