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dc.contributor.authorCulp, MaryBeth
dc.contributor.authorRobb, Wagner Sara
dc.contributor.authorBayakly, Rana A
dc.contributor.authorVena, E John
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-17T19:16:19Z
dc.date.available2016-10-17T19:16:19Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621037
dc.description.abstractBackground: The objective of this research was to investigate melanoma incidence rates and health outcomes in Georgia over time and by race, socio-economic status (SES), and gender. Methods: Age-adjusted melanoma incidence rates were obtained from the Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry SEER*Stat Database (2000-2011). To compare incidence rates across counties, and public health districts and by race, SES and gender, maps were generated using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). A cluster analysis was performed by use of SaTScan, and maps were created to visualize clusters of melanoma cases. Results: In Georgia, from 2000-2011, age-adjusted incidence rates for melanoma were higher among Whites than Blacks (28.0 vs. 1.1 per 100,000 population). For both races, high rates were found to be associated with high SES. For Whites, high rates were concentrated in urban areas relative to Blacks in rural areas. Clusters of melanoma incident cases were found mainly in the north central region of Georgia. Conclusions: For Georgia, results for map comparisons are consistent with previous research findings that higher melanoma incidence rates are associated with high SES for Whites and, to a lesser extent, for Blacks. Melanoma interventions in Georgia should focus on urban White and rural Black at-risk populations, especially those with high SES.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjectmelanomaen
dc.subjectRacial Disparitiesen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Statusen
dc.subjectCluster Analysisen
dc.titleRacial and socio-economic disparities in melanoma incidence rates in Georgia: 2000-2011en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGeorgia Department of Public Healthen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Georgiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationMedical University of South Carolinaen
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T08:07:27Z
html.description.abstractBackground: The objective of this research was to investigate melanoma incidence rates and health outcomes in Georgia over time and by race, socio-economic status (SES), and gender. Methods: Age-adjusted melanoma incidence rates were obtained from the Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry SEER*Stat Database (2000-2011). To compare incidence rates across counties, and public health districts and by race, SES and gender, maps were generated using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). A cluster analysis was performed by use of SaTScan, and maps were created to visualize clusters of melanoma cases. Results: In Georgia, from 2000-2011, age-adjusted incidence rates for melanoma were higher among Whites than Blacks (28.0 vs. 1.1 per 100,000 population). For both races, high rates were found to be associated with high SES. For Whites, high rates were concentrated in urban areas relative to Blacks in rural areas. Clusters of melanoma incident cases were found mainly in the north central region of Georgia. Conclusions: For Georgia, results for map comparisons are consistent with previous research findings that higher melanoma incidence rates are associated with high SES for Whites and, to a lesser extent, for Blacks. Melanoma interventions in Georgia should focus on urban White and rural Black at-risk populations, especially those with high SES.


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