Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPeden, Angela
dc.contributor.authorShah, H Gulzar
dc.contributor.authorToal, Russell
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Dayna S.
dc.contributor.authorWright, Alesha
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Ashton
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, A Nandi
dc.contributor.authorUhlich, Scott
dc.contributor.authorJones, Jeffery
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-18T19:44:51Z
dc.date.available2016-08-18T19:44:51Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618533
dc.description.abstractBackground: Georgia’s public health districts first began exploring the idea of national public health accreditation in 2008 when Cobb & Douglas Public Health included accreditation in their strategic plan. In May 2015, Cobb & Douglas Public Health was the first Georgia public health district to achieve national accreditation status. This article discusses the current state of accreditation readiness in Georgia and explores strengths and barriers to accreditation. Methods: This study utilized a case study approach in order to examine PHAB accreditation efforts in Georgia within a real-life context. Data came from three sources: nine Accreditation Readiness Assessments, a PHAB Pre-Application Technical Assistance Survey, and state-wide Accreditation Readiness Survey. Results: The Accreditation Readiness Assessments resulted in several lessons learned about common strengths and barriers to accreditation. Strengths included a dedicated staff and supportive Boards of Health. Barriers included accreditation fees and a lack of personnel time. The PHAB Pre-application TA Survey revealed that the majority of those surveyed would recommend TA to other agencies pursuing PHAB accreditation (91%). The Accreditation Readiness Survey revealed that 14 of 18 GA public health districts are either PHAB accredited (1 district), actively pursuing PHAB accreditation (2 districts), or planning to apply (11 districts). This includes 116 of the 159 Georgia counties (73%). Conclusions: The results of this case study show that 72% of Georgia’s public health districts are engaged in accreditation-related activities. This includes activities such as accreditation readiness assessment, community health assessment, QI council and plan development, strategic planning, and policy review.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjectaccreditationen
dc.subjectPHABen
dc.subjectPHSSRen
dc.subjectPBRNen
dc.titleThe state of accreditation readiness in Georgia: A case studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGeorgia Department of Public Healthen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of North Carolina School of Pharmacyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
dc.contributor.affiliationGeorgia Southern Universityen
dc.contributor.affiliationArmstrong State Universityen
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T07:59:14Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Georgia’s public health districts first began exploring the idea of national public health accreditation in 2008 when Cobb & Douglas Public Health included accreditation in their strategic plan. In May 2015, Cobb & Douglas Public Health was the first Georgia public health district to achieve national accreditation status. This article discusses the current state of accreditation readiness in Georgia and explores strengths and barriers to accreditation. Methods: This study utilized a case study approach in order to examine PHAB accreditation efforts in Georgia within a real-life context. Data came from three sources: nine Accreditation Readiness Assessments, a PHAB Pre-Application Technical Assistance Survey, and state-wide Accreditation Readiness Survey. Results: The Accreditation Readiness Assessments resulted in several lessons learned about common strengths and barriers to accreditation. Strengths included a dedicated staff and supportive Boards of Health. Barriers included accreditation fees and a lack of personnel time. The PHAB Pre-application TA Survey revealed that the majority of those surveyed would recommend TA to other agencies pursuing PHAB accreditation (91%). The Accreditation Readiness Survey revealed that 14 of 18 GA public health districts are either PHAB accredited (1 district), actively pursuing PHAB accreditation (2 districts), or planning to apply (11 districts). This includes 116 of the 159 Georgia counties (73%). Conclusions: The results of this case study show that 72% of Georgia’s public health districts are engaged in accreditation-related activities. This includes activities such as accreditation readiness assessment, community health assessment, QI council and plan development, strategic planning, and policy review.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Peden_5_1.pdf
Size:
1.249Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record