Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHabtetsion, Tsadik Ghebreamlak
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-03T16:22:52Z
dc.date.available2017-08-03T16:22:52Z
dc.date.issued8/3/2017en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621524
dc.description.abstractCD4+ T cells are critical mediators of anti-tumor immunity. Accumulating evidence from preclinical and clinical studies suggests that tumor-reactive CD4+ T cells in adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) have the potential to effectively control tumor growth. In most ACT clinical settings, chemotherapeutic agents are used to induce an immunostimulatory milieu which facilitates the effector function of donor T cells. Although the efficacy of ACT has been well-established, currently only a fraction of patients with certain types of malignancy have benefited, highlighting the need for improved ACT strategies. Recent studies have revealed that the metabolic reprogramming by cancer cells attenuate antitumor immune response by imposing nutrient restrictions in the tumor microenvironment, which leads to defective T cell responses. In the current study, we set out to explore how Cyclophosphamide (CTX) and tumor reactive CD4+ T cells alter the metabolic features of cancer cells. By comparing the global metabolic profiling of tumors pre and post-treatment, we found that CXT+CD4 ACT elicited a metabolic catastrophe affecting multiple pathways critical for cancer progression. Particularly, CTX+CD4 ACT led to marked reduction in glutathione (GSH) levels, increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative DNA damage product in tumors. Importantly, administration of N-acetyl-L-cysteine diminished the curative effect of CTX+CD4 ACT. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of GSH using Buthionine Sulfoximine (BSO) following CTX significantly delayed tumor growth in mice. Mechanistically, we found that TNFα synergized with chemotherapy to reduce intracellular GSH levels and promote ROS induction. TNFα enhanced cell death in chemotherapy pre-treated tumor cells and the cytotoxic effect was reversed by adding GSH exogenously. Importantly, the curative effect of CTX+CD4 ACT was abrogated after TNFα neutralization. Additionally, we found that CTX+CD4 ACT led to tumor vascular disruption causing hemorrhagic necrosis of tumors. IFNγR-deficient mice failed to reject tumor after CTX+CD4 ACT and had intact tumor vasculature. Collectively, our data reveal that tumor reactive CD4+T cells disrupt the redox homeostasis of cancer cells in TNFα-dependent manner. Whereas CD4+T cells derived IFNγ targeted tumor endothelial cells to cause vascular disruption and tissue ischemia. The combined action of these two cytokines leads to eventual eradication of established tumor.
dc.titlePolyfunctional CD4+ T cells synergize with chemotherapy to reprogram tumor metabolism towards a curative outcomeen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biologyen
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.date.updated2017-08-03T16:22:52Z
dc.description.advisorZhou, Gangen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
dc.description.committeeMunn, David; He, Yukai; Johnson, Theodore; Huo, Yuquingen
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-21T13:35:30Z
html.description.abstractCD4+ T cells are critical mediators of anti-tumor immunity. Accumulating evidence from preclinical and clinical studies suggests that tumor-reactive CD4+ T cells in adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) have the potential to effectively control tumor growth. In most ACT clinical settings, chemotherapeutic agents are used to induce an immunostimulatory milieu which facilitates the effector function of donor T cells. Although the efficacy of ACT has been well-established, currently only a fraction of patients with certain types of malignancy have benefited, highlighting the need for improved ACT strategies. Recent studies have revealed that the metabolic reprogramming by cancer cells attenuate antitumor immune response by imposing nutrient restrictions in the tumor microenvironment, which leads to defective T cell responses. In the current study, we set out to explore how Cyclophosphamide (CTX) and tumor reactive CD4+ T cells alter the metabolic features of cancer cells. By comparing the global metabolic profiling of tumors pre and post-treatment, we found that CXT+CD4 ACT elicited a metabolic catastrophe affecting multiple pathways critical for cancer progression. Particularly, CTX+CD4 ACT led to marked reduction in glutathione (GSH) levels, increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative DNA damage product in tumors. Importantly, administration of N-acetyl-L-cysteine diminished the curative effect of CTX+CD4 ACT. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of GSH using Buthionine Sulfoximine (BSO) following CTX significantly delayed tumor growth in mice. Mechanistically, we found that TNFα synergized with chemotherapy to reduce intracellular GSH levels and promote ROS induction. TNFα enhanced cell death in chemotherapy pre-treated tumor cells and the cytotoxic effect was reversed by adding GSH exogenously. Importantly, the curative effect of CTX+CD4 ACT was abrogated after TNFα neutralization. Additionally, we found that CTX+CD4 ACT led to tumor vascular disruption causing hemorrhagic necrosis of tumors. IFNγR-deficient mice failed to reject tumor after CTX+CD4 ACT and had intact tumor vasculature. Collectively, our data reveal that tumor reactive CD4+T cells disrupt the redox homeostasis of cancer cells in TNFα-dependent manner. Whereas CD4+T cells derived IFNγ targeted tumor endothelial cells to cause vascular disruption and tissue ischemia. The combined action of these two cytokines leads to eventual eradication of established tumor.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Habtetsion_gru_1907E_10064.pdf
Size:
2.498Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record