• Perceptions of Nurses Regarding a Nurse Residency Program

      Shaver, Chelsey; Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing (2016-03)
      Background: The turnover rate among newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) is a healthcare issue with reported rates as high as 61% within the first year of practicing. Job satisfaction and organizational factors impact retention rates per recent studies. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of a nurse residency program (NRP) among newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) related to job satisfaction and retention. Methods: The Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience survey was used to evaluate satisfaction of a NRP among NLRNs. This survey was distributed to 72 of the 88 nurse residents after they completed the nurse residency program on the NRU. Forty-three surveys were returned and 38 were included in the study. Results: The turnover rate of the 88 NLRNs who started the NRP was 8% after 20 months. Respondents reported overall satisfaction with the NRP in areas of skill level, job stress, work relationships and the organization. Areas noted for improvement included increased preparation for workload management and increased skill practice in code responses, IV insertion, and tracheostomy management. Conclusion/Recommendations for Practice: By improving job satisfaction, this NRP assisted the facility in maintaining turnover rates lower than those reported by evidence-based research. Participants reported more time on their home units would improve acclamation to workload management, though a tiered, increased patient load with increased acuity.