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dc.contributor.authorSchott, Bjorn H.
dc.contributor.authorSeidenbecher, Constanze I.
dc.contributor.authorRichter, Sylvia
dc.contributor.authorWustenberg, Torsten
dc.contributor.authorDebska-Vielhaber, Grazyna
dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Heike
dc.contributor.authorHeinze, Hans-Jochen
dc.contributor.authorRichardson-Klavehn, Alan
dc.contributor.authorDuzel, Emrah
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T20:27:14Z
dc.date.available2012-10-26T20:27:14Z
dc.date.issued2011-01-18en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2011 Jan 18; 6(1):e15984en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21267461en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0015984en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/731
dc.description.abstractSerotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neuromodulator in learning and memory processes. A functional genetic polymorphism of the 5-HT 2a receptor (5-HTR2a His452Tyr), which leads to blunted intracellular signaling, has previously been associated with explicit memory performance in several independent cohorts, but the underlying neural mechanisms are thus far unclear. The human hippocampus plays a critical role in memory, particularly in the detection and encoding of novel information. Here we investigated the relationship of 5-HTR2a His452Tyr and hippocampal novelty processing in 41 young, healthy subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants performed a novelty/familiarity task with complex scene stimuli, which was followed by a delayed recognition memory test 24 hours later. Compared to His homozygotes, Tyr carriers exhibited a diminished hippocampal response to novel stimuli and a higher tendency to judge novel stimuli as familiar during delayed recognition. Across the cohort, the false alarm rate during delayed recognition correlated negatively with the hippocampal novelty response. Our results suggest that previously reported effects of 5-HTR2a on explicit memory performance may, at least in part, be mediated by alterations of hippocampal novelty processing.
dc.rightsSchott et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectComputational Biologyen_US
dc.subjectPopulation Geneticsen_US
dc.subjectGenetic Polymorphismen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectNeurochemistryen_US
dc.subjectNeurochemicalsen_US
dc.subjectSerotoninen_US
dc.subjectNeuroimagingen_US
dc.subjectFmrien_US
dc.subjectLearning and Memoryen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectMental Healthen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectNeurologyen_US
dc.subjectNeuroimagingen_US
dc.subjectSocial and Behavioral Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.titleGenetic Variation of the Serotonin 2a Receptor Affects Hippocampal Novelty Processing in Humansen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3022731en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Neurology
dc.contributor.corporatenameCollege of Graduate Studies
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T00:41:15Z
html.description.abstractSerotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neuromodulator in learning and memory processes. A functional genetic polymorphism of the 5-HT 2a receptor (5-HTR2a His452Tyr), which leads to blunted intracellular signaling, has previously been associated with explicit memory performance in several independent cohorts, but the underlying neural mechanisms are thus far unclear. The human hippocampus plays a critical role in memory, particularly in the detection and encoding of novel information. Here we investigated the relationship of 5-HTR2a His452Tyr and hippocampal novelty processing in 41 young, healthy subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants performed a novelty/familiarity task with complex scene stimuli, which was followed by a delayed recognition memory test 24 hours later. Compared to His homozygotes, Tyr carriers exhibited a diminished hippocampal response to novel stimuli and a higher tendency to judge novel stimuli as familiar during delayed recognition. Across the cohort, the false alarm rate during delayed recognition correlated negatively with the hippocampal novelty response. Our results suggest that previously reported effects of 5-HTR2a on explicit memory performance may, at least in part, be mediated by alterations of hippocampal novelty processing.


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