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dc.contributor.authorJackson, Lauren
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-23T17:00:04Z
dc.date.available2021-03-23T17:00:04Z
dc.date.issued2020-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/623921
dc.descriptionThe file you are attempting to access is restricted to Augusta University. Please login using your JagNet iD and password.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent times, there has been an increase in self-reported mental health issues in college students (1). This increase is not due to the fact that there are more students with mental health issues, but because there is an increased societal awareness and a lesser stigma in receiving help for these issues (1). In response to the increase of students with self-reported mental health issues, many institutions of higher education are taking steps to meet the demand by re-evaluating existing student wellness clinics and initiatives (1). The Healthy Universities System was created to improve the overall physical and mental wellness of college students, with the purpose of providing university systems with guidelines that will promote health and well-being on their campuses. A Healthy University is an institution that has “a holistic understanding of health; takes a Whole University approach; and aspires to create a learning environment and organizational culture that enhances the health, well-being, and sustainability of its community” (2). The system is currently operated and funded by the University of Central Lancashire and Manchester Metropolitan University, and co-chaired by Mark Dooris and Sue Powell who are faculty at the respective institutions. Although the Healthy University system focuses on developing student health policy at universities in the United Kingdom, the resources used to design a Healthy University are readily available on the system’s website and can be implemented at any institution of higher education. There are several approaches to implementing Healthy University initiatives: Whole System, Health and Sustainable Development, Health and Well-being, Mental Well-being, Student Experience and Performance, and Staff Experience and Performance (3). This study will focus on the Healthy University mental well-being approach and mental health awareness as it relates to the undergraduate student population at Augusta University. The mental well-being approach emphasizes the importance of university awareness regarding the “impact of stigma, social inclusion, and access issues associated with mental wellbeing, and to be proactive in addressing them” (4). It also asks universities to evaluate the mental health support services provided to students and staff, and to conduct qualitative or quantitative research on those services to ensure their efficacy, and to improve overall well-being (4). Case studies that detail a university’s approach to becoming a Healthy University provides a baseline of how initiatives to support student health through programming can be implemented on college campuses around the world. Studies done on the Healthy University approach show that as a result of programming, “students are more likely to value and prioritize health and well-being” (5).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAugusta Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en_US
dc.subjectHealthy University; mental health; Augusta Universityen_US
dc.titleImplementing the Healthy University Approach to Mental Health at Augusta Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychological Sciencesen_US
dc.description.advisorHeboyan, Vahé
dc.description.committeeBest, Candace
dc.description.committeeGuerrero-Millan, Josefa
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-23T17:00:05Z


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