• Efficacy of chronic disease self-management among low-income Black males with behavioral health disorders: Pilot study

      Collard, Carol; Robinson-Dooley, Vanessa; Patrick, Frances; Farabaugh, Kayla; Kennesaw State University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
      Background: This study examined the effectiveness of Stanford University’s Chronic Disease Self-management Program (CDSMP) among men living with co-morbidities of chronic physical health disease and behavioral health disorders. Methods: The study was conducted at a community-based, non-profit organization in partnership with a large suburban university. Two pilot studies were completed with the population of interest. Low-income adult males with behavioral health disorders were recruited to participate in the program provided by a local behavioral health agency. Facilitators trained in the CDSMP program administered it at the agency site, and participants attended weekly meetings. Descriptive data collected included health history, demographic information, and assessments of knowledge with the Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale and the Chronic Disease Self-Management Questionnaire created by the Stanford Patient Education Research Center. Due to the small sample size, n=12, the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to evaluate before and after differences in the sample. Results: For the participants, there were increases in overall activity, stretching activities, and equipment activities. Additionally, participants experienced a decrease in the number of days affected by poor physical or mental health. However, there was no significant increase in perceived self-efficacy, a factor in patient confidence and possibly compliance. Limitations included the small sample size, lack of a control group, and convenience sampling. Conclusions: Various aspects of the program were helpful to some participants, but cultural factors made other areas less compatible for this population. A larger study, utilizing a comparison group, could generate data relevant to hypotheses based on these observations. By collecting qualitative data, focus groups could contribute to understanding the experiences and needs of the participants. Development of a curriculum for self-management of chronic disease with a focus on intercultural competence is presently of interest.
    • Evaluation of trends in diabetes care in a patient-centered medical home

      Saucier, Ashley N; McMechan, Danielle; Dahl-Smith, Julie; Duffie, Carla; Hodo, Denise; Andrews, Holly E; Hobbs, Joseph; Augusta University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
      Background: The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a model used in primary care to achieve effective management of chronic diseases. The Augusta University Health Family Medicine Center (AUFMC), a PCMH recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance, has implemented strategies to manage its patient population with diabetes. The present study evaluated the effects of these interventions through trend analysis of selected diabetic core measures by use of a qualified clinical data registry, the Practice Partner Research Network. Methods: For this retrospective study, de-identified data were abstracted for adult patients with diabetes for the period of 2013-2015. Process and outcome measures were determined for selected diabetic core measures, based on the 2015 American Diabetes Association and Physician Quality Reporting System of the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare (CMS). These measures included glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), urine microalbumin (Um), diabetic foot and eye exams, and influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. These values were analyzed by the Cochran-Armitage test for trends over time to determine the proportions of patients at the recommended goals. Results: Over time, there were increasing trends for patients who were at the goals for frequencies of HbA1c, Um, LDL, pneumococcal vaccinations, and diabetic retinal exams (p<0.01). Increasing trends were also evident for patients at goal values for HbA1c, BP, and LDL levels (p<0.01). Decreasing trends were noted, however, in the rate of diabetic foot exams (p<0.01). Conclusions: Since AUFMC achieved PCMH recognition status, efforts to improve the management of patients with diabetes have yielded positive outcomes and valuable lessons. Areas of strength include utilization of the diabetes registry, education by regular providers, tailored use of electronic health records for patient education and physician documentation, and appropriate utilization of all team members. Trend analysis indicated that targeted diabetic interventions contributed to improved outcomes in selected diabetic core measures.
    • Letter to the Editor in response to “STD services delivery arrangements in Georgia county health departments”

      Moore, Kathryn; Terry, Latasha; Allen, Michelle (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
    • TEACH Kitchen: A Chronological Review of Accomplishments

      Chea, Jung Hee; Ansa, Benjamin E.; Smith, Selina A.; Augusta University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
      Background: The Eating and Cooking Healthy (TEACH) Kitchen was founded at the Medical College of Georgia in 2015 as a nutrition-based intervention to combat the high prevalence of obesity and obesity-related chronic diseases in the area of Augusta, Georgia. Despite the importance of diet in the management of chronic diseases, inadequate nutrition education among patients and healthcare providers presents a barrier. The purpose of TEACH Kitchen is to address this gap. Methods: TEACH Kitchen is as a student-led initiative that promotes healthy cooking among medical students and patients with chronic diseases. Healthy nutrition and cooking classes are held during the academic year. Participants spend four weeks on each of four modules: obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. Data collection, which began in January 2017, is currently on going. TEACH Kitchen has collaborated with Augusta University, Sodexo, and Kohl’s. Results: Currently, TEACH Kitchen has enrolled 14 patients and 6 children. Anticipated results include measurements of preand post-intervention changes in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and competence in nutrition, as well as differences in clinical indicators, including body mass index, blood pressure, lipid profile, and HbA1c. Conclusions: TEACH Kitchen is the first medical school-based nutrition/cooking education initiative in Augusta, Georgia. It provides patients and medical students with hands-on healthy nutrition/cooking experience with the goal of decreasing the prevalence and improving the outcome of obesity-related diseases.