• AU IT Data Management Services and Challenges

      Buenger, Anthony; Information Technology at Augusta University
    • Data Repositories For Research Reproducibility

      Davies, Kathy J; Putnam Davis, Jennifer; University Libraries
    • Data Repositories for Research Reproducibility: A Handout

      Putnam Davis, Jennifer; University Libraries
    • Georgia Cancer Center Integrated Genomics Resource & HPC Server

      Chang, Chang-Shen (Sam); Georgia Cancer Center
      Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University is home to a High Performance Computing (HPC) Server. One goal of the HPC server is to host the new Biorepository software, LabVantage. This software is a web-based laboratory information management system, which tracks samples throughout their lifespan. All specimens that the Georgia Cancer Center Biorepository receives is entered into LabVantage, which generates a unique barcode number for each sample. Chain of custody is recorded throughout the sample’s lifespan, from inception to eventual withdrawal. LabVantage organizes data such as patient demographics, diagnosis, organ site, and linked pathology reports. 
LabVantage is compliant with all regulations relevant to patient privacy and satisfies all regulations set forth by The College of American Pathologists (CAP). All Biorepository personnel are trained to maintain confidentiality of patient information according to HIPAA regulations. The HPC Server is also used for the analysis of complex data including Next-Generation Sequencing data (NGS). It is currently used to perform data analysis on datasets such as those obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The analyses that used to take several weeks can now be performed in a matter of days. Georgia Cancer Center HPC Server is composed of 544 total compute cores and an aggregated memory of 2.9TB. The system is composed of (15) PowerEdge R430 1U systems (128 GB RAM each), (1) PowerEdge R830 (1024 GB RAM) and a high-speed 10GbE interconnect for intra-node communication. The HPCC also houses 633 TB RAW storage capacity. We will also be integrating existing Cancer Center servers including our Illumina Compute system that collects data directly from the Sequencer housed in the Georgia Cancer Center Integrated Genomics Shared Resource and the existing Bioinformatics HPC (see configuration diagram below). Access to the server is available to all Augusta University employees. There is a nominal fee associated with usage and users are required to undergo training.
    • Non-invasive Biomarkers to Detect Acute Kidney Injury in Premature Infants

      Marin, Terri; Williams, Bryan; Bhatia, Jatinda; Sharma, Ashok; Mundy, Cynthia; Cockfield, Christy; College of Nursing; Department of Pediatrics: Neonatology; Department of Population Health Science; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; et al.
    • NOTES ON DATA + INFORMATION DESIGN

      Goodson Rubio, Holly; Institutional Effectiveness
    • SF12v2 Health Scores for African Americans in a Cluster-randomized Community Trial

      Joshua, Thomas V.; Gavin, Jane T.; Marion, Lucy; Williams, Lovoria B.; College of Nursing
    • Time Cost of Standard Nursing Screens

      Migdal, Victoria; Harper, Katie; Haqqani, Nazish; Janiak, Bruce; Department of Emergency Medicine
      Purpose: To determine the time to obtain answers to five-preselected ED nursing triage/assessment questions and convert this time to the monetary cost to the emergency department. Methods: A prospective observational study of ED Registered Nurses performing triage assessments on 200 adults presenting to the ED for medical care. During the triage assessment, the nurse was timed by one of the study authors while the RN asked five pre-selected questions included in their current triage protocol. The time cost of each question was determined by multiplying the time spent asking the question each year by the average hourly wage of our ED RNs. (T x V x S)/3600; where T= average time per question (in seconds), V=annual patient volume, S=average hourly RN wage Results: A total of 200 triage assessments were observed. During these assessments, 130 patients were asked about pneumococcal vaccine status, 161 asked about tetanus vaccine status, 184 asked about medication allergies, 172 about influenza vaccine, and 73 about recent travel. The average time spent per question ranged from 4.4-6.3 seconds. The estimated annual time used to ask these 5 questions in the AUMC ED is 633.98 hrs, which equates to $22189.3 in nursing costs per year. Conclusions: This is a cursory look at the potential monetary and time costs of standardized screening questions in the ED. These values directly affect time and cost efficiency in the ED process and could potentially be redirected to more pertinent patient care. The required screening questions are often unrelated to the patient’s chief complaint and have no impact on the medical management in the ED. Further studies are needed to determine cost effectiveness of required ED screenings.
    • Trends in Research Data Management

      Nurnberger, Amy; Massachusetts Institute of Technology