Recent Submissions

  • SoTL Scholars Speak

    Schwind, Jessica Smith; Weeks, Thomas; Reich, Nickie; Johnson, Melissa; Armstrong, Rhonda; Hartmann, Quentin; Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology; University Libraries; Department of Mathematics; University Libraries; Department of English and Foreign Languages; Department of English and Foreign Languages; Department of Psychological Sciences (2016-09)
    Jessica Smith Schwind, Learning is Contagious: Lessons in Online Course Design: Online learning environments are a key platform for teaching and learning in the 21st century, but they often try to simply recreate the classical in-person classroom. Our goal was to develop, implement and evaluate an immersive, online course where students are key players in a captivating epidemiologic outbreak investigation using a multidisciplinary team approach.; Thomas Weeks, Using threshold concepts in information literacy instruction: While "threshold concept" is a buzzword in information literacy instruction, can it be useful for single-session information literacy instruction? This project evaluated students who received instruction based in threshold concepts to see if they did better than their peers who received traditional skills-based instruction.; Nickie Reich, Lessons Learned From My First Son Project Traditional vs. Discovery Learning in College Algebra: Ms. Reich will step the audience through the planning, implementation, and analysis of her first So TL project. Knowledge gained from the experience and from the project data will be shared.; Melissa Johnson and Rhonda Armstrong, Using Freely Available Texts in a Literature Classroom: Rhonda Armstrong and Melissa Johnson will present their So TL project and discuss the challenges of creating an American Literature survey (pre-colonial to present) using freely-available texts. They will also discuss the students' attitude toward and level of engagement with digital texts.; Quentin Hartmann, Can peers improve performance? An investigation of the Think-Pair-Share teaching strategy: The Think-Pair-Share teaching strategy was tested with a class of psychology majors in a Senior Capstone course. All students did the same assignment alone, then one half of the students provided feedback to each other; the other half worked alone and all were given the option to revise their work. Performance between groups was compared.