Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLee, Divesia
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T20:06:39Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T20:06:39Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622097
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 20th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractSocial determinants of health account for about 50 percent of health outcomes- more than any other category, yet is the most understudied, therefore warranting further investigation. We contend that within social determinants of health, analysis of racial segregation is of importance. Racial segregation is a structural form of racism, where people of similar race live in communities apart from people of other races. Prior studies have used a dissimilarity index to measure racial segregation and its impact on health outcomes, and has suggested that racial residential segregation has a negative impact on health outcomes, but none of these studies have focused on county level data or the State of Georgia in particular. Using a dataset from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supplemented by other public health and demographic data for all counties in Georgia, we use regression analysis to model the relationship between segregation and various health outcomes. A variety of social determinants of health were analyzed ranging from factors of economic stability, neighborhood and physical environment, and education, to aspects of the healthcare system. Initial results suggest that racial segregation relates to health outcomes, but it depends on the health outcomes being measured. Conclusions are pending further quantitative analysis.
dc.subjectRacial Segregationen
dc.subjectHealth Outcomesen
dc.subjectGeorgiaen
dc.titleRacial Dissimilarities as a Social Determinant of Health Outcomes: Evidence from Counties in the State of Georgiaen
dc.typeOral Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentHull College of Businessen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of English & Foreign Languagesen
dc.contributor.sponsorMedcalfe, Simonen
dc.contributor.sponsorSlade, Catherineen
dc.contributor.sponsorHoffman, Todden
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
html.description.abstractSocial determinants of health account for about 50 percent of health outcomes- more than any other category, yet is the most understudied, therefore warranting further investigation. We contend that within social determinants of health, analysis of racial segregation is of importance. Racial segregation is a structural form of racism, where people of similar race live in communities apart from people of other races. Prior studies have used a dissimilarity index to measure racial segregation and its impact on health outcomes, and has suggested that racial residential segregation has a negative impact on health outcomes, but none of these studies have focused on county level data or the State of Georgia in particular. Using a dataset from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supplemented by other public health and demographic data for all counties in Georgia, we use regression analysis to model the relationship between segregation and various health outcomes. A variety of social determinants of health were analyzed ranging from factors of economic stability, neighborhood and physical environment, and education, to aspects of the healthcare system. Initial results suggest that racial segregation relates to health outcomes, but it depends on the health outcomes being measured. Conclusions are pending further quantitative analysis.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record