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This sub-community contains the Department of Health Informatics Faculty Papers, the Department of Physical Therapy Faculty Papers, and the Doctor of Physical Therapy Student Papers collections

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  • Evidence to Support Environmental and Contextual Modifications to Improve Participation in Community Events for Children with Disabilities

    Howell, Alexis; Priest, Teri; Sandy, Emily; Williams, Meghan; Kearney, Pamalyn; Rosche, Mallory; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    • Current literature has shown that children with disabilities participate less often and are not as engaged when participating compared to children without disabilities • This lack of participation might occur due to the interaction between environmental, attitudinal, and social barriers at home, at work, and during play • Participation allows children to learn about societal expectations, appropriate communication with others, develop friendships and skills they need to become successful at home, in communities, and in life • Participation is regarded as an essential aspect of child health and well being • This study aims to determine what evidence is available to support modifications to environments and contexts to improve participation in community events for children with disabilities under the age of 18.
  • Evidence Related to Setting, Structure, and Outcomes of Occupational Therapy Nontraditional Level II Fieldwork: A Scoping Review

    Graham, Maggie; Hartman, Kylee; LeMasters, MacKenzie; Moore, Brette; Reed, Lilly; Thrysoe, Gitte; Vera, Laurie; Kearney, Pamalyn; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    Definition: Nontraditional Fieldwork (NTFW): Site where OT services may be unavailable prior to implementation • May be supervised by an employee of organization1 or an OT • ACOTE: full time FW hours for 24 weeks graduation eligibility2 Gaps in the literature include: • Definition of NTFW • Amount of supervision • Sample size variations between traditional FW and NTFW • How students engage with patients in NTFW settings • Information to support and inform all stakeholders about difficulties in NTFW settings • Results on student educational success in NTFW Purpose: to address the gap in the literature by looking at widely available sources to provide relevant insight into nontraditional Level II Fieldwork for the interested audience.
  • Assessments Evaluating the Relationship Between Psychosocial Factors and Upper Extremity Trauma: A Scoping Review

    Coleman, Isabelle; Glaze, Morgan; Griffin, Caroline; Holbrooks, Sarah Beth; Moore, Kristen; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    Objectives of Presentation: At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: ● Identify 3 current assessments available that evaluate the psychosocial components of upper extremity (UE) recovery after trauma. ● Discuss 3 of the most common types of psychosocial challenges often experienced by individuals with UE trauma. Clinical/Research Question: What assessments are available for examining the relationships between psychosocial factors and UE trauma during rehabilitation of adults with UE trauma?
  • A Scoping Review of International Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Evidence

    Smith, Gloria; Holton, Emily; Peeler, Michaela; Stancil, Reagan; Johnson, Stephanie; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    • Gap in literature: Best practices for allied health international interprofessional collaboration and education • Collaboration better coordinates interprofessional care for best patient centered focus. • Interprofessional education improves health outcomes, sets foundation for future health care professionals, and provides basis for communication, collaboration, and patient care. • Allied Health Professions: Those which require practitioners to attend a higher level institution, obtain a certificate, and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals to provide care to individuals suffering from acute and chronic diseases, rehabilitation services, and dietary and nutrition services in several settings. Research Question: Among allied health science disciplines, what is the evidence supporting outcomes as related to international interprofessional education and collaborative experiences?
  • Intraprofessional Educational Activities Implemented by Occupational Therapy Programs in the United States

    Eller, Sydney; Morris, Emma; Parker, Olivia; Ruble, Charlotte; Speciale, Natalie; Usry, Jenna; Watford, Patricia; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    ● Intraprofessional collaboration has been shown to increase:2. 3 ○Confidence ○Patient care ○Ethical compliance ○Cost-effective care ●The accrediting body for occupational therapy education, ACOTE, requires that OT and OTA programs address: ○Intraprofessionalcollaboration ○How to engage in the consultative process, evaluation process, and treatment process with their intraprofessionalcolleagues.1 ●An unpublished survey from 2019 found that 68% of programs included intraprofessional collaboration in their curriculum4despite requirements from ACOTE.1 ●Our research questions are: What is the prevalence of intraprofessional collaboration in occupational therapy education programs and what strategies are used to implement intraprofessional activities?
  • Perceptions of International Fieldwork Experiences on Professional and Personal Development for Occupational Therapy Students

    Bauknight, Rebekah; Cutcliff, Kelley; Ford, Emma; Lenz, Kendall; Long, Cassidy; Swift, Sharon; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    The Augusta University Occupational Therapy Program offers two Level I international fieldwork experiences (IFEs) to Jamaica each year. One IFE is offered early in the curriculum, while the other is offered later. •Existing research demonstrates that International Educational Experiences (IEEs) allow students to develop: •Valuable personal and professional skills.1 •Improved communication, patient care, and adaptability.2 •Autonomy and lifelong learning.3 •Previous work from students at Augusta University evaluated differences between domestic and international occupational therapy students’ perceptions on Level I international fieldwork.4,5 •Images 1-3 demonstrate student engagement with clients during the IFE, and demonstrate previous findings that overall, the IFE was found to more greatly impact student’s perceived personal and professional development than domestic FW. •Further research is needed to determine if the amount of credit hours obtained prior to the IFE has an impact on students’ perceived development. The purpose of this studywas to compare Early Program Participants’ (EPPs) perceptions versus Later Program Participants’ (LPPs) perceptions of the Level I IFE on their personal and professional development. •EPPs: 14 credit hours obtained prior to the trip. •LPPs: 32+ credit hours obtained prior to the trip. Hypothesis: LPPs’ average scores pertaining to perceived personal and professional development would be greater than EPPs’ due to advancement in the curriculum, allowing for increased opportunities to gain confidence and apply OT knowledge.
  • Prevalence of Holistic Admission Criteria Among Entry-Level Occupational Therapy Programs

    Taylor, Kristian; Nguyen, Cat-Tien; Grant, Jenny; Brewster, Mary Beth; Barrett, Mary Alice; Benevides, Teal; Cosper, Sharon M.; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    Objectives of Presentation: At the conclusion of this poster, attendees will: 1. Describe the difference between holistic admissions and academic metric- only procedures implemented by entry-level occupational therapy programs. 2. Discuss the relationship between implementation of holistic admissions criteria and entry-level occupational therapy program ranking. Research Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the holistic admissions criteria used by the top fifty ranked entry-level occupational therapy master’s and doctoral programs to the fifty lowest ranked programs.
  • Disparities in Autism Educational Classification in the United States: A Summary of Public-School Data in Three States in Autism Educational Classification in the United States: A Summary of Public-School Data in Three States

    Bevil, Bailey; Breitmann, Shelby; Dyals, Bethany; Franke, Catherine; Hassett, Anna; Padgett, Gracie; Benevides, Teal; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    • Problem: Limited research exists to describe and understand disparities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) classification across counties in the United States. A classification of ASD is valuable as it provides the child with greater access and provision of resources both within and outside of the school system. • Research has shown that definitions and evaluation procedures vary among states (Pennington et al, 2014). • Some individuals who have autism spectrum disorder do not obtain a diagnosis of ASD until they are into their adolescence or adulthood (Centers of Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2020). • Early intervention for autism spectrum disorder can increase positive outcomes (CDC, 2020). • Only 58% of children who meet the criteria for a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder have it documented in their education or health records (Mandell et al, 2009). • Purpose Statement: This study sought to collect data demonstrating ASD disparities in three states, Massachusetts, Louisiana, and New York, in the United States as it relates to classification and accessibility to school-based services.
  • Development and Characterization of a Closed-Head Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Model

    Alverson, Katelyn; Clinical Laboratory Sciences (Augusta University, 2020-12)
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide and places an enormous economic burden on both families and health care systems that provide support for survivors. The majority of TBI cases are deemed mild (mTBI) and go undetected due to the less discernable signs and symptoms. However, there is increasing evidence that mTBI can lead to detrimental chronic consequences. Unfortunately, the mTBI research field is still in its infancy. We set out to develop a model of closed-head mTBI that recapitulated mTBI in the clinic. Using a murine controlled cortical impact model, we show no structural damage, increased edema, behavioral deficits, cell death and decreased synapses in the acute time after the mTBI. We also evaluated the chronic behavioral changes from two weeks to three months post TBI. All in all, our mTBI model showed significant cellular changes, but did not give robust chronic behavioral results. A secondary outcome of our study was the evaluation of a potential therapeutic: remote ischemic conditioning (RIC). Acutely, RIC improved edema, behavioral outcomes, cell death, and synapse loss. Overall, our study does identify key areas that should be recapitulated in further development of the model: no structural damage, little to no edema, cell death and decreased synapses, and behavioral changes. This model also requires further investigation into the chronic consequences of mTBI as well as the use of RIC.
  • Psychosocial Factors as Predictors for Patient Outcomes in Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Injury Caused by Trauma:

    Holley, Ashlyn; Saren, Madison; Wygle, Sarah; Deese, Abigail; Payne, Regan; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-26)
    At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will be able to: 1) Explain three ways in which psychosocial factors have the ability to alter rehabilitation outcomes in individuals who have sustained a traumatic upper extremity injury, 2) Discuss two gaps in the literature regarding the impact of psychosocial factors on rehabilitation outcomes in individuals recovering from traumatic upper extremity injuries, 3) Identify two methods, strategies, or assessments to be implemented in practice in order to evaluate and address psychosocial factors as a component affecting functional outcomes of clients with traumatic UE injuries.
  • Telehealth Interventions to Address Chronic Disease Self-Management Interventions within the Scope of Occupational Therapy: A Scoping Review

    Albritton, Liz; Fish, joJo; Henkel, Jeff; Lee, Shelby; Luttrel, Rachel; Rackleff, Layne; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-09-02)
    At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: 1) Distinguish between the types of telehealth interventions for chronic disease self-management within the scope of occupational therapy and 2) Describe the outcomes of using telehealth for chronic disease self-management based on the presented results of a scoping review of the literature.
  • The Effects of Interprofessional Education on Occupational Therapy Student Practitioner Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    Adams, Emma; Carlto, Meg; Kali, Todd; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-09-01)
    Objectives of Presentation: 1) Understand and communicate the effects that various evidence based interprofessional education interventions have on occupational therapy student outcomes. and 2) Discuss the gaps in the literature, indicated by this systematic review, as they relate to interprofessional education and its effects.
  • Benefits of International Fieldwork for Occupational Therapy Students

    Vickman, Hannah; Carter, Krissy; Dittmer, Chandler; Nettles, Taylor; Wang, Caroline; McCarley, Trinity; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-09-01)
    At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: 1) Identify the perceived benefits for international fieldwork ascertained from the research and how that relates to professional and personal development, and 2) Identify the key clinical experience differences between OT students participating in international and domestic fieldwork, as established from the presented research.
  • Evidence supporting interventions within the scope of occupational therapy for addressing

    Arnold, Jackie; Cyr, Emily; Garner, Kathryn; Long, Tori; Robles, Alexis; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-26)
    At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: a) List three effective interventions to address cognitive and psychological factors in chronic pain based on the presented scoping review of the literature, and b) Articulate the importance of cognitive/psychosocial factors in relation to chronic pain.
  • Outcomes of Music, Dance, & Movement Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Within the Scope of Occupational Therapy: Scoping Review

    Bankson, Baylee; Cox, Ashlyn; Fulmer, Haley; Hausman, Lydia; Longfellow, Danielle; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-31)
    At the conclusion of this, attendees will: 1) Identify frequently measured outcomes of using music, dance, and movement-based interventions with individuals with autism spectrum disorder, as identified through a scoping review of the literature and 2) List specific music, dance, or movement-based interventions that are available to OT practitioners working with individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as identified through a scoping review of the literature.
  • Micronutrient and Macronutrient Composition of Breastmilk from Women Delivering Prematurely

    Gates, Amy; Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences (Augusta University, 2020-07)
    Objective: The objective of this study was to measure the macronutrient and micronutrient composition of breastmilk expressed by mothers, including African-American women, delivering preterm infants < 33 weeks gestational age. Our second objective was to use mother’s milk data to determine if preterm breastmilk (lactation day 7 and 28), and donor breastmilk fortified with four commonly available human milk fortifiers met the minimum recommended range of nutrients for the preterm infants. Methods: We collected breastmilk samples from mothers of preterm infants admitted to the NICU at Augusta University Medical Center (AUMC) from January-November 2019. Mother’s milk samples were collected on post-partum days 7, 14, 21, and 28 and analyzed for macronutrients and micronutrients. Using the nutrient data (means) in preterm breastmilk at lactation days 7 and 28, we calculated the nutrient composition of the fortified preterm breastmilk and donor breastmilk after the addition of four commercially available fortifiers; Enfamil® Human Milk Fortifier High Protein Liquid (EHP) (Evansville, IN), Enfamil® Human Milk Fortifier Standard Protein Liquid (ESP) (Evansville, IN), Similac® Human Milk Fortifier Hydrolyzed Protein Liquid Concentrate (SLP) (Columbus, OH), Prolacta +4 H2HMF® (PRO4) (City of Industry, CA). Results: Thirty-eight mothers, average age 27 ± 5.1 years and majority African-American (66%) provided milk for the study. The average EGA and birthweight was 28.2 ± 2.8 weeks and 1098 ± 347 grams respectively, with 42% of infants in the cohort delivering prior to the 28th week of pregnancy. Differences in protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and zinc concentration based on race, day, and milk volume were identified. Dilution effects for protein, sodium, and chloride, and vitamin D concentration over time were identified. Recommended levels of energy, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium were met with the addition of all four fortifiers. Sodium, chloride, magnesium, Vitamin D, and zinc failed to meet recommendations for mature milk or donor milk and additional supplementation of these nutrients may be warranted Conclusion: Nutrient concentration in preterm breastmilk depends on numerous factors including race, volume of milk produced, lactation stage, and gestational age. These factors should be considered when developing feeding plans for preterm infants.
  • In Vivo Pilot Study: Effect of Dehydration/Rehydration on Upper Anterior Tooth Color Change

    Britton, Eduardo; Nappi, A; Cao, T; Shepherd, K; Department of General Dentistry, Dental Hygiene, Department of Restorative Sciences (Augusta University Libraries, 2019)
    Isolation of tooth structure during fabrication of a bonded, direct, resin-based restoration is essential to optimizing its potential for long-term clinical success. Failure to protect etched enamel and bonding agents from contamination by saliva results in inadequate and unpredictable interfacial bonding of the restorative composite, potentially leading to marginal discoloration, open margins, recurrent decay, or ultimately to restoration loss or failure. A consequence of tooth isolation during placement of direct, esthetic restorative resins is the dehydration of enamel surfaces that will not be coated with saliva, and will, over time, lose water that has penetrated into the outer enamel layers (will dehydrate). The longer the tooth isolation time, the greater will be the subsequent loss of water from enamel. Presence of this water in enamel helps to provide for a stable tooth color. In teeth, the observed tooth color is the result of internal light penetration and interaction with tissues below the surface. Enamel is a translucent material, passing a great majority of transmitted light to fall on the more opaque and yellow-colored tissue underneath of it: dentin. In the hydrated state, enamel is more translucent than in its dehydrated state. The white opaque appearance of dehydrated enamel can be of great clinical concern, once a rubber dam has been removed, and the treated teeth with newly placed restorations are observed. Usually, because of the opaque, white nature of recently dehydrated enamel, there is an initial mismatch between an esthetic restoration just placed and its surrounding, remaining enamel. Patients are normally forwarded of this consequence, and are advised that a period of time needs to pass before the surrounding enamel becomes rehydrated, and more translucent (less opaque), before its pre-isolated color returns to a natural state. It is hoped that, at that time, the new restoration will perfectly match the color characteristics of the remaining enamel, and the recent replacement will not be visible at all, but will instead optically blend in without notice. However, prior to that time, there are definitely distinct color differences between a recently placed resin restoration and its surrounding tooth structure. To date, little-to-no information is available on the rate at which a clinician or patient can expect isolated enamel to return to its pre-isolated color, and when to expect this esthetic blending to occur.
  • ADIPOSE HDAC9 DELETION PROTECT AGAINST DIET INDUCED OBESITY IN MICE THROUGH REGULATING ENERGY EXPENDITURE

    Hassan, Nazeera; Zarzour, Abdalrahman; Department of Biological Sciences; Department of Medicine; College of Allied Health Sciences; Kim, Ha Won; Weintraub, Neal; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
    Our group has previously identified histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) as a regulator of adipocyte differentiation, and its expression levels were elevated in diet induced obese (DIO) mice.� We also reported that global HDAC9 deletion protected mice against DIO through promoting beige adipogenesis. Here, we hypothesized that adipose HDAC9 correlate with human obesity similar to murine models, and its deletion is sufficient to protect against DIO. To test this hypothesis we crossed HDAC9 floxed mice with adiponectin-cre mice to generate adipose-specific HDAC9 knockout mice (AdipCre-HDAC9), which exhibited 30% less weight gain when fed high fat diet compared to control despite increased food intake, in association with increased energy combustion & O2 consumption, improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. However, unlike global HDAC9 deletion, this was not associated with increased beige adipogenesis nor increase in brown adipose tissue function. Interestingly, AdipoCre-HDAC9 mice fed normal chow diet didn�t exhibit altered energy expenditure nor weight differences when compared to littermate controls. These finding suggest that adipose HDAC9 regulate energy expenditure in response to high fat diet and can be a promising therapeutic target to combat obesity.
  • EFFECTS OF CHRONIC ALOHOL AND GLUCOSE EXPOSURE ON VIABILITY OF ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    Keller, Elizabeth; College of Science and Mathematics; College of Allied Health; Curry-McCoy, Tiana; Thomas, Amanda; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
    The adverse health risks associated with alcohol abuse and obesity are widely known by the general population. Although lesser known, studies have presented the lungs as secondary organs affected by such lifestyle factors. Healthy lungs are protected against infection and harmful airborne particles by macrophages, the working entities of the immune system which fight potential sources of infection. When these immune-responsive cells are compromised and unable to perform their functions, lung health may deteriorate. Therefore, a healthy pulmonary alveolar macrophage population is vital for adequate lung function. Chronic alcohol abuse and obesity have been shown to suppress alveolar macrophage function, thus lowering the lungs� first line of defense. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of exogenous ethanol and increased glucose concentration on macrophage size and viability via an�in vitro�study on NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages. The study measures macrophage viability under treatment conditions.

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