• ACRYLATE/METHACRYLATE CONTENT AMONG A VARIETY OF 3D PRINTING RESINS

      Walker, Dylan; Villalobos, V; Rueggeberg, FA; Brenes, C; Department of Restorative Sciences, Department of General Dentistry (Augusta University, 2019)
      The purposes of this research were to apply an infrared spectroscopic analytical method to differentiate among a variety of commercial, 3D dental printable resins for their acrylate or methacrylate content, and to relate that knowledge to the intended use of the printed item: extraorally or intraorally.
    • EFFECT OF PRINT ANGULATION, MODEL RESIN, AND PRINTER ON DIMENSIONAL ACCURACY OF 3D PRINTED MODELS

      Fantaski, Lincoln; Mettenburg, D; Brenes, C; Rueggeberg, FA; Department of Restorative Sciences, Department of General Dentistry (Augusta University, 2019)
      Recent advances in the application of digital imaging of oral tissues and three-dimensional, additive fabrication techniques have led to a burgeoning industry in dentistry. Over a very short period of time, this technology has greatly improved in terms of level of surface detail reproducibility and dimensional accuracy of printed forms. Initially, thermoplastic extrusion of warmed filaments of various plastic material was used. However, the layer thickness was quite large, and surface feature reproduction was low. With advances in use of photocurable monomer resins and controlled application of photo-activating light wavelengths to provide polymerization of very thin slices of the form image, the reality of providing stoneless models of a patient’s dentition became a physical, and financial reality in private dental practices.
    • A multidisciplinary approach to the management of a maxillary midline diastema: A clinical report

      Romero, Mario F.; Babb, C; Department of Restorative Sciences, Department of General Dentistry (Augusta University, 2019)
      Anterior maxillary spacing has been shown to be one of the most negative influences on self-perceived dental appearance, and a maxillary midline diastema (MMD) is commonly cited by patients as a primary concern during dental consultations. MMD has been defined as a space greater than 0.5 mm between the mesial surfaces of the 2 maxillary central incisors. An MMD greater than 2 mm in the mixed dentition is unlikely to spontaneously close. African Americans are more than twice as likely to have an MMD than whites or Hispanics. In esthetic situations, without a comprehensive smile analysis and proper planning, overtreatment and undesirable effects can occur. Tooth size especially has been emphasized as the primary element of an esthetic smile design. One method of establishing tooth size is tooth biometry as described by Chu. He reported that maxillary anterior tooth widths average 8.5 mm for central incisors, 6.5 mm for lateral incisors, and 7.5 mm for canines and that 80% of the patient population falls within ±0.5 mm of these values. Other important elements of smile analysis include the dental midline, tooth morphology, axial inclinations, and the soft tissue components of gingival health, levels, and harmony. The direct bonding technique is a straightforward, conservative method for diastema closure. However, artistic skills, a knowledge of tooth morphology, and the appropriate selection and use of composite resin materials are essential for success. According to Spear and Kokich, “some existing dentitions simply cannot be restored to a more pleasing appearance without the assistance of several different dental disciplines.” Therefore, complex esthetic dilemmas may require more than one dental discipline, for example, operative dentistry and orthodontics, to establish a functional, maintainable, and pleasant smile. This article illustrates a clinical situation in which an MMD was addressed by first completing a comprehensive smile analysis, followed by closure using limited orthodontics and direct composite resin restorations.