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dc.contributor.authorHegéd, Jay
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Serena K.
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Mark
dc.contributor.authorKersten, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T20:30:46Z
dc.date.available2012-10-26T20:30:46Z
dc.date.issued2012-06-19en_US
dc.identifier.citationFront Hum Neurosci. 2012 Jun 19; 6:170en_US
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22723774en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2012.00170en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/800
dc.description.abstractTheoretical studies suggest that the visual system uses prior knowledge of visual objects to recognize them in visual clutter, and posit that the strategies for recognizing objects in clutter may differ depending on whether or not the object was learned in clutter to begin with. We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of human subjects. We trained subjects to recognize naturalistic, yet novel objects in strong or weak clutter. We then tested subjects' recognition performance for both sets of objects in strong clutter. We found many brain regions that were differentially responsive to objects during object recognition depending on whether they were learned in strong or weak clutter. In particular, the responses of the left fusiform gyrus (FG) reliably reflected, on a trial-to-trial basis, subjects' object recognition performance for objects learned in the presence of strong clutter. These results indicate that the visual system does not use a single, general-purpose mechanism to cope with clutter. Instead, there are two distinct spatial patterns of activation whose responses are attributable not to the visual context in which the objects were seen, but to the context in which the objects were learned.
dc.rightsCopyright © 2012 Hegdé, Thompson, Brady and Kersten.en_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectOriginal Research Articleen_US
dc.titleObject recognition in clutter: cortical responses depend on the type of learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3378082en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Ophthalmology
dc.contributor.corporatenameVision Discovery Institute
dc.contributor.corporatenameBrain & Behavior Discovery Institute
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T00:55:27Z
html.description.abstractTheoretical studies suggest that the visual system uses prior knowledge of visual objects to recognize them in visual clutter, and posit that the strategies for recognizing objects in clutter may differ depending on whether or not the object was learned in clutter to begin with. We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of human subjects. We trained subjects to recognize naturalistic, yet novel objects in strong or weak clutter. We then tested subjects' recognition performance for both sets of objects in strong clutter. We found many brain regions that were differentially responsive to objects during object recognition depending on whether they were learned in strong or weak clutter. In particular, the responses of the left fusiform gyrus (FG) reliably reflected, on a trial-to-trial basis, subjects' object recognition performance for objects learned in the presence of strong clutter. These results indicate that the visual system does not use a single, general-purpose mechanism to cope with clutter. Instead, there are two distinct spatial patterns of activation whose responses are attributable not to the visual context in which the objects were seen, but to the context in which the objects were learned.


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