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dc.contributor.authorO'Bryant, Sinead
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T20:07:19Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T20:07:19Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622133
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 20th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractAccording to epidemiological data, healthy premenopausal women exhibit greater protection from cardiovascular disease (CVD) when compared to men of a similar age. �It has been hypothesized that estrogen, one of the primary female sex hormones, is responsible for this protection. Previous studies have shown that the nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide-(NAD+)-dependent histone-deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) provides protection from hyperglycemia, metabolic and endothelial dysfunction, all which contribute to CVD development. �The aim of this analysis was to show the potential relationship between circulating endogenous estrogen and SIRT1 in premenopausal women and its association with HbA1c, an indicator of glycemic state.� By utilizing the menstrual cycle, when estrogen is at its highest range during the follicular phase and at its lowest during meneses, the effects based on circulating estrogen on SIRT1 concentrations were evaluated in women by ELISA of participant blood plasma. �The results show SIRT1 and circulating estrogen have a significant positive correlation, and SIRT1 and HbA1c have a trending negative correlation. It was also seen that SIRT1 concentrations were found to be protected against high HbAlc levels when endogenous estrogen was high, providing evidence that circulating estrogen may act as a mediator of SIRT1, functioning as a protective mechanism from CVD in premenopausal women.
dc.subjectEstrogenen
dc.subjectSIRT1en
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF CIRCULATING ESTROGEN ON SIRT1 LEVELS IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMENen
dc.typePoster Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
dc.contributor.sponsorHarris, Ryanen
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
html.description.abstractAccording to epidemiological data, healthy premenopausal women exhibit greater protection from cardiovascular disease (CVD) when compared to men of a similar age. �It has been hypothesized that estrogen, one of the primary female sex hormones, is responsible for this protection. Previous studies have shown that the nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide-(NAD+)-dependent histone-deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) provides protection from hyperglycemia, metabolic and endothelial dysfunction, all which contribute to CVD development. �The aim of this analysis was to show the potential relationship between circulating endogenous estrogen and SIRT1 in premenopausal women and its association with HbA1c, an indicator of glycemic state.� By utilizing the menstrual cycle, when estrogen is at its highest range during the follicular phase and at its lowest during meneses, the effects based on circulating estrogen on SIRT1 concentrations were evaluated in women by ELISA of participant blood plasma. �The results show SIRT1 and circulating estrogen have a significant positive correlation, and SIRT1 and HbA1c have a trending negative correlation. It was also seen that SIRT1 concentrations were found to be protected against high HbAlc levels when endogenous estrogen was high, providing evidence that circulating estrogen may act as a mediator of SIRT1, functioning as a protective mechanism from CVD in premenopausal women.


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