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dc.contributor.authorOverlie, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T20:00:10Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T20:00:10Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622085
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 20th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractControlled generation of micron and sub-micron sized drops continues to be of strong interest for the scientific community due to the variety of applications in fields like cosmetics, food industry, and drug delivery among others. By flowing two immiscible liquids into a glass-based microfluidic device, we can make emulsion drops with a minimum size of the order of the tip size. Adding an external electric field, similarly to what it is done in the classical electrospray, allows the generation of droplets with sizes below the smallest geometrical characteristic of the device. In this work, we are focused on the region of small flow rates. There is a minimum flow rate below which a cone-jet cannot be formed regardless of the applied voltage. This limit marks the minimum drop size that could be generated. We study pairs of liquids with different viscosities and conductivities using high speed microscopy and current measurements. With these data we will try to understand this limit and the characteristics of the modes observed in this region.
dc.subjectemulsionen
dc.subjectelectrified jetsen
dc.subjectdropsen
dc.titleExploring the minimum flow rate limit in electro co-flowen
dc.typeOral Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Chemistry & Physicsen
cr.funding.sourceAugusta University CURS Student Research Granten
dc.contributor.sponsorMillan, Josefa Guerreroen
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
html.description.abstractControlled generation of micron and sub-micron sized drops continues to be of strong interest for the scientific community due to the variety of applications in fields like cosmetics, food industry, and drug delivery among others. By flowing two immiscible liquids into a glass-based microfluidic device, we can make emulsion drops with a minimum size of the order of the tip size. Adding an external electric field, similarly to what it is done in the classical electrospray, allows the generation of droplets with sizes below the smallest geometrical characteristic of the device. In this work, we are focused on the region of small flow rates. There is a minimum flow rate below which a cone-jet cannot be formed regardless of the applied voltage. This limit marks the minimum drop size that could be generated. We study pairs of liquids with different viscosities and conductivities using high speed microscopy and current measurements. With these data we will try to understand this limit and the characteristics of the modes observed in this region.


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