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dc.contributor.authorKolluri, Krishna
dc.date.accessioned2023-08-03T18:11:05Z
dc.date.available2023-08-03T18:11:05Z
dc.date.issued2023-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/624707
dc.descriptionThe file you are attempting to access is restricted to Augusta University. Please login using your JagNet iD and password.en_US
dc.description.abstractPeripheral artery disease is a common circulatory problem in which narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to the limbs. It is caused by the buildup of fatty acid deposits on the arterial walls. When this disease progresses, it affects the quality of life regarding mobility, and in severe cases the disease could possibly lead to an amputation of the limbs as well as even death. Chronic inflammation is the driving force of peripheral arterial disease. Inflammation is a protective response intended to eliminate the initial cause of cell injury, as well as the necrotic cells and tissues resulting from that injury a protective response intended to eliminate the initial cause of cell injury, as well as the necrotic cells and tissues resulting from that injury. Broadly, there are two types of macrophages classified as M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 macrophages exhibit inflammatory functions with a phenotype characterized by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines that promote and sustain chronic inflammation which could be detrimental to health. M1 macrophages tend to produce IFN-gamma as the activation of that macrophage. On the other hand, the M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory functions and have a phenotype characterized by their involvement in tissue remodeling and immune regulation. M2 macrophages tend to produce IL-4 as the activation of that macrophage. These macrophages help suppress inflammation. Understanding the phenotypic differences in M1 and M2 macrophages is important as they are critical regulators of several pathologies including peripheral artery disease. Although we have these two significant classifications of macrophages as M1 and M2, the macrophage characterization is certainly not an adequate methodology in depicting the range of macrophage populations. Though there are many treatments to peripheral arterial disease such as stents and coated balloons, neither treatment produces durable clinical outcomes but rather have been associated with an increased mortality rate. Researchers are currently identifying macrophages as a novel therapeutic target for peripheral arterial disease.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAugusta Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en_US
dc.titleCharacterizing ischemia-induced macrophage phenotypic switch in peripheral arterial diseaseen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentVascular Biologyen_US
dc.description.advisorGanta, Vijay
dc.description.committeeGanta, Vijay; Patel, Ruchi; Kakkada, Abdul Malmi


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