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dc.contributor.authorSarfo, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T22:05:14Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T22:05:14Z
dc.date.issued5/22/2018en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621827
dc.description.abstractApproximately six million adults are diagnosed with heart failure (HF) yearly in the U.S., with one million subsequent hospitalizations. Of these, 25%-30% are readmitted within 30 to 90 days of initial discharge. Little is known about relationships among health literacy (HL), self-care and 30-day hospital readmission status in adult African Americans (AAs) with HF. The primary purpose of this study was to explore relationships among HL, baseline self-care maintenance (BSCM), and 30-day hospital readmission status in adult AAs with HF. Two secondary purposes were to determine whether BSCM mediated the relationship between HL and readmission status and whether there was a moderating effect of age, gender, education, insurance status and perceived social support (PSS), on the relationships of HL with BSCM and readmission status. Using a one-month prospective cohort design, HL, BSCM, PSS, basic conditioning factors, and 30-day readmission status were measured in participants from two large hospitals in the Central Savannah River Area in Georgia. Statistical analyses included logistic regression, Pearson product-moment correlation, chi-square tests of independence, and mediation and moderation analyses. Eighty-nine participants were enrolled in this study. Most participants (71.9%) were male, and their mean age was 53.25 years (Standard Deviation, SD = 12.74; range 25-88 years). Of the 89 participants, 28.1% experienced at least one readmission within 30 days of discharge. The following findings have p values < .05. BSCM varied significantly with HL (X2 = 6.97 (degrees of freedom, df = 2, sample size (N) = 89)). Higher PSS was significantly associated with higher BSCM (r = .29). HL was significantly correlated with age (r = -.62). The influence of age on the relationship between HL and readmission status was significant (b = .005). Elderly patients (> 65 years) scoring high on HL had a higher probability of readmission, and younger patients (< 40 years) scoring low on HL had a higher probability of readmission. Post hoc analysis showed that lower ejection fraction predicted readmissions (odds ratio = 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 - 9.05) after controlling for the other predictors. The findings provide a basis for further research to better understand the impact of HL, self-care maintenance, and other patient characteristics on readmission of AAs with HF.
dc.subjectAfrican American Studiesen
dc.subjectPublic Health Educationen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectHealth care Managementen
dc.titleRelationships among Health Literacy, Self-Care, and Hospital Readmission Status in African American Adults with Heart Failureen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiological and Technological Nursingen
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.date.updated2018-05-22T22:05:15Z
dc.description.advisorZadinsky, Julieen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy with a Major in Nursingen
dc.description.committeeChernecky, Cynthia; Thornton, John; Williams, Lovoria; Yang, Francesen
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-10T12:44:23Z
html.description.abstractApproximately six million adults are diagnosed with heart failure (HF) yearly in the U.S., with one million subsequent hospitalizations. Of these, 25%-30% are readmitted within 30 to 90 days of initial discharge. Little is known about relationships among health literacy (HL), self-care and 30-day hospital readmission status in adult African Americans (AAs) with HF. The primary purpose of this study was to explore relationships among HL, baseline self-care maintenance (BSCM), and 30-day hospital readmission status in adult AAs with HF. Two secondary purposes were to determine whether BSCM mediated the relationship between HL and readmission status and whether there was a moderating effect of age, gender, education, insurance status and perceived social support (PSS), on the relationships of HL with BSCM and readmission status. Using a one-month prospective cohort design, HL, BSCM, PSS, basic conditioning factors, and 30-day readmission status were measured in participants from two large hospitals in the Central Savannah River Area in Georgia. Statistical analyses included logistic regression, Pearson product-moment correlation, chi-square tests of independence, and mediation and moderation analyses. Eighty-nine participants were enrolled in this study. Most participants (71.9%) were male, and their mean age was 53.25 years (Standard Deviation, SD = 12.74; range 25-88 years). Of the 89 participants, 28.1% experienced at least one readmission within 30 days of discharge. The following findings have p values < .05. BSCM varied significantly with HL (X2 = 6.97 (degrees of freedom, df = 2, sample size (N) = 89)). Higher PSS was significantly associated with higher BSCM (r = .29). HL was significantly correlated with age (r = -.62). The influence of age on the relationship between HL and readmission status was significant (b = .005). Elderly patients (> 65 years) scoring high on HL had a higher probability of readmission, and younger patients (< 40 years) scoring low on HL had a higher probability of readmission. Post hoc analysis showed that lower ejection fraction predicted readmissions (odds ratio = 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 - 9.05) after controlling for the other predictors. The findings provide a basis for further research to better understand the impact of HL, self-care maintenance, and other patient characteristics on readmission of AAs with HF.


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