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dc.contributor.authorMiles, Edgar*
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T20:06:56Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T20:06:56Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622102
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 20th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstract�That�s On You, Not Me� is a performance piece that was created in response to an assignment prompt for Dr. Melanie O�Meara�s Voice and Movement class in Spring 2018. The assignment was to write a haiku and perform that haiku using at least 12 individual vocal variations. Gender expression and the ways alternative expressions are received in various social contexts are existing themes in my visual art practice, so I decided to continue that exploration in my performance work for Dr. O�Meara�s class. In doing so, my performance addresses the discomfort that people experience when faced with expression that violates their expectations and whose responsibility it is to mitigate that discomfort. I present to the audience twelve individual characters created through vocal and movement variation. My intention is to open conversations about gender norms, societal expectations, the experience of �othering,� and respect for individual expression. The performance itself lasts only about three minutes, but can be followed by a brief talk about the work and a question-and-answer session.
dc.subjecttheateren
dc.subjectperformanceen
dc.subjectgenderen
dc.titleThat's On You, Not Meen
dc.typeOral Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Communicationen
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
dc.contributor.sponsorO'Meara, Melanieen
html.description.abstract�That�s On You, Not Me� is a performance piece that was created in response to an assignment prompt for Dr. Melanie O�Meara�s Voice and Movement class in Spring 2018. The assignment was to write a haiku and perform that haiku using at least 12 individual vocal variations. Gender expression and the ways alternative expressions are received in various social contexts are existing themes in my visual art practice, so I decided to continue that exploration in my performance work for Dr. O�Meara�s class. In doing so, my performance addresses the discomfort that people experience when faced with expression that violates their expectations and whose responsibility it is to mitigate that discomfort. I present to the audience twelve individual characters created through vocal and movement variation. My intention is to open conversations about gender norms, societal expectations, the experience of �othering,� and respect for individual expression. The performance itself lasts only about three minutes, but can be followed by a brief talk about the work and a question-and-answer session.


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