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dc.contributor.authorSpingath, Elsie Y.
dc.contributor.authorKang, Hyun Sug
dc.contributor.authorPlummer, Thane
dc.contributor.authorBlake, David T.
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T16:26:56Z
dc.date.available2012-10-26T16:26:56Z
dc.date.issued2011-01-31en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2011 Jan 31; 6(1):e15342en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21297962en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0015342en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/632
dc.description.abstractAdult learning-induced sensory cortex plasticity results in enhanced action potential rates in neurons that have the most relevant information for the task, or those that respond strongly to one sensory stimulus but weakly to its comparison stimulus. Current theories suggest this plasticity is caused when target stimulus evoked activity is enhanced by reward signals from neuromodulatory nuclei. Prior work has found evidence suggestive of nonselective enhancement of neural responses, and suppression of responses to task distractors, but the differences in these effects between detection and discrimination have not been directly tested. Using cortical implants, we defined physiological responses in macaque somatosensory cortex during serial, matched, detection and discrimination tasks. Nonselective increases in neural responsiveness were observed during detection learning. Suppression of responses to task distractors was observed during discrimination learning, and this suppression was specific to cortical locations that sampled responses to the task distractor before learning. Changes in receptive field size were measured as the area of skin that had a significant response to a constant magnitude stimulus, and these areal changes paralleled changes in responsiveness. From before detection learning until after discrimination learning, the enduring changes were selective suppression of cortical locations responsive to task distractors, and nonselective enhancement of responsiveness at cortical locations selective for target and control skin sites. A comparison of observations in prior studies with the observed plasticity effects suggests that the non-selective response enhancement and selective suppression suffice to explain known plasticity phenomena in simple spatial tasks. This work suggests that differential responsiveness to task targets and distractors in primary sensory cortex for a simple spatial detection and discrimination task arise from nonselective increases in response over a broad cortical locus that includes the representation of the task target, and selective suppression of responses to the task distractor within this locus.
dc.rightsSpingath et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectAnatomy and Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurological Systemen_US
dc.subjectSensory Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectModel Organismsen_US
dc.subjectAnimal Modelsen_US
dc.subjectMacaqueen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectNeurochemistryen_US
dc.subjectNeuromodulationen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectLearning and Memoryen_US
dc.subjectNeurophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectSensory Systemsen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectAnatomy and Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectSensory Systemsen_US
dc.titleDifferent Neuroplasticity for Task Targets and Distractorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3031528en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameBrain & Behavior Discovery Institute
dc.contributor.corporatenameGraduate Program in Neuroscience
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Neurology
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T00:21:56Z
html.description.abstractAdult learning-induced sensory cortex plasticity results in enhanced action potential rates in neurons that have the most relevant information for the task, or those that respond strongly to one sensory stimulus but weakly to its comparison stimulus. Current theories suggest this plasticity is caused when target stimulus evoked activity is enhanced by reward signals from neuromodulatory nuclei. Prior work has found evidence suggestive of nonselective enhancement of neural responses, and suppression of responses to task distractors, but the differences in these effects between detection and discrimination have not been directly tested. Using cortical implants, we defined physiological responses in macaque somatosensory cortex during serial, matched, detection and discrimination tasks. Nonselective increases in neural responsiveness were observed during detection learning. Suppression of responses to task distractors was observed during discrimination learning, and this suppression was specific to cortical locations that sampled responses to the task distractor before learning. Changes in receptive field size were measured as the area of skin that had a significant response to a constant magnitude stimulus, and these areal changes paralleled changes in responsiveness. From before detection learning until after discrimination learning, the enduring changes were selective suppression of cortical locations responsive to task distractors, and nonselective enhancement of responsiveness at cortical locations selective for target and control skin sites. A comparison of observations in prior studies with the observed plasticity effects suggests that the non-selective response enhancement and selective suppression suffice to explain known plasticity phenomena in simple spatial tasks. This work suggests that differential responsiveness to task targets and distractors in primary sensory cortex for a simple spatial detection and discrimination task arise from nonselective increases in response over a broad cortical locus that includes the representation of the task target, and selective suppression of responses to the task distractor within this locus.


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