Recent Submissions

  • Direct Composite restorations Using a Clear PVS Matrix to restore Worn Anterior Dentition to Create an Ideal Occlusal Plane

    Fowlkes, Colton; Romero, M; Urbanawiz, D; Department of Restorative Sciences (Augusta University, 2019)
    This clicnical case documents the use of a clear PVS matrix technique to restore the incisal edges of worn mandibular anterior teeth using flowable composite to provide a 20 degree template for eventual complete maxillary denture and mandibular removable partial denture frabrication.
  • Conservative Porcelain Veneer: Step by step protocol for ideal preparation

    Wooten, Rebekah; Coleman, J; Pruett, M; Romeo, M (Augusta University, 2019)
    Since the 1930s laminate veneers have been commonly used to improve appearance of teeth, but they did not become popular until enamel etching and porcelain surface treatments made them more clinically predictable in the 1980s.1 Over the years, they have been indicated to modify the color, shape, length and alignment of teeth to improve their esthetic appearance. Contraindications include severely discolored teeth and lack of enamel remaining to support the restoration.3 Treatment planning is the first step to ideal veneer preparation, which involves determining the incisal edge position, shape and proportions of the teeth being restored. This information is obtained form the diagnostic wax-up and subsequent esthetic mock-up. Veneer preparations often follow one of two common reduction patterns: conservative or standard. The difference between the two being the amount of tooth structure removed. The conservative approach involves reduction of 0.3 mm gingival third, 0.5 mm middle third, and 0.7 mm incisal third; or no reduction may be required. The standard preparation typically follows a reduction pattern of 0.8 mm gingival, 1.0 mm middle, and 1.2 mm incisal. Incisal reduction can be characteristic of either technique to allow room for the addition of incisal effects such as halo and translucency. In order to ensure porcelain veneers have the maximum lifetime expectancy, it is imperative to have preparations entirely in enamel. Bonding porcelain veneers to enamel increases their fracture strength. 2 Based on the best available evidence the ten year survival rate for porcelain veneers is at around 95% if bonded to enamel.1 Maxillary midline diastemas (MMD) are present in 28% of the population, and 87.5% of females with a midline diastema are dissatisfied and seek treatment.3 This clinical report focuses on the clinical management of a maxillary midline diastema (MMD) with porcelain veneers through a conservative preparation and incisal reduction.
  • ACRYLATE/METHACRYLATE CONTENT AMONG A VARIETY OF 3D PRINTING RESINS

    Walker, Dylan; Villalobos, V; Rueggeberg, FA; Brenes, C; Department of Restorative Sciences, Department of General Dentistry (Augusta University, 2019)
    The purposes of this research were to apply an infrared spectroscopic analytical method to differentiate among a variety of commercial, 3D dental printable resins for their acrylate or methacrylate content, and to relate that knowledge to the intended use of the printed item: extraorally or intraorally.
  • EFFECT OF TIP-TO-TARGET DISTANCE ON IRRADIANCE AMONG A VARIETY OF LED LIGHTS

    Klein, Laura; Rueggeberg, FA; Department of Restorative Sciences (Augusta University, 2019)
    Purpose of this research: To measure and compare (1) tip-to-target distance irradiance profiles (2) tip-to-target distance at which irradiance has dropped to 50% of 0-mm value (3) irradiance value at the 50% distance.
  • Aesthetic improvement of a smile using minimal intervention procedures. A case report

    Cowan, Marcus; Babb, C; Romero, M; Pruett, M; Coleman, J; Department of Restorative Sciences (Augusta University, 2019)
    Tooth discoloration, particularly affecting the maxillary anterior teeth, is often an esthetic concern for dental patients.1 The most common cause of intrinsic tooth discoloration is dental fluorosis (DF),1 which is enamel hypomineralization due to long-term ingestion of high levels of fluoride during tooth mineralization.2 DF results in white opaque areas or discolorations ranging from yellow to dark brown, with porosities on the enamel surface.3 A widely-used scale for classifying the severity of DF is the Tooth Surface Index of Fluorosis (TSIF), developed by Horowitz, by which the examiner determines the extent of affected enamel by estimating the amount of DF as a fraction of the total visible enamel surface.4 Microabrasion, introduced by Croll and Cavanaugh in 1986,5 is a technique used to correct surface enamel irregularities and remove intrinsic enamel stains through the application of hydrochloric acid combined with pumice in a paste.6 When performed correctly and conservatively, the amount of enamel loss from microabrasion is clincally insignificant.7 The success of microabrasion depends upon the extent and severity of the discoloration, and occasionally a slightly yellowish appearance will result from the yellow dentin shade showing through the translucent enamel.8 The final appearance can be improved by dental bleaching, with long-lasting results.7 The following article is a clinical report of the use of microabrasion combined with nightguard bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide to improve the appearance of teeth affected by fluorosis.
  • PHOTOINITIATOR TYPES AMONG A VARIETY OF 3D PRINTING MONOMERS

    Bowerman, Brielle; Rueggeberg, FA; Brenes, C; Department of Restorative Sciences, Department of General Dentistry (Augusta University Libraries, 2019)
    A variety of manufacturing techniques have been used throughout the history of dentistry, in order to fabricate indirect restorations. Formative processes (pouring or pressing items into molds) are used when making conventional dentures, or when pressing ceramics. Recently, subtractive fabrication methods have enabled clinicians to mill a wide variety of ceramic and resin-based blanks directly into final forms, fitting the oral structures with high degrees of precision. Examples of older additive techniques include wax buildups to establish missing tooth structure for fabrication of subsequent cast restorations and the manual layering of powdered porcelains for development of ceramic facings on metallic substrates, or for ceramic veneers themselves. Tremendous advancements have been made in the field of 3D digital printing for many industrially based applications. Advances in research and development have resulted in tabletop 3D printers that produce rapid prototype specimens having very high accuracy and surface feature details. Recently, these advances have resulted in the manufacture and availability of a wide variety of 3D digital printers that dental offices now use to directly fabricate a wide range of restorative appliances (denture bases and teeth, temporary restorations, splints) as well as ancillary devices (impression trays, surgical implant guides, casts, try-in set-ups, and stents). Contemporary dental 3D printing typically involves use of near or true ultraviolet radiation (405 nm & 385 nm, respectively) in order to fabricate the basic desired form from a vat of photo-polymerizable monomers. Subsequent to initial form fabrication, the specimen is alcohol-washed of excess surface monomer, and is then subjected to an additional exposure of strong near/UV light, in order to maximize the polymerization process and provide optimal physical properties, as well as to minimize cytotoxicity resulting from leaching of unreacted, residual monomer within the bulk of the as-printed item.