• Opioid Crisis Trends in Georgia: Using Data Management Systems to Better Inform Public Policy

      Sheikh, Nafiz; Tauhidul, Liniya; Medical College of Georgia
      Introduction: The nationwide opioid epidemic is arguably the most consequential public health crisis of the new millennium. Unfortunately, a dearth of medical literature exists analyzing the scope of the epidemic in Georgia. This presentation will investigate trends in fatal opioid overdoses in Georgia using a robust healthcare data management system: Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) WONDER. Methods: Using CDC WONDER, a cohort of all fatal opioid overdoses in Georgia from 1999 – 2017 was obtained (N=10,070). The group was then stratified by race, sex, age group, and overdosed opioid type. Time series analyses were used to determine trends, two-sided Chi-square tests with statistical significance set to p<0.05 used to compare opioid mortality proportions from different years and mortalities between age groups. Lastly findings were correlated to geography to ascertain if urbanization correlated to opioid mortality. Results: Approximately 1056 fatal opioid overdoses occurred in 2017, up 192% from 550 deaths in 2010. Fatal overdoses from heroin and synthetic accounted for only 2% and 17% of total deaths in 2010 but magnified to 20% and 32% by 2017 (p<0.05). Beginning 2013, heroin and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl together drove Georgia opioid mortality sharply higher. Among different age groups, Georgians aged 25-34yrs experienced the highest mortalities compared to other females within the same age group (p<0.05) and to males and female in the 35-44yrs and 45-54yrs groups (p<0.05). Correlating fatalities to geography found urban areas in Atlanta, Augusta, and Columbus to have the highest mortality rates. Conclusion: Georgians have experienced an unprecedented surge in mortality from opioid-related overdoses in recent years. With robust healthcare data management systems, however, new research endeavors are poised to generate more thorough epidemiological reports that will better inform local and state health policy.
    • Organizing, Describing, and Sharing Research Data

      Marshall, Brianna; UCR Library, University of California, Riverside
    • Organizing, Describing, and Sharing Research Data: A Handout

      Marshall, Brianna; UCR Library, University of California, Riverside
    • SF12v2 Health Scores for African Americans in a Cluster-randomized Community Trial

      Joshua, Thomas V.; Gavin, Jane T.; Marion, Lucy; Williams, Lovoria B.; College of Nursing
    • Time Cost of Standard Nursing Screens

      Migdal, Victoria; Harper, Katie; Haqqani, Nazish; Janiak, Bruce; Department of Emergency Medicine
      Purpose: To determine the time to obtain answers to five-preselected ED nursing triage/assessment questions and convert this time to the monetary cost to the emergency department. Methods: A prospective observational study of ED Registered Nurses performing triage assessments on 200 adults presenting to the ED for medical care. During the triage assessment, the nurse was timed by one of the study authors while the RN asked five pre-selected questions included in their current triage protocol. The time cost of each question was determined by multiplying the time spent asking the question each year by the average hourly wage of our ED RNs. (T x V x S)/3600; where T= average time per question (in seconds), V=annual patient volume, S=average hourly RN wage Results: A total of 200 triage assessments were observed. During these assessments, 130 patients were asked about pneumococcal vaccine status, 161 asked about tetanus vaccine status, 184 asked about medication allergies, 172 about influenza vaccine, and 73 about recent travel. The average time spent per question ranged from 4.4-6.3 seconds. The estimated annual time used to ask these 5 questions in the AUMC ED is 633.98 hrs, which equates to $22189.3 in nursing costs per year. Conclusions: This is a cursory look at the potential monetary and time costs of standardized screening questions in the ED. These values directly affect time and cost efficiency in the ED process and could potentially be redirected to more pertinent patient care. The required screening questions are often unrelated to the patient’s chief complaint and have no impact on the medical management in the ED. Further studies are needed to determine cost effectiveness of required ED screenings.
    • Trends in Research Data Management

      Nurnberger, Amy; Massachusetts Institute of Technology