• Concentrations of Iron, Copper, Nickel, and Zinc in Rae's Creek

      Bridgers, Aerial; Department of Chemistry & Physics; Augusta University; Klug, Christopher (2019-02-13)
      Heavy metals can enter water systems through a variety of methods, such as through soil run-off, rain, or industrial activity near the system. Many of these heavy metals are toxic to both the wildlife and people around the system if present in high enough concentrations. The aim of this research was to create a model for a local water system, Rae's Creek, outlining the concentrations of iron, copper, nickel, and zinc present throughout a seven-month period. Additionally, this research sought to pinpoint any correlation between increases in metal concentrations and outside events, such as rain or the Master's Tournament held yearly in Augusta. Results indicated that copper and zinc concentrations were well above guidelines set for recreational water quality by the Environmental Protection Agency, while iron and nickel concentrations were generally below the limitations set for their concentrations. While rain had no observed effect on the heavy metal concentrations, there are two specific dates where all four metals had a marked increase in concentration. However, it is inconclusive as to what caused this increase.
    • Design and Manufacture of Low-Cost Real-Time Feedback CPR Manikin

      Sangari, Anish; Sood, Nitish; Department of Chemistry & Physics; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
      Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is a life-saving technique used when a person stops breathing or a heart stops beating. Immediate CPR can double or triple survival rates after cardiac arrest. While many CPR training courses use non-electronic CPR manikins, recent literature has shown that training on a real-time feedback CPR manikin improves functional outcomes such as chest compression rate and mean tidal volume. However, current commercially available real-time feedback manikins either only measure metrics on chest compressions or are available at very high prices, making training a class on such manikins infeasible. Accordingly, we have designed, constructed, and tested a low-cost Arduino microcontroller-based CPR manikin that provides real-time feedback to trainees on critical metrics including force of compressions, rate of compressions, hands-off time, percentage of full chest recoils, angle of neck tilt, and other steps in ventilations. Visual and auditory feedback on these metrics is delivered to trainees, allowing them to adjust their performance in real time. Additionally, data from each training session is saved and assigned to a user profile, so that multiple trainees can review their progress throughout their training. Future research will be conducted on the efficacy of training on this manikin compared to commercially available manikins.
    • Exact diagonalization RIXS studies of the doped 1d t1-t2-J model at the O K-edge

      Price, Gregory; Department of Chemistry & Physics; Augusta University; Datta, Trinanjan (2019-02-13)
      Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a novel spectroscopic method for probing charge and spin excitations in quantum magnets. In one dimension, where quantum fluctuations are most prominent, a system of interacting electrons can support fractionalized spinless charge excitations (holons) and chargeless spin excitation (spinons). Currently, X-ray spectroscopic techniques such as RIXS can excite the O K-edge core electrons of correlated quantum magnets to probe the physical nature of the above mentioned spin-charge separated state. Using exact diagonalization we investigate the O K-edge RIXS response of the one dimensional antiferromagnetic spin chain compound with nearest and next-nearest neighbor hoppings. We also study the spin-anisotropic version of the same model. Interaction of the core electrons with the X-rays generate multi-spinon excitations in the RIXS spectrum, for example in strontium copper oxide. We find that the RIXS spectrum of the t1-t2-J model with spin anisotropy presents a rich source of physical information, including allowing us to identify microscopic pathways for how the quantum spin fluctuations control the appearance of the four spinon excitations observed in the isotropic O K-edge spectrum.
    • Exploring the minimum flow rate limit in electro co-flow

      Overlie, Benjamin; Department of Biological Sciences; Department of Chemistry & Physics; Augusta University; Millan, Josefa Guerrero (2019-02-13)
      Controlled generation of micron and sub-micron sized drops continues to be of strong interest for the scientific community due to the variety of applications in fields like cosmetics, food industry, and drug delivery among others. By flowing two immiscible liquids into a glass-based microfluidic device, we can make emulsion drops with a minimum size of the order of the tip size. Adding an external electric field, similarly to what it is done in the classical electrospray, allows the generation of droplets with sizes below the smallest geometrical characteristic of the device. In this work, we are focused on the region of small flow rates. There is a minimum flow rate below which a cone-jet cannot be formed regardless of the applied voltage. This limit marks the minimum drop size that could be generated. We study pairs of liquids with different viscosities and conductivities using high speed microscopy and current measurements. With these data we will try to understand this limit and the characteristics of the modes observed in this region.
    • Transport properties in Graphene Bilayer

      Trowel, Alonte; Department of Chemistry & Physics; Augusta University; Datta, Trinanjan (2019-02-13)
      Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal pattern. It has many potential technological applications and provides a testbed to verify fundamental concepts in physics. Using quantum mechanical transmission and reflection amplitudes we study the transport properties of bilayer graphene. For the parameter range that We explored we find that the transmission probability is controlled by the applied bias. We also outline how this approach can be utilized to study oligomers and oligoacenes.