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dc.contributor.authorPeden, Angela
dc.contributor.authorScott, Alison
dc.contributor.authorPeden, John G.
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-27T17:19:37Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-27T17:19:37Zen
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/610916en
dc.description.abstractPrematurity and low birth weight (LBW) are important causes of infant morbidity in Georgia and the United States. Georgia county-level data were used to explore the relationships between prematurity and LBW and two social and economic determinants of health: race and poverty status. Spearman rank correlations and Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used. Prematurity and LBW were positively associated with poverty status and the presence of large African American populations. While causation cannot be inferred from correlative data, this analysis highlights the need to consider the role of social and economic factors in infant morbidity. It also highlights the need to target interventions and services to geographic areas most in need.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.titleSocial and Economic Determinants of Infant Ill Health in 159 Georgia Counties: A Comparison Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGeorgia Southern Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-10T07:39:47Z
html.description.abstractPrematurity and low birth weight (LBW) are important causes of infant morbidity in Georgia and the United States. Georgia county-level data were used to explore the relationships between prematurity and LBW and two social and economic determinants of health: race and poverty status. Spearman rank correlations and Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used. Prematurity and LBW were positively associated with poverty status and the presence of large African American populations. While causation cannot be inferred from correlative data, this analysis highlights the need to consider the role of social and economic factors in infant morbidity. It also highlights the need to target interventions and services to geographic areas most in need.


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