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dc.contributor.authorConway, Baillie
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-14T12:25:22Z
dc.date.available2017-03-14T12:25:22Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621349
dc.descriptionPoster presented at the 18th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this project is to explore the way sculpture can visually represent history. Progress City is an art exhibition that focuses specifically on the time period during which America transitioned from an industrial to a service-based economy (1950s - 1970s) and the effects this departure had on cities throughout the Southeast. The exhibition comprises a series of twelve buildings with sides featuring screen printed images of actual abandoned and dilapidated structures. Each building reflects an industry or trade that was once considered vital to the growth of southern communities. These buildings are juxtaposed alongside a collection of found objects that have either a direct or indirect correlation to businesses that once occupied the actual structures. For example, a series of empty food packaging boxes from the 1950s are set alongside a structure featuring screen printed images of an abandoned market facade. By juxtaposing the found objects, now considered outdated, alongside a corresponding abandoned building, the viewer is able to see first-hand the effects progress has had on southern cityscapes.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectSculptureen
dc.subjectHistoryen
dc.subjectSoutheast United Statesen
dc.subjectCityscapesen
dc.subjectArten
dc.titleProgress City - An Honors Thesis Exhibitionen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Arten
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this project is to explore the way sculpture can visually represent history. Progress City is an art exhibition that focuses specifically on the time period during which America transitioned from an industrial to a service-based economy (1950s - 1970s) and the effects this departure had on cities throughout the Southeast. The exhibition comprises a series of twelve buildings with sides featuring screen printed images of actual abandoned and dilapidated structures. Each building reflects an industry or trade that was once considered vital to the growth of southern communities. These buildings are juxtaposed alongside a collection of found objects that have either a direct or indirect correlation to businesses that once occupied the actual structures. For example, a series of empty food packaging boxes from the 1950s are set alongside a structure featuring screen printed images of an abandoned market facade. By juxtaposing the found objects, now considered outdated, alongside a corresponding abandoned building, the viewer is able to see first-hand the effects progress has had on southern cityscapes.


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