Recent Submissions

  • Progress City: An Honors Thesis Exhibition

    Conway, Baillie; Department of Art and Design (Augusta University, 2017-05)
    Progress City is a full-scale art exhibition examining the way history can be visually represented through sculpture. Focusing specifically on the time period during which America transitioned from an industrial to a service-based economy, it examines the effects this departure had on cities throughout the Southeast. Comprised of a series of sculptural buildings juxtaposed alongside a collection of found objects, this project mixes different forms of media together to create a conceptual display for the viewer to enjoy. As you will see, the project has undergone many revisions and edits over the course of this process. The final product is nowhere close to the ideas I had initially proposed at the beginning. However, you will come to see that, although this project may have seen many changes, it still revolves around the same theme, and that’s progress. [Introduction]
  • Progress City - An Honors Thesis Exhibition

    Conway, Baillie; Department of Art (2017-03)
    The purpose of this project is to explore the way sculpture can visually represent history. Progress City is an art exhibition that focuses specifically on the time period during which America transitioned from an industrial to a service-based economy (1950s - 1970s) and the effects this departure had on cities throughout the Southeast. The exhibition comprises a series of twelve buildings with sides featuring screen printed images of actual abandoned and dilapidated structures. Each building reflects an industry or trade that was once considered vital to the growth of southern communities. These buildings are juxtaposed alongside a collection of found objects that have either a direct or indirect correlation to businesses that once occupied the actual structures. For example, a series of empty food packaging boxes from the 1950s are set alongside a structure featuring screen printed images of an abandoned market facade. By juxtaposing the found objects, now considered outdated, alongside a corresponding abandoned building, the viewer is able to see first-hand the effects progress has had on southern cityscapes.