• Evaluation results of an innovative pilot program to increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables in Cobb County, GA

      Woodruff, C Rebecca; Shipley, Rebecca; Brown, Agnes F.; Coleman, Anne-Marie; Munoz, Jennifer; Honeycutt, Sally; Hermstad, April K; Loh, Lorna; Kegler, Michelle C.; Emory University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2015)
      Background: This abstract describes a public health practice initiative called the Farm Fresh Market (FFM) and presented pilot evaluation results. Methods: The FFM, developed by Cobb and Douglas Public Health, the McCleskey-East Cobb Family YMCA, and Cobb2020, sold low-cost fruits and vegetables to families living in the 30168 zip code of Austell, Georgia. The evaluation focused on documenting to what extent the FFM reached its intended population and increased perceived access to fresh fruits and vegetables among customers. A convenience sample of 100 returning FFM customers completed self-administered, written intercept surveys at the end of the 2014 market season. Results: The market served customers from a range of socioeconomic backgrounds. Most customers strongly agreed that the FFM made it easier (69%) and less expensive (79%) for them to buy fresh fruits and vegetables and easier for them (63%) and their families (64%) to eat a healthy diet. Most customers reported that they ate more vegetables (65%) and fruit (55%) as a result of shopping at the FFM and reported high levels of satisfaction with all aspects of the FFM. Conclusions: The results suggest that the FFM served customers from the local area and that the FFM may have increased perceived access to healthy food options among customers. Community-level interventions to increase access to healthy foods may play an important role in chronic disease prevention.
    • Increased perception of mosquito problems during a stormwater restoration project

      Kelly, Rosmarie; Georgia Department of Public Health (Georgia Public Health Association, 2015)
      In 2008, a plan for improvement of the McDaniel Branch Watershed was prepared for the city of Atlanta, Department of Watershed Management. This included the construction of ponds in a kudzu-covered area at Bowen Circle. There is a perception that wetlands create mosquito problems. In point of fact, most of the vector and nuisance species in Atlanta are either container breeders or floodwater species, and do not breed in ponds. Because there is an average of 5 cases of West Nile virus (WNV) reported in Fulton County per year, most of these near Combined Sewer Overflow streams, county residents are aware of the connection between mosquitoes and WNV. As the McDaniel Branch Watershed Improvement Plan progressed, neighborhood residents became convinced that the changes being implemented in the area were increasing mosquito problems and increasing their risk of WNV infections. In Oct 2013, the Environmental Health Section of the Georgia Department of Public Health was contacted by the City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management concerning control of mosquitoes in the ponds being created at the Bowen Circle site. It was determined that mosquito surveillance should be implemented in the area to determine if the changes to the watershed area were creating a mosquito problem. At the end of the 2014 mosquito surveillance season, it was established that there was little association between the watershed improvement project, the reported mosquito exposure, and measures of mosquito production within this neighborhood.
    • Substance use-related brief interventions with emergency department patients reduce mental health co-morbidities

      Johnson, J. Aaron; Abraham, Amanda J.; Georgia Regents University; University of Georgia (Georgia Public Health Association, 2015)
      Background: Research on screening and brief interventions (SBIs) has shown that, in addition to reducing alcohol use, interventions delivered in healthcare settings can reduce trauma readmissions, hospitalization days, driving offenses, and future healthcare utilization and costs. Mental health co-morbidities often accompany unhealthy alcohol and drug use, but few studies have examined the impact of SBIs on the mental health of patients. The present study determined if SBIs focused on reducing alcohol or drug use affected the mental health status of patients at a six-month follow-up. Methods: Participants (N=1152) were randomly sampled from patients receiving SBIs for at-risk alcohol or drug use after presenting to one of two urban emergency departments (EDs) in Georgia. Telephone follow-up interviews were completed with 698 of the original participants at six months after the intervention. Mental health co-morbidities were measured at both time points using the Global Assessment of Individual Needs Short Screener (GAIN-SS) and the SF-12. Analyses were conducted using paired samples t-tests. Results: Analyses found significant reductions in the percentage of patients reporting feelings of anxiety (45% to 33%, p<0.001), depression (52% to 37%, p<0.001), and suicidal ideation (13% to 8%, p<0.001) as well as improvements in global mental health measures (SF12 mental health score and internalizing and externalizing subscales of the GAIN-SS). Conclusions: Six months after receiving SBIs for alcohol and drug use in EDs, several measures of the mental health of participants showed significant improvements. Widespread implementation of SBIs in Georgia's EDs may affect a broad array of public health concerns, including mental health.