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dc.contributor.authorConnor, Linda
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-29T01:15:22Z
dc.date.available2019-04-29T01:15:22Z
dc.date.issued1986-05
dc.identifier.urien
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622286
dc.description.abstractThe purpose 9f this study was to determine the_relationship between self-esteem and l~adership effectiveness among selected nursing leaders. The principal research.question:was:. What is the relationship between self-esteem and 1_ eadershi p effectiveness among· selected nurse administrators? Subjects selected for inclusion in the study were a convenience sampla of 43 administ~ative personnel: Assistant Directors, Supervisors, and H_ead Nurses from three genera-l , acute care hospi ta 1 s in a southeast metropolitan area. This convenience sample was selected because data were available on their leadership effectiveness as perceived by self and one or more· subordinates.· These data were obtained· through the administration of the Leader Effectiveness and Adaptability Description-Self and Other {_LEAD-Self and LEAD-Other} Tool: developed by Hersey and Blanchard. The comBined self and other scores for leadership effectiveness were used as the dependent variable. To obtain self-esteem scores, the Texas Social Behavi9r Inventory (TSBI) developed by Helmreich, Stapp, and Ervin, was administered to the 43 eligible subjects. Thirty-one usable returns were obtained from respondents who thus constituted the sample population. The self-esteem scores obtained from the TSB I were used as the independent var1'ab 1 e. Analy~is of data was conducted. using Pearson product moment coefficients to compute correlations betwe~n self-esteem and leadership v effectiveness. Correlations indicated no systematic relatiqnship between self-esteem and leadership effectiveness as perceived 5y self and others . . in the study sample. Additional findings suggested tflat ther:e was no correlation between self~esteem and self-perceived leadership effect i vene.ss; that nurse 1 eaders' views of their own 1 eadershi p effectiveness did not correlate with·the views of their subordinates; and that there was no relationship between leader self-estee~ and leadership ·effectiveness as perceived by others. These findings suggest that one's rea 1 1 eadershi p effectiveness is somewhere between the 1 eaders •· perceptions of their effectiveness and the followers' perceptions of their leaders' effectiveness.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en_US
dc.subjectHead Nurseen_US
dc.subjectNurse Administratorsen_US
dc.subjectperceptionen_US
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnairesen_US
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Self-Esteem and Leadership Effectiveness in Nursingen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Nursingen_US
dc.description.advisorN/Aen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Arts in Nursingen_US
dc.description.committeeLowernstein, Arlene Monnig, Regina McCraine, Edward Echols, Jane Lynneen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-29T01:15:22Z


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