• Psychosocial Factors as Predictors for Patient Outcomes in Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Injury Caused by Trauma:

      Holley, Ashlyn; Saren, Madison; Wygle, Sarah; Deese, Abigail; Payne, Regan; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-26)
      At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will be able to: 1) Explain three ways in which psychosocial factors have the ability to alter rehabilitation outcomes in individuals who have sustained a traumatic upper extremity injury, 2) Discuss two gaps in the literature regarding the impact of psychosocial factors on rehabilitation outcomes in individuals recovering from traumatic upper extremity injuries, 3) Identify two methods, strategies, or assessments to be implemented in practice in order to evaluate and address psychosocial factors as a component affecting functional outcomes of clients with traumatic UE injuries.
    • Pulmonary Stress in the Alcoholic and Obese Lung

      Thomas, Amanda Blair; Department Of Undergraduate Health Professions (Augusta University, 2015-05)
      In the United States today, alcoholism and obesity are increasingly becoming issues for a vast age group from young children to geriatric adults. Alcoholism and obesity have been extensively studied as separate entities that have been proven to change metabolism and cause over-lapping health issues, which prompted us to study them in conjunction with one another, especially in the lungs. One major link between these two alarmingly common problems is Krüppel-Like Factor 4 (KLF4), a cell regulatory protein crucial to cellular normality and monocyte differentiation. This particular study highlights the effects alcoholism and obesity have on the lung, specifically epithelial cells (L2) and macrophages (AM). The goal of this project is to measure the KLF4 expression in the L2 and AM cells subjected to high ethanol (EtOH) consumption, high glucose consumption, high EtOH and glucose consumption, as well as a healthy control lung in to explain the mechanism behind decreased immune function in these patients.
    • Rehabilitation of a 38 year old male following an Arthroscopic Repair of a Type II Superior Labral Anterior Posterior (SLAP) Lesion

      Gonsalves, Vincent; Keskula, Douglas R; Department of Physical Therapy (Shenandoah University, 2013-06-25)
      Postoperative rehabilitation following arthroscopic repair of the Type II superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) biceps lesions presents a challenge to the physical therapist due to limited evidence-based reviews available within the literature. This case report describes the postoperative rehabilitation of an arthroscopic Type II SLAP repair utilizing suture anchors. The interventions and the postoperative precautions are outlined and related to the emerging evidence. The patient described was a 38 year old male electrician who sustained a work-related SLAP lesion and was referred to physical therapy for postoperative rehabilitation. Following participation in a supervised structured plan of care, the patient developed adequate strength and range of motion required for job functions and ADLs. He achieved a score of 95% on the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) functional test. Patient goals were met and he was released to full duty without restrictions at 5 months post-surgery.
    • Telehealth Interventions to Address Chronic Disease Self-Management Interventions within the Scope of Occupational Therapy: A Scoping Review

      Albritton, Liz; Fish, joJo; Henkel, Jeff; Lee, Shelby; Luttrel, Rachel; Rackleff, Layne; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-09-02)
      At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: 1) Distinguish between the types of telehealth interventions for chronic disease self-management within the scope of occupational therapy and 2) Describe the outcomes of using telehealth for chronic disease self-management based on the presented results of a scoping review of the literature.
    • Witchcraft and Physical Therapy Management: Application of the Inquiry-Based Model to Physical Therapy Education

      Keskula, Douglas R; Wark, ET; Department of Physical Therapy; Department of Physical Therapy (Georgia Health Sciences University, 2013-01-08)
      The purpose of this case report is to describe the inquiry-based model of instruction and its use in an entry-level physical therapy educational setting. Educators facilitate the acquisition of critical thinking skills through their choice and application of various instructional strategies and methodologies. The inquiry model is designed to help students problem solve by facilitating the acquisition of both analytical and process skills. Practice and mastery of these skills are beneficial to students in the health professions, as they will need to transfer these abilities to the complex clinical setting. This is particularly true of physical therapists, who practice in an increasingly autonomous manner. The use of the inquiry model as an instructional method complements a learner centered environment. The learning activity described below is used as a bridge to the examination, evaluation and diagnostic process the physical therapy students will need to master in subsequent didactic and clinical educational experiences. The selection of the problem used in the inquiry process is a key consideration to the success of the activity. The problem chosen must be interesting, intriguing and hold the attention of the students. A general problem such as the witchcraft example discussed in this paper is suitable for most disciplines, as specific clinical skills or content knowledge is not necessary for students to participate and be successful in this activity. The key element of the inquiry method is the debriefing session that concludes the activity. In the debriefing, faculty lead a guided discussion regarding the processes used by the learners to reach a viable solution to the problem. Areas examined include why certain hypotheses were formed, what information was sought and utilized by the learners to try to prove or disprove the hypotheses, and how the learners classified or grouped information together. The debriefing discussion highlights not the outcome of the problem but rather the critical reasoning process utilized by the learners to reach a conclusion, which is the primary goal of this learning activity. Students consistently respond favorably to this activity as evidenced by their active participation and positive course feedback. The faculty and students of the entry-level physical therapy program have found this activity to be a very pertinent precursor to the critical reasoning required for the clinical diagnostic process. Practical guidelines for the organization and implementation of the inquiry model as a type of instructional strategy are presented.