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dc.contributor.authorHammond, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorWyman, Kailey
dc.contributor.authorBlair, Gregory
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T20:07:18Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T20:07:18Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622108
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 20th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractSince the 1990�s, scientists have been attempting to make chemical synthesis procedures more environmentally friendly.� One area of environmental concern is the amount of electricity required to provide enough energy to complete an experiment. Recently proposed solar reflectors developed from satellite dishes have the ability to be incorporated into student laboratory procedures to eliminate electricity use while demonstrating green chemistry techniques at the same time. As a result, demand to incorporate more green chemistry techniques into student laboratories has increased. An effective means for minimizing the amount of electricity needed to drive chemical reactions to completion is proposed through the use of solar parabolic reflectors. A comparative study was conducted using an electrical and solar heat source on the Williamson Ether synthesis of 2-butoxynaphthalene. This reaction was chosen as the test reaction due to its widespread use among many undergraduate chemistry programs.
dc.titleWILLIAMSON ETHER REACTION USING A SOLAR HEAT SOURCE DESIGNED FOR UNDERGRADUATE CHEMISTRY LABORATORIESen
dc.typePoster Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Chemistry and Physicsen
cr.funding.sourceNo funding was received for this project.en
dc.contributor.sponsorAgee, Brianen
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
html.description.abstractSince the 1990�s, scientists have been attempting to make chemical synthesis procedures more environmentally friendly.� One area of environmental concern is the amount of electricity required to provide enough energy to complete an experiment. Recently proposed solar reflectors developed from satellite dishes have the ability to be incorporated into student laboratory procedures to eliminate electricity use while demonstrating green chemistry techniques at the same time. As a result, demand to incorporate more green chemistry techniques into student laboratories has increased. An effective means for minimizing the amount of electricity needed to drive chemical reactions to completion is proposed through the use of solar parabolic reflectors. A comparative study was conducted using an electrical and solar heat source on the Williamson Ether synthesis of 2-butoxynaphthalene. This reaction was chosen as the test reaction due to its widespread use among many undergraduate chemistry programs.


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