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dc.contributor.authorCauthron, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-02T20:41:54Z
dc.date.available2018-02-02T20:41:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621695
dc.descriptionThis file is restricted to Augusta University. Please log in using your JagNet ID and password to access.en_US
dc.description.abstractHigh blood pressure and high heart rate can increase chances of a variety of diseases. This study looked at the impact of music on blood pressure and heart rate in pre-hypertensive individuals based on changes in their oxytocin levels. We hypothesized that listening to music would result in an increase in oxytocin and therefore a decrease in blood pressure and heart rate. This study involved 16 pre-hypertensive individuals. Hemodynamic measurements and oxytocin counts were obtained in three different experimental conditions: rest (control), stressed and after listening to music. The study results indicated a significant reduction in heart rate after listening to music. There was no significant change in blood pressure after listening to music. The results of this study show that listening to music is associated with higher oxytocin levels.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAugusta Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en_US
dc.titleExploring Music's Effects on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Through Changes in Oxytocin Levelsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Chemistry and Physicsen_US
dc.description.advisorVan Tuyll, Debra


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