• Managing clinical knowledge for health care improvement

      Balas, E. Andrew; Boren, Suzanne A.; Office of the Dean of the College of Allied Health Sciences (2000)
      The authors assess the growth in clinical research studies coupled with a slow rate of adoption, often taking an average of 17 years for new evidence-based findings to reach clinical practice. Some issues discussed include the need for a more efficient information infrastructure to better connect front-line professionals with the research community, difficulties in translating research into practice, and an inadequate system to help health care clinicians evaluate the strength of new study findings.
    • Manual Physical Therapy for a Patient Following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA)

      Petosky, Teressa; Keskula, Douglas R; Akinwuntan, Abiodun; Wilson, Diane; Department of Physical Therapy (Georgia Regents University, 2013-06-07)
      A 66-year-old woman was referred to outpatient physical therapy 3 weeks following primary unilateral TKA for severe osteoarthritis. Upon initial examination, the patient had significant post-operative pain, impaired gait, and decreased range of motion (ROM),strength, and functional mobility. Additionally, the patient presented with adherent scar tissue along the length of her surgical incision and diffuse soft tissue restrictions in the quadriceps and tensor fascia latae. Treatment consisted of all the components of conventional physical therapy in addition to manual physical therapy. Components of traditional physical therapy included strengthening exercises, aerobic exercises, stretching, and training in performance of everyday activities, such as navigating stairs. Manual therapy techniques included joint mobilization, scar tissue massage, soft tissue mobilization, and therapist-assisted manual stretching. Active knee flexion ROM, the Timed Up and Go (TUG), the 6 Minute Walk Test (6MW), and the 36-Item Short Form Health Questionnaire (SF-36) were completed at initial examination and again 5 weeks later at discharge.
    • Micronutrient and Macronutrient Composition of Breastmilk from Women Delivering Prematurely

      Gates, Amy; Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences (Augusta University, 2020-07)
      Objective: The objective of this study was to measure the macronutrient and micronutrient composition of breastmilk expressed by mothers, including African-American women, delivering preterm infants < 33 weeks gestational age. Our second objective was to use mother’s milk data to determine if preterm breastmilk (lactation day 7 and 28), and donor breastmilk fortified with four commonly available human milk fortifiers met the minimum recommended range of nutrients for the preterm infants. Methods: We collected breastmilk samples from mothers of preterm infants admitted to the NICU at Augusta University Medical Center (AUMC) from January-November 2019. Mother’s milk samples were collected on post-partum days 7, 14, 21, and 28 and analyzed for macronutrients and micronutrients. Using the nutrient data (means) in preterm breastmilk at lactation days 7 and 28, we calculated the nutrient composition of the fortified preterm breastmilk and donor breastmilk after the addition of four commercially available fortifiers; Enfamil® Human Milk Fortifier High Protein Liquid (EHP) (Evansville, IN), Enfamil® Human Milk Fortifier Standard Protein Liquid (ESP) (Evansville, IN), Similac® Human Milk Fortifier Hydrolyzed Protein Liquid Concentrate (SLP) (Columbus, OH), Prolacta +4 H2HMF® (PRO4) (City of Industry, CA). Results: Thirty-eight mothers, average age 27 ± 5.1 years and majority African-American (66%) provided milk for the study. The average EGA and birthweight was 28.2 ± 2.8 weeks and 1098 ± 347 grams respectively, with 42% of infants in the cohort delivering prior to the 28th week of pregnancy. Differences in protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and zinc concentration based on race, day, and milk volume were identified. Dilution effects for protein, sodium, and chloride, and vitamin D concentration over time were identified. Recommended levels of energy, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium were met with the addition of all four fortifiers. Sodium, chloride, magnesium, Vitamin D, and zinc failed to meet recommendations for mature milk or donor milk and additional supplementation of these nutrients may be warranted Conclusion: Nutrient concentration in preterm breastmilk depends on numerous factors including race, volume of milk produced, lactation stage, and gestational age. These factors should be considered when developing feeding plans for preterm infants.
    • The National Physical Therapist Assistant Examination's First Time Pass Rates and Their Relationships to Education Program Faculty Attributes

      Novak, MK; Brown-Cross, Dawn; Echternach, John; Department of Physical Therapy (Nova Southeastern University, 2011-10)
      Background and Purpose. There is a paucity of published literature regarding the correlation between faculty attributes and education program pass rates on the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE) particularly regarding the physical therapist assistant (PTA). The purpose of this study was to 1) determine if there is a relationship between faculty attributes in PTA educational programs and program outcomes on the NPTE for Physical Therapist Assistants (NPTE-PTA) and 2) construct a prediction model for PTA program outcomes based on faculty attributes. Subjects. The 233 United States’ PTA programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) in 2006 were studied. Methods. Using a retrospective design, data were obtained regarding the PTA programs from the dataset of CAPTE’s PTA annual accreditation report and the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy’s pass rate database. Selected faculty attributes (designation of highest degree conferred, years of teaching experience, employment status, license designation [physical therapist or physical therapist assistant] and clinical specialization) were correlated to first time program pass rates. Backward deletion regression was used to predict the first time pass rate on the NPTE-PTA. Results. Based on data from 190/233 PTA programs, seven attributes had a statistically significant relationship to the outcomes on the NPTE-PTA. They were the number of: 1) full-time faculty; 2) adjunct faculty with an associate’s degree; 3) full-time faculty with a terminal degree; 4) core faculty with a terminal degree; 5) all faculty with a terminal degree 6) years of teaching experience of the full-time faculty; 7) years of teaching experience of the core faculty. Backward deletion regression analyses demonstrated an overall model of two combined predictor factors (full-time faculty years of teaching and full-time faculty terminal degree) that significantly predicted the first time pass rate on the NPTE-PTA accounting for 6.5% of the variance. Discussion and Conclusion. Faculty attributes of the institutions providing PTA programs are associated with first time pass rates of their graduates. This study provides a foundation for future studies by identifying some of the faculty attributes that relate to NPTE-PTA outcomes.
    • Online Teaching

      Barefield, Amanda; Department of Health Management and Informatics (2016-10-24)
      "Have you ever wandered what it would be like to teach online, or do you cringe at the sound of the words? In this session, Dr. Barefield will share insights from her 15+ years of teaching in an online environment. Topics of discussion will include learning in the 21st century, planning an online course, developing the online course, and teaching the online course. Whether you are a newby or old pro, there will be something for everyone to discuss." Ms. Barefield has 20 years experience teaching in hybrid and online environments. She received her EdD in Instructional Technology and Distance Education from Nova Southeastern University. Her research includes evaluating student support services in online environments and comparisons of student performance in traditional and online environments. She currently teaches in both traditional and online formats for the Health Information Administration and Master of Public Health Programs.
    • Outcomes of Music, Dance, & Movement Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Within the Scope of Occupational Therapy: Scoping Review

      Bankson, Baylee; Cox, Ashlyn; Fulmer, Haley; Hausman, Lydia; Longfellow, Danielle; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-31)
      At the conclusion of this, attendees will: 1) Identify frequently measured outcomes of using music, dance, and movement-based interventions with individuals with autism spectrum disorder, as identified through a scoping review of the literature and 2) List specific music, dance, or movement-based interventions that are available to OT practitioners working with individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as identified through a scoping review of the literature.
    • Psychosocial Factors as Predictors for Patient Outcomes in Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Injury Caused by Trauma:

      Holley, Ashlyn; Saren, Madison; Wygle, Sarah; Deese, Abigail; Payne, Regan; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-26)
      At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will be able to: 1) Explain three ways in which psychosocial factors have the ability to alter rehabilitation outcomes in individuals who have sustained a traumatic upper extremity injury, 2) Discuss two gaps in the literature regarding the impact of psychosocial factors on rehabilitation outcomes in individuals recovering from traumatic upper extremity injuries, 3) Identify two methods, strategies, or assessments to be implemented in practice in order to evaluate and address psychosocial factors as a component affecting functional outcomes of clients with traumatic UE injuries.
    • Pulmonary Stress in the Alcoholic and Obese Lung

      Thomas, Amanda Blair; Department Of Undergraduate Health Professions (Augusta University, 2015-05)
      In the United States today, alcoholism and obesity are increasingly becoming issues for a vast age group from young children to geriatric adults. Alcoholism and obesity have been extensively studied as separate entities that have been proven to change metabolism and cause over-lapping health issues, which prompted us to study them in conjunction with one another, especially in the lungs. One major link between these two alarmingly common problems is Krüppel-Like Factor 4 (KLF4), a cell regulatory protein crucial to cellular normality and monocyte differentiation. This particular study highlights the effects alcoholism and obesity have on the lung, specifically epithelial cells (L2) and macrophages (AM). The goal of this project is to measure the KLF4 expression in the L2 and AM cells subjected to high ethanol (EtOH) consumption, high glucose consumption, high EtOH and glucose consumption, as well as a healthy control lung in to explain the mechanism behind decreased immune function in these patients.
    • Rehabilitation of a 38 year old male following an Arthroscopic Repair of a Type II Superior Labral Anterior Posterior (SLAP) Lesion

      Gonsalves, Vincent; Keskula, Douglas R; Department of Physical Therapy (Shenandoah University, 2013-06-25)
      Postoperative rehabilitation following arthroscopic repair of the Type II superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) biceps lesions presents a challenge to the physical therapist due to limited evidence-based reviews available within the literature. This case report describes the postoperative rehabilitation of an arthroscopic Type II SLAP repair utilizing suture anchors. The interventions and the postoperative precautions are outlined and related to the emerging evidence. The patient described was a 38 year old male electrician who sustained a work-related SLAP lesion and was referred to physical therapy for postoperative rehabilitation. Following participation in a supervised structured plan of care, the patient developed adequate strength and range of motion required for job functions and ADLs. He achieved a score of 95% on the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) functional test. Patient goals were met and he was released to full duty without restrictions at 5 months post-surgery.
    • Telehealth Interventions to Address Chronic Disease Self-Management Interventions within the Scope of Occupational Therapy: A Scoping Review

      Albritton, Liz; Fish, joJo; Henkel, Jeff; Lee, Shelby; Luttrel, Rachel; Rackleff, Layne; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-09-02)
      At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: 1) Distinguish between the types of telehealth interventions for chronic disease self-management within the scope of occupational therapy and 2) Describe the outcomes of using telehealth for chronic disease self-management based on the presented results of a scoping review of the literature.
    • Witchcraft and Physical Therapy Management: Application of the Inquiry-Based Model to Physical Therapy Education

      Keskula, Douglas R; Wark, ET; Department of Physical Therapy; Department of Physical Therapy (Georgia Health Sciences University, 2013-01-08)
      The purpose of this case report is to describe the inquiry-based model of instruction and its use in an entry-level physical therapy educational setting. Educators facilitate the acquisition of critical thinking skills through their choice and application of various instructional strategies and methodologies. The inquiry model is designed to help students problem solve by facilitating the acquisition of both analytical and process skills. Practice and mastery of these skills are beneficial to students in the health professions, as they will need to transfer these abilities to the complex clinical setting. This is particularly true of physical therapists, who practice in an increasingly autonomous manner. The use of the inquiry model as an instructional method complements a learner centered environment. The learning activity described below is used as a bridge to the examination, evaluation and diagnostic process the physical therapy students will need to master in subsequent didactic and clinical educational experiences. The selection of the problem used in the inquiry process is a key consideration to the success of the activity. The problem chosen must be interesting, intriguing and hold the attention of the students. A general problem such as the witchcraft example discussed in this paper is suitable for most disciplines, as specific clinical skills or content knowledge is not necessary for students to participate and be successful in this activity. The key element of the inquiry method is the debriefing session that concludes the activity. In the debriefing, faculty lead a guided discussion regarding the processes used by the learners to reach a viable solution to the problem. Areas examined include why certain hypotheses were formed, what information was sought and utilized by the learners to try to prove or disprove the hypotheses, and how the learners classified or grouped information together. The debriefing discussion highlights not the outcome of the problem but rather the critical reasoning process utilized by the learners to reach a conclusion, which is the primary goal of this learning activity. Students consistently respond favorably to this activity as evidenced by their active participation and positive course feedback. The faculty and students of the entry-level physical therapy program have found this activity to be a very pertinent precursor to the critical reasoning required for the clinical diagnostic process. Practical guidelines for the organization and implementation of the inquiry model as a type of instructional strategy are presented.