The mission of the Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice, and Social Work is to conduct innovative social research and teach skills to empower our students to contribute to a better society. We seek to explore and reveal how society and culture shape human lives, attitudes, and actions. We strive to make our students more effective and valuable as citizens, scholars, and professionals through teaching the skills of social analysis, research, writing, and social action. More information can be found at http://www.augusta.edu/pamplin/sociology/.

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Recent Submissions

  • IS EXERCISE THE BIGGEST INFLUENCER OF HAPPINESS? RESEARCHING HOW INFLUENTIAL EXERCISE IS IN COMPARISON TO OTHER VARIABLES IN DAILY LIFE

    Collins, Megan; Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice & Social Work; Davies, Kim; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
    There have been multiple studies that indicate that there is a relationship between exercise and happiness. In this research, I test whether exercise is the strongest factor when compared to other common variables in a person's life for predicting happiness. Using the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) data, I test several different variables in order to determine which of them has the strongest correlation with a person's general happiness. The 2012 GSS consisted of 4,820 respondents that ranged in age from 18 to 89. Using logistic regression, I compare the variables of sex, marriage, age, frequency of exercise, employment, and income and found that exercise has a positive relationship with a person's general happiness and that is the most strongly correlated variable. Other variables were also found to be significant and will be discussed in the poster.
  • Civilizing with a Krag: U.S. Counter-Insurgency in Vietnam and Iraq

    Ritchie, George; Department of Social Sciences (Augusta University, 2018-05)
  • Measuring the Impact of the Community Policing Model in Richmond County

    Wilson, Jacob; Department of Social Science (Augusta University, 2018-05)
  • Effectiveness Community-Oriented Policing from the perspectives of officers in an urban community

    Wilson, Jacob; Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice, & Social Work; Powell-Williams, Tood; Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice, & Social Work; Augusta University (2018-02-12)
    There are many different types of policing modelsranging from Police-Oriented policing, zero tolerance policing, and community-oriented policing. Community-oriented policing is a policing philosophy that focuses on utilizing the relationships with the public in order to maintain order. The purpose of this research was to determine how effective community-oriented policing was in Richmond County. This was achieved by gaining different perspectives on the topic by law enforcement that worked at the Richmond County Police Department. Eight law enforcement officers were interviewed to in order to gain more insight on the topic. Furthermore, research was conducted in regards to studying the department by analyzing the data it makes known to the public. After conducting my research, the overall consensus from the officers was that community-oriented policing was an effective policing model. Interviews and data showed that there could be improvement in particular areas, such as patrol routes and zones, but they did not inhibit the model's effectiveness.
  • The Fifty-First State: How Americanization Through the Military Transformed South Korea's Politics and Culture

    Welsh, Grace; Pamplin College; Albert, Craig; Department of Political Science; Bratton, Angela; Department of History, Anthropology, & Philosophy; Leightner, Jonathan; Hull College of Business; Augusta University (2018-02-12)
    Currently, the United States continually maintains a military presence in the South Korea even after the Korean War. This has greatly affected Korean culture through the widespread use of English. As such, the notion of Americanization developed through militarization and is referred to as the action of making something American in character or nationality. Instead of rejecting the influence of the United States, Korean culture localized what was once globalized through modern popular culture. Since the late 1990's and early 2000's, Korean Pop (Kpop) music, films, and Kdramas (television shows) have grown substantially in popularity and productionresulting in a strong international following. Many examples of American influences, such as the military,are seen in these entertainment fields because ofglobalization and localization (glocalization). This paper investigates the effects of Americanization through militarization from the Korean War on South Korea's current military. By examining different time frames, current examples of Korean pop culture will be utilized to explain localized American influences regarding the military.
  • Case Study: Legalize It All

    Wilder, Corneshia S.; Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice & Social Work (2017-03)
    Currently, there are over 20 states in the United States that made using marijuana legal for medical purposes. With nearly half of the states legalized marijuana, some believe that stronger illegal drugs, such as cocaine and meth, should be legalized. Dan Baum, a writer, wrote an article in Harper’s Magazine that it is time to “legalize it all”. Other do not believe that harder drugs should be legalized. Mark Kleiman, a public policy expert and professor, predicts that alcohol and cocaine addiction will rise if harder drugs become legal. Is it ethically permissible to legalize harder drugs in the United States? In my presentation, I am going to explain the case in detail. It will include information about the stakeholder and how each stakeholder will be affected. I will also explain my viewpoint of the case by using theories and statistics to explain my position in the case.
  • Waiting for Heroes: An Examination of P.1ychologica/ Disorders, Existentialism, and General Strain Themy in Superhero Films

    Hendricks, Austin; Department of Social Sciences (Augusta University, 2015-12)
    For years following the release of the first superhero comics in 1938, comic enthusiasm boomed, leading to the creation of countless superheroes and crime fighters. However, these comics were regarded by many to belong solely to a certain group of people. According to Marvel Comics publisher Martin Goodman, the main audience for comics was young kids and illiterate adults (Goldin, 2003). A big contributor to this fact was the Comic’s Code, which was introduced in 1954 by the United States government to regulate comic books and ensure that they were appropriate for children through the banning of content that was considered to be too “adult.” This led to the cancellation of many comics and the proliferation of the idea that comics were supposed to be for children. It was not until the release of the film Superman in 1978 that superheroes entered the big screen and appealed to a larger audience of all ages. While there had been many adaptations of superhero comics up to this point in the form of live-action television shows and cartoons, the 1978 Superman film presented the world of superheroes to the general public in the most influential form yet. The success of this film resulted in three sequels and the release of four films about the vigilante Batman by Tim Burton and Joel Schumacher. The success of the Superman and Batman films then led to the release of numerous other superhero film franchises including Spiderman, X-Men, Iron Man, the Christopher Nolan Batman trilogy, and Thor. These films have been met with different levels of success, ranging from mockery to large-scale financial success. Regardless of whether or not they are successful, the films attempt to reinvent the characters for a modern audience while still adhering to the comics that serve as the base material. [Introduction]