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dc.contributor.authorWingate, Montrel
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-30T20:59:05Z
dc.date.available2019-01-30T20:59:05Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622057
dc.descriptionThis file is restricted to Augusta University. Please log in using your JagNet ID and password to access.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis focuses on the relationship of music and law. Throughout, the debated question is: should the laws of copyright be redefined? The case Williams v. Bridgeport Music, Inc., which focuses on the songs "Blurred Lines" by Robin Thicke and "Got to Give It Up" by Marvin Gaye is the trial central to this thesis. Following a brief history of sampling, Williams v. Bridgeport Music, Inc. is reexamined, challenging the substantiality of the evidence presented. The court proved that the songs have similarities on the surface, yet there is a notable structural difference among the songs. A proposed solution is given, advocating a revision of copyright laws and a substantive similarity test with emphasis on the expert listener rather than the lay listener.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAugusta Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en_US
dc.titleBlurred Lines within the Music Industry: A Different Perspective ofCopyright Law and Sampling in the Digital Ageen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of History, Anthropology, & Philosophyen_US


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