Recent Submissions

  • Psychosocial Factors as Predictors for Patient Outcomes in Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Injury Caused by Trauma:

    Holley, Ashlyn; Saren, Madison; Wygle, Sarah; Deese, Abigail; Payne, Regan; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-26)
    At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will be able to: 1) Explain three ways in which psychosocial factors have the ability to alter rehabilitation outcomes in individuals who have sustained a traumatic upper extremity injury, 2) Discuss two gaps in the literature regarding the impact of psychosocial factors on rehabilitation outcomes in individuals recovering from traumatic upper extremity injuries, 3) Identify two methods, strategies, or assessments to be implemented in practice in order to evaluate and address psychosocial factors as a component affecting functional outcomes of clients with traumatic UE injuries.
  • Telehealth Interventions to Address Chronic Disease Self-Management Interventions within the Scope of Occupational Therapy: A Scoping Review

    Albritton, Liz; Fish, joJo; Henkel, Jeff; Lee, Shelby; Luttrel, Rachel; Rackleff, Layne; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-09-02)
    At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: 1) Distinguish between the types of telehealth interventions for chronic disease self-management within the scope of occupational therapy and 2) Describe the outcomes of using telehealth for chronic disease self-management based on the presented results of a scoping review of the literature.
  • The Effects of Interprofessional Education on Occupational Therapy Student Practitioner Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    Adams, Emma; Carlto, Meg; Kali, Todd; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-09-01)
    Objectives of Presentation: 1) Understand and communicate the effects that various evidence based interprofessional education interventions have on occupational therapy student outcomes. and 2) Discuss the gaps in the literature, indicated by this systematic review, as they relate to interprofessional education and its effects.
  • Benefits of International Fieldwork for Occupational Therapy Students

    Vickman, Hannah; Carter, Krissy; Dittmer, Chandler; Nettles, Taylor; Wang, Caroline; McCarley, Trinity; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-09-01)
    At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: 1) Identify the perceived benefits for international fieldwork ascertained from the research and how that relates to professional and personal development, and 2) Identify the key clinical experience differences between OT students participating in international and domestic fieldwork, as established from the presented research.
  • Evidence supporting interventions within the scope of occupational therapy for addressing

    Arnold, Jackie; Cyr, Emily; Garner, Kathryn; Long, Tori; Robles, Alexis; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-26)
    At the conclusion of this presentation, attendees will: a) List three effective interventions to address cognitive and psychological factors in chronic pain based on the presented scoping review of the literature, and b) Articulate the importance of cognitive/psychosocial factors in relation to chronic pain.
  • Outcomes of Music, Dance, & Movement Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Within the Scope of Occupational Therapy: Scoping Review

    Bankson, Baylee; Cox, Ashlyn; Fulmer, Haley; Hausman, Lydia; Longfellow, Danielle; Department of Occupational Therapy (Augusta University, 2020-08-31)
    At the conclusion of this, attendees will: 1) Identify frequently measured outcomes of using music, dance, and movement-based interventions with individuals with autism spectrum disorder, as identified through a scoping review of the literature and 2) List specific music, dance, or movement-based interventions that are available to OT practitioners working with individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as identified through a scoping review of the literature.
  • Enabling Assessments to Better Inform Goal Setting and Treatment Planning for Patients with Elbow, Wrist, and Hand Impairments

    Hughes, Jason; Department of Occupational Therapy (11/7/2018)
    Musculoskeletal disorders, including elbow, wrist, and hand impairments, are the second most common disability worldwide and place a large burden on the health care system. Due to this prevalence and cost, accurate and precise assessment is critical to ensure that patient treatment is optimal (i.e. efficient and productive). Our first objective was to examine the item-level characteristics of the Elbow, Wrist, and Hand Computer Adaptive Test (EWH CAT) using Rasch analysis, including item difficulty measures, person ability measures, item fit, and item-person match. A unique feature of Rasch analysis is its ability to plot person ability and item difficulty on the same continuum. Awareness of this relationship helped us discern that while our items matched our sample relatively well (i.e. sample mean .13 logits above the item mean) there were slight ceiling and floor effects indicating that the addition of some harder and easier items might increase the breadth of abilities in our sample that could be accurately measured. After identifying the item-level properties of the EWH CAT, our second objective was to develop a data collection form to assist clinicians in goal setting and treatment planning. Using the Winsteps Rasch analysis program, a keyform was generated. Based on this keyform, a data collection form was created that could be used to illustrate how patient responses to specific items (i.e. difficulty indicated) differ from admission and discharge, thus helping to guide clinicians in goal setting and treatment planning. Our third objective was to identify factors that increase the probability of favorable outcomes for patients with elbow, wrist, and hand diagnoses. Seven variables were found to be associated with the likelihood of a poorer outcome: being female, having greater than three comorbidities, having a history of surgery, acuity of > 22 days, exercising less than 3 times a week, no medication use, and payer source. Four variables were significantly associated with a greater probability of a good outcome: no history of surgery, no medication use, shorter acuity, and payer source. This knowledge might indicate when a treatment approach different from traditional rehabilitation may be required and/or additional consults may be necessary.