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dc.contributor.authorLopez, Faye
dc.contributor.authorRimando, Marylen
dc.contributor.authorKhapekar, Harshali
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-27T12:53:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-27T12:53:59Zen
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/610886en
dc.description.abstractHypertension is a leading cause of stroke, coronary artery disease, heart attack, and heart and kidney failure in the United States. In Georgia, the percentage of those with hypertension and related diseases remain above the national average. The aim of this paper is to offer a basic review of hypertension including physical complications of the disease and to provide statistics regarding the scope of hypertension in the state of Georgia. Additionally, the paper provides insights on current hypertension programs such as the National High Blood Pressure Education Program (NHBPEP) and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH). In conclusion, a statewide or local hypertension education program should be implemented to improve awareness, treatment, opportunities, and control of hypertension in an effort to reduce cardiovascular disease rates in Georgia.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.titleA Needs Assessment of Hypertension in Georgiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMercer Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-09T22:54:25Z
html.description.abstractHypertension is a leading cause of stroke, coronary artery disease, heart attack, and heart and kidney failure in the United States. In Georgia, the percentage of those with hypertension and related diseases remain above the national average. The aim of this paper is to offer a basic review of hypertension including physical complications of the disease and to provide statistics regarding the scope of hypertension in the state of Georgia. Additionally, the paper provides insights on current hypertension programs such as the National High Blood Pressure Education Program (NHBPEP) and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH). In conclusion, a statewide or local hypertension education program should be implemented to improve awareness, treatment, opportunities, and control of hypertension in an effort to reduce cardiovascular disease rates in Georgia.


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