• Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Maps in Follicular Lymphoma Cells Determined by Methylation-Enriched Bisulfite Sequencing

      Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Li, Yajun; Guo, Juyuan; Pei, Lirong; Rauch, Tibor A.; Kramer, Robin S.; Macmil, Simone L.; Wiley, Graham B.; Bennett, Lynda B.; Schnabel, Jennifer L.; et al. (2010-09-29)
      Background: Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) that arises from germinal center (GC) B-cells. Despite the significant advances in immunotherapy, FL is still not curable. Beyond transcriptional profiling and genomics datasets, there currently is no epigenome-scale dataset or integrative biology approach that can adequately model this disease and therefore identify novel mechanisms and targets for successful prevention and treatment of FL.
    • Targeting HSP90 for cancer therapy

      Mahalingam, D; Swords, R; Carew, Jennifer S; Nawrocki, S T; Bhalla, Kapil N.; Giles, F J; GHSU Cancer Center (2009-04-28)
      Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that regulate protein folding to ensure correct conformation and translocation and to avoid protein aggregation. Heat-shock proteins are increased in many solid tumours and haematological malignancies. Many oncogenic proteins responsible for the transformation of cells to cancerous forms are client proteins of HSP90. Targeting HSP90 with chemical inhibitors would degrade these oncogenic proteins, and thus serve as useful anticancer agents. This review provides an overview of the HSP chaperone machinery and the structure and function of HSP90. We also highlight the key oncogenic proteins that are regulated by HSP90 and describe how inhibition of HSP90 could alter the activity of multiple signalling proteins, receptors and transcriptional factors implicated in carcinogenesis.
    • Modulation of the DNA-binding activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MSH2-MSH6 complex by the high-mobility group protein NHP6A, in vitro.

      Labazi, Mohamed; Jaafar, Lahcen; Flores-Rozas, Hernan; GHSU Cancer Center (2009-12-16)
      DNA mismatch repair corrects mispaired bases and small insertions/deletions in DNA. In eukaryotes, the mismatch repair complex MSH2-MSH6 binds to mispairs with only slightly higher affinity than to fully paired DNA in vitro. Recently, the high-mobility group box1 protein, (HMGB1), has been shown to stimulate the mismatch repair reaction in vitro. In yeast, the closest homologs of HMGB1 are NHP6A and NHP6B. These proteins have been shown to be required for genome stability maintenance and mutagenesis control. In this work, we show that MSH2-MSH6 and NHP6A modulate their binding to DNA in vitro. Binding of the yeast MSH2-MSH6 to homoduplex regions of DNA significantly stimulates the loading of NHP6A. Upon binding of NHP6A to DNA, MSH2-MSH6 is excluded from binding unless a mismatch is present. A DNA binding-impaired MSH2-MSH6F337A significantly reduced the loading of NHP6A to DNA, suggesting that MSH2-MSH6 binding is a requisite for NHP6A loading. MSH2-MSH6 and NHP6A form a stable complex, which is responsive to ATP on mismatched substrates. These results suggest that MSH2-MSH6 binding to homoduplex regions of DNA recruits NHP6A, which then prevents further binding of MSH2-MSH6 to these sites unless a mismatch is present.
    • Ploidy status and copy number aberrations in primary glioblastomas defined by integrated analysis of allelic ratios, signal ratios and loss of heterozygosity using 500K SNP Mapping Arrays.

      Gardina, Paul J; Lo, Ken C; Lee, Walter; Cowell, John K.; Turpaz, Yaron; GHSU Cancer Center (2008-10-30)
      BACKGROUND: Genomic hybridization platforms, including BAC-CGH and genotyping arrays, have been used to estimate chromosome copy number (CN) in tumor samples by detecting the relative strength of genomic signal. The methods rely on the assumption that the predominant chromosomal background of the samples is diploid, an assumption that is frequently incorrect for tumor samples. In addition to generally greater resolution, an advantage of genotyping arrays over CGH arrays is the ability to detect signals from individual alleles, allowing estimation of loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) and allelic ratios to enhance the interpretation of copy number alterations. Copy number events associated with LOH potentially have the same genetic consequences as deletions. RESULTS: We have utilized allelic ratios to detect patterns that are indicative of higher ploidy levels. An integrated analysis using allelic ratios, total signal and LOH indicates that many or most of the chromosomes from 24 glioblastoma tumors are in fact aneuploid. Some putative whole-chromosome losses actually represent trisomy, and many apparent sub-chromosomal losses are in fact relative losses against a triploid or tetraploid background. CONCLUSION: These results suggest a re-interpretation of previous findings based only on total signal ratios. One interesting observation is that many single or multiple-copy deletions occur at common putative tumor suppressor sites subsequent to chromosomal duplication; these losses do not necessarily result in LOH, but nonetheless occur in conspicuous patterns. The 500 K Mapping array was also capable of detecting many sub-mega base losses and gains that were overlooked by CGH-BAC arrays, and was superior to CGH-BAC arrays in resolving regions of complex CN variation.
    • Normal colon epithelium: a dataset for the analysis of gene expression and alternative splicing events in colon disease.

      Mojica, Wilfrido; Hawthorn, Lesleyann; GHSU Cancer Center (2010-02-18)
      BACKGROUND: Studies using microarray analysis of colorectal cancer have been generally beleaguered by the lack of a normal cell population of the same lineage as the tumor cell. One of the main objectives of this study was to generate a reference gene expression data set for normal colonic epithelium which can be used in comparisons with diseased tissues, as well as to provide a dataset that could be used as a baseline for studies in alternative splicing. RESULTS: We present a dependable expression reference data set for non-neoplastic colonic epithelial cells. An enriched population of fresh colon epithelial cells were obtained from non-neoplastic, colectomy specimens and analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChip EXON 1.0 ST arrays. For demonstration purposes, we have compared the data derived from these cells to a publically available set of tumor and matched normal colon data. This analysis allowed an assessment of global gene expression alterations and demonstrated that adjacent normal tissues, with a high degree of cellular heterogeneity, are not always representative of normal cells for comparison to tumors which arise from the colon epithelium. We also examined alternative splicing events in tumors compared to normal colon epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: The findings from this study represent the first comprehensive expression profile for non-neoplastic colonic epithelial cells reported. Our analysis of splice variants illustrate that this is a very labor intensive procedure, requiring vigilant examination of the data. It is projected that the contribution of this set of data derived from pure colonic epithelial cells will enhance studies in colon-related disease and offer a vital baseline for studies aimed at elucidating the mechanisms of alternative splicing.