• Perceptions of Nurses Regarding a Nurse Residency Program

      Shaver, Chelsey; Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing (2016-03)
      Background: The turnover rate among newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) is a healthcare issue with reported rates as high as 61% within the first year of practicing. Job satisfaction and organizational factors impact retention rates per recent studies. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of a nurse residency program (NRP) among newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) related to job satisfaction and retention. Methods: The Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience survey was used to evaluate satisfaction of a NRP among NLRNs. This survey was distributed to 72 of the 88 nurse residents after they completed the nurse residency program on the NRU. Forty-three surveys were returned and 38 were included in the study. Results: The turnover rate of the 88 NLRNs who started the NRP was 8% after 20 months. Respondents reported overall satisfaction with the NRP in areas of skill level, job stress, work relationships and the organization. Areas noted for improvement included increased preparation for workload management and increased skill practice in code responses, IV insertion, and tracheostomy management. Conclusion/Recommendations for Practice: By improving job satisfaction, this NRP assisted the facility in maintaining turnover rates lower than those reported by evidence-based research. Participants reported more time on their home units would improve acclamation to workload management, though a tiered, increased patient load with increased acuity.
    • Reducing Tobacco Dependence: Evaluation of Tobacco Cessation Education on a Stroke Unit

      Cook-McKnight, Crystal; Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing (2016-03)
      Background: Tobacco use is the number one preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States.It is a leading cause of cerebrovascular disease, and tobacco users are three times more likely to have a stroke compared to non-tobacco users. Georgia is among the highest rates of tobacco use and stroke in the U.S. Evidence based tobacco cessation interventions are available; however, they are are underutilized by clinicians. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate if a brief educational intervention related to tobacco cesssation interventions compared to the current practice impacted the attitudes, beliefs, intentions and knowledge of tobacco cessation counseling of healthcare professionals on a stroke unit.Methods: A 45 minute presentation based on a guideline with the most current recommendations was provided to clinicians on a stroke unit. A pre-post survey evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and intentions of 29 nurses and a respiratory therapist related to tobacco cessation interventions in a tertiary care hospital in Georgia.Results:Tobacco counseling and treatment knowledge increased significantly from pre- to post-training. Average correct answers post survey was 76% versus the pre survey of 24%. Attitudes, beliefs and intentions were moderately correlated to improved self confidence. Conclusion: Overall, healthcare professionals exhibited improved tobacco cessation knowledge. Attitudes, beliefs and intentions were moderately impacted.